Western Art – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ Mon, 04 Jul 2022 10:07:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://russellchatham.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2.png Western Art – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ 32 32 An often misunderstood American master https://russellchatham.com/an-often-misunderstood-american-master/ Mon, 04 Jul 2022 10:02:19 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/an-often-misunderstood-american-master/ In town with a few summer hours to spare? Visit “Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe,” the long-awaited retrospective of a remarkable painter Yanktonai Dakota, who died in 1983, at the age of sixty-eight. The show is presented at the always-exciting New York branch of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, housed […]]]>

In town with a few summer hours to spare? Visit “Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe,” the long-awaited retrospective of a remarkable painter Yanktonai Dakota, who died in 1983, at the age of sixty-eight. The show is presented at the always-exciting New York branch of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, housed in the Alexander Hamilton US Custom House, a 1907 Beaux-Arts architectural marvel by Cass Gilbert, near Battery Park. It’s free. Too few attend. (Some days you can have the place and its spectacular collection of Native American art and artifacts almost to yourself, save for the occasional school group.) Howe is an often misunderstood American master. He bridged the gap between ethnic authenticity and internationalist bravery, though the condescension of establishment institutions and the exclusive homage of some sectarian defenders hampered his recognition as an outright canonical modernist. Really, go see.

In Howe’s 1965 “Sacro-Wi-Dance (Sun Dance)”, self-injured male celebrants are seen from an unlikely vantage point, below and looking up, as they tumble from a rendered foreshortening and serpentine of the noble rite, horizontally striped central pole. The dizzying composition incorporates tropes of Surrealism and Abstract Expressionism, which, having become second nature to Howe, hardly vitiate the intensity of this particular religious rapture. A palette of russet, yellow and black has precedents in the Lakota and Dakota crafts of skin painting and beadwork. But racial identity was not so much asserted as embedded in Howe’s pragmatic appropriation and advancement of a sophisticated aesthetic. In “Bear Dancer” (1962), illustrative details – a bear’s head, a wielding spear – hide discreetly amid abstract shapes distributed in a cubic fashion. Even more peekaboo are character bits in the hovering gallimaufry of “Dance of the Heyoka” (1954). Such paintings embody no purpose other than their own.

Howe owed the blossoming of his genius to the misfortune of his childhood. Born in 1915, as the Mazuha Hokshina tribe, on a poor reservation in South Dakota, he was sent seven years later to one of the federal boarding schools in the United States. At the time, these schools worked hard to suppress the age-old customs of Aboriginal youth. He did not speak English when he arrived. Plagued by eye and skin diseases and, in 1924, traumatized by the announcement of the death, of an illness, of his mother, he considered committing suicide. The school let him recover. He spent about a year on his home reservation with a wise grandmother, Shell Face, whose compelling stories imbued him with a deep knowledge of tribal history and myths. Such questions were foreign to his father, who despised his artistic aspirations. (Manual labor was then the almost obligatory horizon of ambition for most boys brought up on the reservations.) Howe then returned to the school, which in the meantime had undergone humane reforms. After graduating in 1933, he enrolled in an innovative art program at the Santa Fe Indian School in New Mexico.

Howe quickly became a leader in what was dubbed the Studio Style, which originated at school, elegantly arranging linear tribal patterns in negative space with touches of color spared. A copy of the exhibition, “Blue Antelope” (circa 1934-38), delicately represents the eponymous animal under a floating arch with austere geometry. By the early fifties, after the Studio movement had begun to turn into a gift shop, Howe was onto something more expansive, informed by an avid appreciation of Western modern art, albeit at first only by way of reproduction, while being supported, in South Dakota, teaching jobs and eventually doing commissioned work on public murals.

Howe served in Europe as an army artillery soldier in World War II, almost never speaking of the experience except sardonically. (His unwavering goal, he noted, was to avoid winning a Purple Heart.) Returning to the United States in 1945, he was joined two years later by his fiancée, a German named Heidi Hampel, whom he had met and courted during the war. . She was to be a shrewd and formidable partner for the rest of her life. The couple met in New York and, traveling west by train, married during a stopover in Chicago, to escape an anti-miscegenation law in South Dakota, where they settled . Howe returned to teaching and earned BA and MFA degrees at universities there and in Oklahoma. Their daughter, Inge Dawn, born in 1948, still administers her father’s inheritance.

“Dakota Modern,” carefully curated by Kathleen Ash-Milby, consists almost exclusively of works in tempera, watercolor, gouache, or casein on paper. The execution is phlegmatically deliberate. The photographs of Howe, always well dressed and placidly industrious, usually seated at a table, dovetail oddly with the powerful compositions and aggressive hues of his images. The result is a channeling of the pure and visionary imagination, as if the artist were taking dictation from an invisible demiurge. Do any of the effects seem cartoonish, with figuration that anticipates the popular styles of graphic fiction that took hold in the seventies? Maybe. Yet the generic characters in melodramatic poses strategically depersonalize the subjects in favor of thematic punch and decorative finesse. The results exalt audacity and exude beauty. Howe rarely repeated himself. Each work may seem unique, fulfilling a special mission to a farewell. If a quality is constant, it is suddenness.

Howe’s subjects are rarely historical or overtly political, with the chief and sensational exception of the “Wounded Knee Massacre” gouache (1959-60), which, at twenty-two inches high and twenty-eight inches wide, is small but looks monumental. It depicts a line of soldiers firing along the edge of a ditch, who sift through helpless Lakota men below while, in the distance, bluecoats decimate other groups with weapons that include a sinister-fired Hotchkiss pistol. rapid fire. (A rifleman, neglecting to fire, looks askance with an enigmatically awkward smile. He haunts me.) white conquest.

Another image in the series, “Fleeing a Massacre” (1969), may also allude to this event, if not another in the annals of exterminating violence in the United States. A panicked young woman is seen on a galloping but bloodied and overworked horse, the image framed by lyrical arabesques. Collective tragedy is a given, not a problem, for Howe, who made no effort to outrage or comfort anyone.

His journey was lonely, arousing resistance even from compatriots who regularly greeted him. As late as 1958, he was denied a prize at an annual exhibition of indigenous artists because the new painting he submitted, “Umini Wacipi (Dance of War and Peace)”, was declared “non-Indian”, despite its unmistakable subject matter. . (It’s reproduced in the handsome catalog of “Dakota Modern,” but its current whereabouts are uncertain.) He responded with the only publicized polemic of his career, a letter to a show host who mocked the bait tourist “pretty, stylized images” favored by officially sanctioned authorities. a bunch of sheep, with no right to individualism, dictated as the Indian always was, put on reservations and treated like children…”

Another setback to Howe’s self-reliance, though it increased his fame, occurred in 1960. He traveled to California with “Wounded Knee Massacre”, at the request of actor Vincent Price, who had collected works by him, for an Aboriginal art exhibition in Hollywood. The exhibition took place, but the personal invitation turned out to be a ruse, to entice the artist to appear on the television show “This Is Your Life”, which made a surprising bunch of guest stars with sentimental exhibits of their life stories. Thus ostracized on one side and exotic on the other, Howe was alone.

Howe was as little interested in political dissent as he was in commercial pastiche. But he must have been aware of the drama he had created by frankly embracing his Dakota heritage without parochial restriction or outward resentment, however justifiable that resentment might have been. He proposed, and exemplified, a difficult but open imperative for Native American artists of all stylistic leanings – to look back with fidelity and sideways with candor while moving forward – in a statement he issued in 1959: “It’s our art. . . and here is where we make our last fight. . . . The least we can do is fight this last battle, for Indian culture to live on forever. ♦

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A cultural link between China and the world https://russellchatham.com/a-cultural-link-between-china-and-the-world/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 15:41:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/a-cultural-link-between-china-and-the-world/ BEIJING, June 30, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — After five years of effort and construction, the Hong Kong Palace Museum (HKPM) was finally opened on June 22 and should open the July 2ndrepresenting a new cultural landmark in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR). Five years ago, the June 29, 2017Chinese President Xi Jinping was present […]]]>

BEIJING, June 30, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — After five years of effort and construction, the Hong Kong Palace Museum (HKPM) was finally opened on June 22 and should open the July 2ndrepresenting a new cultural landmark in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR).

Five years ago, the June 29, 2017Chinese President Xi Jinping was present at the signing ceremony of the cooperation agreement between the Mainland and the Hong Kong SAR on the development of the West Kowloon Cultural District Museum.

In a show of his care and interest in the city’s cultural and artistic development, Xi visited the district hours after arriving for a three-day inspection tour during the 20th anniversary celebrations of that of Hong Kong return to the homeland.

Xi said he hopes the Hong Kong SAR will carry on traditional culture and play a role in facilitating and promoting cultural exchanges and cooperation between China and the West, and between hong kong and the mainland.

A window on Chinese culture

The already thriving traditional Chinese culture of hong kongknown as the “Pearl of the Orient”, is further enhanced by the inauguration of HKPM.

With elements such as red doors adorned with golden door studs, the museum embodies the excellence of traditional Chinese culture and affirms its aspiration to become one of the world’s leading cultural institutions, committed to the study and appreciation of Chinese art and culture, while advancing the dialogue among civilizations through international partnerships.

More than 900 treasures from the collection of the Palace Museum in beijing will be put on rotating display for the inaugural exhibitions. Some of these pieces are presented in hong kong for the first time, while others have never been shown in public before, according to HKPM.

In addition to physical institutions such as museums, hong kong has also been a stage for various styles of traditional Chinese theater. Inscribed on the first national list of intangible cultural heritage in 2006 and on the representative list of UNESCO in 2009, Cantonese opera is among the most popular.

In August 2017in order to preserve its intangible cultural heritage, hong kong unveiled the first representative list of 20 items, ranging from performing arts such as Cantonese opera to festival events such as Tai Hang fire dragon dance and traditional craftsmanship of bamboo theater building technique.

A fusion of East and West

hong kong is a place where Chinese and Western cultures blend, tradition and modernity merge, and old and new merge to present a unique contrast.

President Xi pointed out in 2018 that thanks to its cultural diversity, hong kong will continue to play a special role in promoting East-West cultural exchanges, facilitating mutual learning between civilizations and creating links between peoples.

As an international business and financial center characterized by openness and diversity, hong kong is home to some 600,000 non-Chinese residents, many of whom have resided in the city for decades.

Arthur de Villepin is one of them. He runs a gallery on Hollywood Road in the Central district on Hong Kong Islandwith his father Dominique de Villepinwho served as France prime minister from 2005 to 2007.

In an interview with China Media Group (CMG), the duo said they dedicated Villepin Gallery’s inaugural exhibition to the late Chinese-French abstract painter Zao Wou Kihailing it as a good example of “reconciliation between East and West”.

The youngster from Villepin said he was confident that “both art and culture will develop dramatically” in the city, and that the way “China is going to reveal itself to the world through its people with art is going to be extraordinary.”

A city that tells China stories

During a meeting with a hong kong delegation, President Xi said the city, as a cosmopolitan metropolis, can take advantage of its vast ties with the world, spread the best of traditional Chinese culture and tell China stories.

TV presenter Janis Chan is one such storyteller. In the documentary “No Poverty Land”, she and her team spent three months visiting 10 regions of the Chinese mainland to present China anti-poverty efforts, which were not widely known around the world.

The work was praised by viewers in hong kongthe continent and beyond, winning Chan Best Female Host at the 2021 TVB Anniversary Awards at hong kongand the model of “Touching China 2021” in the mainland.

Following these honors, she confided to the media that it was she who had been touched. “Each person we interviewed represents the remarkable character of the Chinese people.”

In a recent interview with CMG, Chan said she will be documenting more stories on China inform domestic and foreign audiences about the development of the nation.

https://news.cgtn.com/news/2022-06-30/Hong-Kong-25-years-on-A-cultural-bond-between-China-and-the-world–1bhc01Ua5ws/index.html

SOURCECGTN

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The best sci-fi shows on Prime Video https://russellchatham.com/the-best-sci-fi-shows-on-prime-video/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 01:56:51 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/the-best-sci-fi-shows-on-prime-video/ First video might not make it easy to find its best sci-fi offerings, but hopefully this list helps you with that. Amazon has selected three of the best science fiction series: Counterpart, The extent and black orphan. Have you ever watched this essential trio? Try out some of the intriguing new originals, including night sky […]]]>

First video might not make it easy to find its best sci-fi offerings, but hopefully this list helps you with that. Amazon has selected three of the best science fiction series: Counterpart, The extent and black orphan. Have you ever watched this essential trio? Try out some of the intriguing new originals, including night sky and Outdoor beach.

Read more: Best Fire TV Stick in 2022

Scroll down to see our top picks for the best sci-fi TV shows you can stream right now on Prime Video.

Screenshot of Channel 4/YouTube/CNET

Humans may not be entirely original, but the assembled parts sing. A British family buys an artificially intelligent robot called a “synthesizer” to help them through their busy lives. This grounded approach to sentient and potentially dangerous robots is one of humans’ greatest strengths. At the center of the sweet: an innocent bond between the youngest daughter of the family and Anita, the elegant and efficient synth of Gemma Chan. A mystery draws the family into the origins of robots, which explore inescapable philosophical themes such as humanity, pain, memories and reality.

Elizabeth Sisson

Electric Dreams (2017-2018)

Electric Dreams is aptly named, each episode of the anthology series is a vibrant, polished product purring to the ideas of its source material: the works of Philip K. Dick. As with most anthologies, some episodes are better than others, but if you fancy telling stories with Black Mirror-like setups, let that reverie slip away.

Amazon Studios

The Man in the High Castle (2015-2019)

The Man in the High Castle imagines an alternate history where the Axis powers (Rome-Berlin-Tokyo) win World War II. Based on a novel by Philip K. Dick, the series follows characters from the 1960s who live in a parallel universe, where Nazi Germany and the Empire of Japan control the United States. But there are impossible news images surfacing of a world where Germany and Japan are losing the war, causing some to rebel. To really hammer home its dystopian credentials, The Man in the High Castle is helmed by producer Ridley Scott. Fully realized and with a focused plot, it’s gripping television.

Starz/YouTube/CNET Screenshot

The counterpart features JK Simmons playing against JK Simmons. Get excited about it for a second. Set in Germany during a Cold War, the sci-fi thriller follows a lowly office grunt discouraged by his dark life. Then one day he switches to work and meets, but a better version of a parallel world. Secrets, tense action and a masterful dual-role performance from Simmons make Counterpart a must watch.

Screenshot Amazon Studios/YouTube/CNET

Tales from the Loop (2020—)

Not just another show about a small town where weird things happen, Tales from the Loop has layers beneath its beautiful surface. Based on a narrative art book by Swedish artist Simon Stålenhag, the series is beautiful to watch. Meticulous and symmetrical frames somehow give off a painterly feel. The interconnected city dwellers are equally nuanced, their stories exploring loneliness, aging, and the impact of technology.

BBC America

In more ways than one, Orphan Black is Tatiana Maslany’s show. Before she becomes a household name thanks to Disney Plus’ upcoming She-Hulk, see her play no less than 14 characters in one series, including a hallucinated scorpion. Let that sink in for a second. Orphan Black weaves clever sci-fi concepts into a fast-paced, galloping thriller with more mystery and comedy in its stride. An essential sci-fi series exploring the debate between nature and nurture.

Amazon Studios

Night Sky isn’t the most evocative title, and the series doesn’t reach the sci-fi heights that some may be looking for. Although the series presents a slow-burning mystery involving an alien planet, its greatest strength is the touching, sometimes surprisingly funny drama between an old couple, the most unlikely of protagonists. Facing health issues, not to mention dangerous new guests, Franklin and Irene York (the huge JK Simmons and Sissy Spacek) do their best to make sense of a portal to a mysterious and desolate planet.

Paramount More

Star Trek: Strange New Worlds (2022—)

The Star Trek series keeps coming. Set in the decade before Star Trek: The Original Series, Strange New Worlds follows Captain Pike (Anson Mount) and the crew of the starship USS Enterprise as they boldly go where no one has gone before. With nods to the storytelling, storytelling, and episodic designs of the previous series, Strange New Worlds puts a contemporary spin on much-loved territory.

First video

For trippy sci-fi that asks you to turn on your wild theory generator, look no further than Outer Range. The sci-fi western is set on the Abbott family ranch, where the Royal patriarch (Josh Brolin) is hiding an all-powerful secret. When a stranger comes to town (Imogen Poots), he’s forced to confront his past, present, and future, and not just in a metaphorical sense. Bizarre in ways you wouldn’t expect, Outer Range is a solid sci-fi outing well worth keeping.

EPIX

This sci-fi horror centers on a small town plagued by mysterious and terrifying events. When a family gets lost, they are sucked into a nightmare involving deadly creatures and equally deadly townspeople. With enough storylines to keep you hooked and a strong protagonist in Harold Perrineau’s Sheriff Stevens, From is an enticing destination to hang out.

Showtime/YouTube/Screenshot

The Man Who Fell to Earth (2022—)

This series, based on the novel by Walter Tevis, features a stunning cast: Chiwetel Ejiofor plays an alien who lands on Earth seeking help from a brilliant scientist and Bill Nighy plays Thomas Jerome Newton, an alien who has fallen to Earth in the 1976 film. adaptation. The role was originally played by David Bowie and each episode of this movie sequel is named after one of Bowie’s songs. A more than solid and entertaining series that is best watched without comparing it to previous material. Although, if you’re not a fan of split timelines, beware.

Amazon Studios

Amazon rescued The Expanse from the realm of canceled television, bringing the series to six seasons. Thank goodness, because The Expanse is smart sci-fi with realistic characters, high production values, and a touch of detective noir. In a future where humanity has colonized the solar system, a plot threatens to ignite a cold war between the greatest powers. A band of anti-heroes find themselves in the center. Expect more space western themes in the still excellent later seasons.

Screenshot Amazon Studios/YouTube/CNET

Black Mirror comparisons are inevitable with this British tech series gone awry. Set in futuristic London, The Feed centers on an implant that allows people to stream their lives live without needing to press a button on a phone. No, absolutely nothing is wrong. An impressive cast includes David Thewlis and Michelle Fairley. While not as polished or deep as Black Mirror, The Feed is still worth a look.

Amazon Studios

Upload’s plan combines Black Mirror and The Good Place to offer a lighthearted view of the virtual afterlife. In the near future, humans may be uploaded to a digital paradise, where they can still interact with the living. Even in death, computer programmer Nathan cannot escape his overbearing girlfriend. Meanwhile, he has help solving what could have been his own murder. A sometimes witty comedy set in an ever intriguing digital space.

Screenshot BBC Studios/YouTube/CNET

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (1981)

Before the 2005 film starring Martin Freeman, Douglas Adams’ classic sci-fi comedy franchise brought this cult ’80s TV series. Making the most of visual trickery, the six-episode series successfully brought Arthur Dent, Ford Prefect, Trillian, Zaphod Beeblebrox and Marvin on the small screen.

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Abani Thakur, the father of modern Indian art https://russellchatham.com/abani-thakur-the-father-of-modern-indian-art/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 08:25:54 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/abani-thakur-the-father-of-modern-indian-art/ Abanindranath Tagore or Abani Thakur (1871-1951) personifies this new national consciousness born in the field of art. June 25, 2022, 1:55 PM IST Indian nationalism draws its strength from diversity and pluralism. India’s resistance movement against colonialism was created by the new self-awareness that arose in all walks of life. The new revival was visible […]]]>

Abanindranath Tagore or Abani Thakur (1871-1951) personifies this new national consciousness born in the field of art.

June 25, 2022, 1:55 PM IST

Indian nationalism draws its strength from diversity and pluralism. India’s resistance movement against colonialism was created by the new self-awareness that arose in all walks of life. The new revival was visible in politics, literature and the arts. Abanindranath Tagore or Abani Thakur (1871-1951) personifies this new national consciousness born in the field of art.

Member of the illustrious Tagore family which left its indelible mark in politics, education, literature and the arts. Nephew of the great Ravindranath Tagore. Abani is considered the father of modern Indian art. He was the first proponent of Swadeshi values ​​in art. The founder of the legendary Bengal school of art replaced the dominance of the European style of art that ruled the Indian art world with the advent of colonialism.

Abani led the rediscovery of India’s great artistic traditions like Mughal and Rajput miniature art. He redefined and revived them and drew inspiration from Indian epics and the rock art of Ajanta.

Abani was born in 1871 in the ancestral Tagore village of Jorashanko. He learned the art from the European teachers of the Calcutta Arts School. But after discovering Mughal miniatures, he started drawing in this style. He illustrated the writings of Ravindranath Tagore. Abani’s pursuit of the Indian tradition was strengthened with the arrival of British art teacher EB Havel as headmaster of the Government Art School.

Great admirers of Indian traditions, Havel and Abani and his artist brother Gajendranath Tagore redefined the teaching and techniques of art based on Indian traditions. They formed the Indian Society of Oriental Art, also known as the Bengal School of Art. Great artists like Nandalal Bose and Jamini Roy were their disciples.

Abani took the initiative to rediscover an Asian artistic tradition by bringing Japanese and Chinese arts into his repertoire. The school attempted to claim and glorify an Indian tradition based on spirituality against the supposedly materialistic concepts of Western art.

The Bengal school also has a share of critics. Instead of being genuinely Indian, the school is accused of engendering an Orientalist concept as imagined by the West about India.

Also watch:

India@75: Historical solidarity between Hindus and Muslims in Ayodhya

India@75: Story of Alluri Seetha Rama Raju, the hero of the jungle

India@75: Attingal revolt, the first organized mutiny against British rule in India

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Abstract painter James Little breaks through with inclusion of Whitney Biennial and Kavi Gupta show https://russellchatham.com/abstract-painter-james-little-breaks-through-with-inclusion-of-whitney-biennial-and-kavi-gupta-show/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 21:51:09 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/abstract-painter-james-little-breaks-through-with-inclusion-of-whitney-biennial-and-kavi-gupta-show/ Over the past four decades, abstract artist James Little has done everything from monochromatic black paintings rendered with straight lines to colorful canvases filled with repeating rectangles and white surfaces adorned with multicolored circles. Although Little’s paintings cannot be defined by any particular genre, they are all captivating abstract works that transport the viewer into […]]]>

Over the past four decades, abstract artist James Little has done everything from monochromatic black paintings rendered with straight lines to colorful canvases filled with repeating rectangles and white surfaces adorned with multicolored circles. Although Little’s paintings cannot be defined by any particular genre, they are all captivating abstract works that transport the viewer into a field of color.

“If I put a painting together, I have geometry,” Little says. “Maybe I have a luminosity. I have all these things that are formal, but not representative. It’s not me painting a tree, a bowl, a human figure or anything like that. [My practice] relies heavily on imagination and feelings, vision and skills.

Today, Little’s virtuosity is finally gaining wider recognition. The Memphis-born painter’s canvases feature prominently at the 2022 Whitney Biennial, Quiet as it is kept (until September 5). A work from the exhibition, stars and stripes (2019), shows a pattern of intersecting black lines when viewed up close and, from a distance, reveals a complicated arrangement of diamonds and triangles. These shapes seem sacred, meditative in a way, and looking at this canvas makes the viewer feel as if they are stepping into the inky black pool of someone’s subconscious.

James Little, stars and stripes, 2021 Courtesy of the artist. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

“There are a lot of different meanings behind these paintings,” Little says. “The Black Star [works] reflect how we perceive ourselves and [have] astrological connotations. I’m sure there will be people who will come in and attach some sort of sociological significance to it, which is fine, but I have other goals as well. I just like to raise the questions and allow the paintings to have a kind of contemplation.

Another piece on display, big hat (2021), also uses black brushstrokes to create a shape that resembles a six-pointed star. This tableau is punctuated by lines that converge to a singular point and inlaid textures that speak to the intricacies of Little’s sacred geometries. He achieves these grainy surfaces using encaustic paint, which requires the artist to carefully apply layers of wax and pigment to a flat surface, a meticulous process that can take months.

“I was drawn to the paintings,” says Chicago-based dealer Kavi Gupta. “I was drawn to their physique. He mixes polishes, encaustics and pigments, which almost no one does. Gupta adds: ‘He has to be so consistent. It’s hard to get the level of pigmentation that he reached because he needs to get those huge swaths of color.

Little recently joined the Gupta Gallery roster, where he will have a solo exhibition in November. It will present new works drawing on the artist’s interests for surface, texture and color.

The relationship between surfaces and materials in Little’s work is informed by her humble beginnings. Born in 1952 in Memphis, Tennessee, the artist came of age at a time when the American South was still deeply segregated. Most of his mother’s family had emigrated from Mississippi, while his father’s family had Native American, Irish, and black ancestry.

“My work comes from necessity,” says Little. “My mother was a cook. My father was a construction worker. My grandmother was a seamstress and she made quilts with her children’s clothes. They were from Mississippi, and they were very poor and found a way to get ahead and fly, and that’s the story of a lot of black people in this country, especially in the South.

James Little, Borrowed times2021 Collection of the artist; courtesy of the artist and Kavi Gupta Gallery, Chicago. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

Many of these early experiences and family stories had a profound impact on the painter and a vivid memory still inspires him today, as he recounted in a 2009 interview with Benjamin La Rocco for the Brooklyn Railroad. When Little was a child, his father and grandfather took him to a construction site where they worked. When Little arrived, he saw workers mixing and pouring cement, a process that fascinated him.

“It had a strange influence on my sensitivity to the surface, even to this day,” Little told La Rocco. “I just like the idea of ​​taking this medium, this material, and transforming it, making it do something other than what it wanted to do.”

As he entered his teens, Little remained fascinated with materials and continued to hone his practice, working with readily available supplies and copying Old Master paintings by Thomas Eakins from the Encyclopedia Britannica, according to a 2011 study. . ART news article by Celia McGee. Upon graduating from high school, Little decided to pursue these interests formally, enrolling at the Memphis Academy of Art, where he earned his BFA in 1974. He earned his MFA from Syracuse University in 1976 .

When Little began his career, racial tensions were always present in the background. The artist’s adolescence coincided with the height of the civil rights movement and there were not many other black artists exhibiting in mainstream museums and galleries at the time.

“I was 21 before I paid attention to a black artist because it wasn’t available,” Little says. “It was not taught in schools. We haven’t seen it. It was not in the museum, there was no representation. In a way, it allowed me to develop my own ideas about art. But at the same time, I felt cheated because I was just immersed in Western painting.

This lack of representation did not deter Little from refining his practice, and over the years he became a true painter of painters, committed to abstraction even as external events and prevailing trends sought to impose figurative readings to his work.

James Little, El-Shabazz (B)1985 Courtesy of the artist

Some of Little’s earlier works demonstrate the artist’s interest in color and craftsmanship. El-Shabazz (C) (1985), for example, depicts four pastel colored triangles that intersect at a single point. The lines in this painting are crisp and clean; they demonstrate a diligence that underlies all his work. Eventually, others took note of Little’s attention to detail and commitment to his singular brand of abstraction. He began exhibiting at the June Kelly Gallery in New York in 1988 and has works in the permanent collections of the Saint Louis Art Museum, the Studio Museum in Harlem and the Menil Collection in Houston.

Little’s meticulous approach remains a cornerstone of his practice and he continues to use his skill to evoke emotions with his materials.

“I love rhythm in my work,” Little said in a 2017 BOMB magazine interview. “Music and dance. Speed ​​and color. And it’s the things I see that are just as important as what we say or how we act.

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🌱 Juneteenth Monday SA Closures + Local YMCA Summer Leagues + SA NFL? https://russellchatham.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1-juneteenth-monday-sa-closures-local-ymca-summer-leagues-sa-nfl/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 03:41:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1-juneteenth-monday-sa-closures-local-ymca-summer-leagues-sa-nfl/ June 19 commemorates “the date Federal troops freed the last of the slaves in the United States” on June 19, 1865. In honor of this national holiday, I will not write Monday, June 20, you will only see therefore not a newsletter on Tuesday, June 21. But I’ll be back bright and early on Wednesday, […]]]>

June 19 commemorates “the date Federal troops freed the last of the slaves in the United States” on June 19, 1865. In honor of this national holiday, I will not write Monday, June 20, you will only see therefore not a newsletter on Tuesday, June 21. But I’ll be back bright and early on Wednesday, June 22, with your local daily news and events! —Gabriela Cantu Couvillion


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Here are today’s top stories in San Antonio:

  1. “On June 19, 1865, Union soldiers arrived in Galveston to announce the freedom of enslaved people in the South.” Since then, “African American communities” have celebrated the event every year on June 19, or Juneteenth. Last year, it officially “became a federal holiday…and is now celebrated across the United States, thanks to a Texas woman named Opal Lee.” In honour of vacations, mall offices will be closed Monday, June 20. For a list of local closures, visit: (TRP)
  2. The First Bud Light river of pride The parade and celebration took place on Saturday, June 18 at the San Antonio River walk. The event “was created by Visit San Antonio to promote inclusion, encourage and support the lgbtq+ community to live openly with equal rights.” To view photos from the event, please visit: (FOX 29)
  3. In honor of World Refugee Day, an event “sponsored by Texas Refugee Services” was held on Saturday, June 18 at Guadalupe Plaza, located at 1327 Guadalupe St. The celebration included “music, dance, poetry and more”. Julie Thornton, Texas Refugee Services, said, “World Refugee Day is a national celebration of people who have come to the United States as refugees simply to celebrate the diversity of the population we serve and to have kind of an opportunity for people to come together and have some camaraderie and activity. And I think just to really celebrate our world and what we’re doing here in the city. (TRP)
  4. Last week, “the YMCA kicked off its first Summer Youth Esports League” for kids ages 12-17, but if you missed it, “it’s not too late to sign up.” The summer program which takes place at three local YMCA sites consists of two 8-week periods with a short break between each, and although the Premier League has already started, “players can still register to compete.” For more details on the program and for a list of YMCA activities and locations, visit: (Subscription: mySA)
  5. For a while now, Mayor Ron Nirenberg hoped that “a The NFL team will call San Antonio home.” In May, “NFL on CBS asked its subscribers which city deserved an NFL expansion team,” and recently Mayor Nirenberg spoke “with KENS 5 about how San Antonio would be a good choice if there was ever an NFL expansion.” He said, “Well, I think speculation about NFL expansion is premature, but I don’t I wouldn’t expect a mayor of any city in the country not to do that. say, ‘hey, my city would be awesome.'” He added, “As it’s been assumed for years, if there’s a third team in Texas, it belongs in San Antonio.” (mysanantonio.com)

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Today in San Antonio:


From my notebook:

  • “You can always find what you’re looking for when you shop here in San Antonio – from local shops to well-known favourites!” (Visit San Antonio via Instagram)
  • Don’t miss San Antonio Zoo’s “Planet Earth: Deep Sea Adventures” presented by Broadway Bank! This summer, take a journey to the depths of the ocean to discover some of nature’s most fascinating creatures in one of the world’s most unique ecosystems!” (San Antonio Zoo via Instagram)
  • “Join us on Tuesday, June 21 at the San Antonio Zoo to celebrate and learn about one of the world’s most iconic species – the giraffe! Enjoy activities for all ages, including educational presentations, animal talks, themed enrichments and more! This event is included with standard admission and is free for members!” (San Antonio Zoo via Facebook)

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That’s all for today! I’ll be back in your inbox tomorrow with a new update.

Gabriela Cantu Couvillion

About me: I am a working mother of two adult sons and a lifelong resident of San Antonio. I received a BA in Spanish from the University of Texas at San Antonio, and in my free time I immerse myself in creative writing. Thanks for reading Patch, and please let us know if you have any news and events that you think our readers might enjoy!

Do you have a news tip or a suggestion for an upcoming San Antonio Daily? Contact me at sanantonio@patch.com

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Things to do around Chicago this weekend – NBC Chicago https://russellchatham.com/things-to-do-around-chicago-this-weekend-nbc-chicago/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 01:06:06 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/things-to-do-around-chicago-this-weekend-nbc-chicago/ Chicagoans celebrate Pride, Juneteenth and Father’s Day this weekend, along with art fairs, Cubs games and food festivals. Due to all the summer events, the Chicago Office of Emergency Management and Communications warned people traveling to the city Friday through Sunday to beware of additional crowds, resulting in different traffic patterns and delays. probable. Here […]]]>

Chicagoans celebrate Pride, Juneteenth and Father’s Day this weekend, along with art fairs, Cubs games and food festivals.

Due to all the summer events, the Chicago Office of Emergency Management and Communications warned people traveling to the city Friday through Sunday to beware of additional crowds, resulting in different traffic patterns and delays. probable.

Here are some of the events happening this weekend:

Chicago Pridefest at Northalsted

Saturday and Sunday, 11am-10pm

Along Halsted from Addison Street to Grace Street, Chicago’s Pride Fest returns this weekend with three stages of live music, food and drink, more than 150 art vendors, dancing, performances of dragsters, a parade of animals and gifts.

Green post markers with white numbers will be located on lamp posts along North Halsted for reference points, OEMC said. No large bags or backpacks will be allowed at the event, and all bags will be checked before entry.

More information here.

Taste of Chicago at the Pullman

Saturday, noon-8 p.m.

At Pullman Park, located at 11101 S. Cottage Grove, a smaller neighborhood version of the larger-scale Taste of Chicago features local food vendors, live music and dancing in Pullman.

More information here.

Gold Coast Art Fair at Grant Park

Saturday and Sunday, 10am-5pm

More than 200 artists from across the United States will be at Butler Park in Grant Park this weekend displaying their work while people enjoy watching, shopping, eating, drinking and listening to live music.

The art fair entrance is on Monroe Street and Jackson Drive, as well as Monroe and Columbus.

More information here

Taste of Randolph Street in West Loop

Friday, 5-10 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, noon-10 p.m.

With over 16 restaurants along Chicago’s “Restaurant Row,” Chicagoans can try some of the city’s most popular flavors while listening to live music on Randolph Street.

More information here.

Summer Smash Festival at Douglass Park

Friday, 2 p.m.-10 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, noon-10 p.m.

The three-day hip-hop festival will feature rappers like Lil Uzi Vert, Post Malone, Playboi Carti and Wiz Khalifa, as well as food vendors, bars and immersive art experiences.

All bags will be searched upon entry, and backpacks and multi-pocket bags will not be permitted, OEMC noted.

Here are the roads closed due to the event:

  • Friday-June 23: Farrar Drive from 15th Street to 19th Street
  • Friday, June 22: Sacramento Drive from 15th Street to 19th Street
  • Friday-Sunday: Farrar Drive from 12th Place to 15th Street
  • Friday-Sunday: Marshall Avenue from 19th Street to 21st Street
  • Friday-Sunday: 19th Street in California at Marshall Avenue
  • Friday, June 23: Sacramento Drive from 16th Street to 19th Street
  • Friday-Sunday: Ogden Avenue from California to Kedzie

More information here.

Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field

The Cubs face the Atlanta Braves Friday, Saturday and Sunday at 1:20 p.m. at Wrigley Field. Friday will be tie-dye shirt day, while Saturday will have free sunscreen samples for Sun Safety Day.

To buy tickets here.

Ribfest at Wheaton

Friday and Saturday, noon-11 p.m.; Sunday, 12 p.m.-10 p.m., Monday, 12 p.m.-8 p.m.

Ribest returns to the western suburbs for free this weekend at the DuPage County Fairgrounds with artists like Elle King and Illinois native Brett Eldridge performing.

More information here.

The color factory in The Loop

Open Tuesday to Sunday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Located inside the Willis Tower, the new interactive museum has everything from a maze of colors to a “deconstructed movie theater”, interactive and immersive art installations that mix color and sound, and of course, a very large green ball pit.

More information here.

June 16 celebrations

Friday to Sunday

June 16 marks the day all slaves could declare their freedom, two and a half years after former President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation.

In June 2021, Juneteenth became a holiday after President Joe Biden signed it into law.

Find events around Chicago here.

Navy Pier Fireworks

Saturday, 10 p.m.

Navy Pier features a fireworks display every Wednesday and Saturday through Labor Day weekend during the summer. The Saturday show will start at 10 p.m.

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Evan Plotkin named 2022 Citizen of the Year by Springfield Regional Chamber https://russellchatham.com/evan-plotkin-named-2022-citizen-of-the-year-by-springfield-regional-chamber/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 02:19:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/evan-plotkin-named-2022-citizen-of-the-year-by-springfield-regional-chamber/ SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (WGGB/WSHM) — On Wednesday evening, the Springfield Regional Chamber honored Evan Plotkin as the 2022 Springfield Regional Chamber Richard J. Moriarty Citizen of the Year. The award is presented annually to honor the memory of Richard J. Moriarty, a longtime active member of the chamber and an individual who gave his time, talent, […]]]>

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (WGGB/WSHM) — On Wednesday evening, the Springfield Regional Chamber honored Evan Plotkin as the 2022 Springfield Regional Chamber Richard J. Moriarty Citizen of the Year.

The award is presented annually to honor the memory of Richard J. Moriarty, a longtime active member of the chamber and an individual who gave his time, talent, and personal and professional resources to the local community.

Originally from Springfield, Plotkin is one of the main organizers of the Springfield Jazz & Roots Festival and is the force behind Art & Soles.

Western Mass News stopped by Wednesday night to hear Plotkin’s acceptance speech.

“There will be times when you or an organization faces difficulties and challenges, when the outlook is bleak and the road looks like a dead end,” Plotkin said. “A strong, positive and optimistic mindset is needed to start changing the culture of the organization and ultimately its challenges. Great leaders know this. Richard Moriarty knew it.

The Springfield Regional Chamber is a business association representing the region and its geographic center of Springfield and more than 700 businesses of all sizes, providing leadership in creating a healthy business climate.

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Western wildfires force evacuations in Arizona and California https://russellchatham.com/western-wildfires-force-evacuations-in-arizona-and-california/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 04:21:59 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/western-wildfires-force-evacuations-in-arizona-and-california/ FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — The northern Arizona city of Flagstaff is synonymous with mountains — lush with ponderosa pines, meadows and hiking trails that offer respite from the desert heat. Now parts of them are still burning this year, fueled by winds that wiped out overhead resources on Monday. Fire crews were anticipating more moderate […]]]>

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — The northern Arizona city of Flagstaff is synonymous with mountains — lush with ponderosa pines, meadows and hiking trails that offer respite from the desert heat.

Now parts of them are still burning this year, fueled by winds that wiped out overhead resources on Monday. Fire crews were anticipating more moderate winds on Tuesday and throughout the week, which could help them better control the blaze which largely spared homes but headed into a wilderness area and towards a domed volcano of lava.

Townspeople looked towards the mountains as smoke billowed into the air and winds howled, some scared, others nervous – most hoping the humidity in the weekend forecast brings some relief.


“We’re definitely dry,” Flagstaff resident Colin Challifour said Monday night. “The forests are dry. It’s unfortunate. You don’t like to see it.

About 2,500 homes were evacuated due to two wildfires that burned on the outskirts of Flagstaff. A home and secondary structure burned down, the Coconino County Sheriff’s Office said. Hundreds of other people in California and New Mexico have also been forced to flee homes threatened by wildfires.

In northern Arizona, Coconino County has declared an emergency due to the wildfire.

Fire Cmdr. Aaron Graeser said the Flagstaff area fire is one of the nation’s top priorities for firefighting resources. It was estimated at 8 square miles (20 square kilometers) on Monday evening, but fire managers were unable to do aerial mapping.

Two other smaller wildfires northeast of the blaze coalesced, forcing evacuations in a more distant area on Monday.

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A South Asian painter hopes to inspire others to express themselves through art https://russellchatham.com/a-south-asian-painter-hopes-to-inspire-others-to-express-themselves-through-art/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/a-south-asian-painter-hopes-to-inspire-others-to-express-themselves-through-art/ Suruchi Suda says art is in her DNA. So much so that she quit her corporate day job to pursue her passion. Now she hopes other members of the South Asian community might be inspired to try painting themselves. The Airdrie-based artist enjoys painting colorful depictions of popular Indian deities like Krishna and Ganesh, and […]]]>

Suruchi Suda says art is in her DNA.

So much so that she quit her corporate day job to pursue her passion. Now she hopes other members of the South Asian community might be inspired to try painting themselves.

The Airdrie-based artist enjoys painting colorful depictions of popular Indian deities like Krishna and Ganesh, and colorful works that reflect her Indian heritage and upbringing.

“It’s in my DNA. My mom is an artist, my sister is an artist. My mom does embroidery, painting, sewing, everything,” Suda said.

Suda came to Canada nine years ago from northern India. She quit her corporate job four years ago to pursue her dream of being a full-time artist.

Suruchi Suda poses with one of her signature colorful paintings. The Airdrie artist hopes to inspire others to pick up a paintbrush and try art as a hobby. (Submitted by Suruchi Suda)

“At first it was difficult. For a year I had practically nothing to do, but I’m busy now.”

“I am Indian at heart and I like colors, bright colors. Indian subjects like Krishna or Ganesha, they have many shapes and you can imagine them in all the colors. If I put more colors on my canvas it makes me happy and through it I want to spread happiness.”

Suda now sells its colorful paints to customers all over the world. They are also popular with Calgary’s Indo-Canadian community.

“India is a land of colors, so if my subject is Indian, I can put more colors in it. Krishna is a symbol of love and when I paint Krishna, I feel love, I feel blessed myself -even and when he goes to my client I feel like I send them a little love.”

Krishna is one of the most popular gods in Hinduism.

Another favorite subject for Suda is the elephant-headed Hindu god of early times, Ganesh.

Suruchi Suda has always been an artist but decided to follow her passion and go full time four years ago. (Dan McGarvey/CBC)

“Ganesha is worshiped at the beginning of everything, so if you have Ganesha, you have Genesha’s blessings in your home or office. If you see Ganesha around you, you are blessed. Those two topics are my favorite topics,” said she declared.

But his work is not limited to Indian themes. Suda also paints horses and landscapes inspired by her new home in Alberta.

“I paint more South Asian things, so most of my clients are South Asian, but I sell some of my paintings to other communities, paintings other than Indian gods. Just a few months ago, I painted an angel, I also painted a house for a Canadian client, another painting went to an American.

Suruchi Suda rubs shoulders with another colorful array. (Submitted by Suruchi Suda)

Suda says she develops a bond with many of her paintings, which can make it hard to part with them once they’re finished and ready for a client.

“Sometimes I feel so sad and cry even when my paintings are sold. It’s like my baby is passing away, but there’s also happiness that they’re adopted.”

One of Suruchi Suda’s works hangs in his studio in the basement of his house in Airdrie. (Dan McGarvey/CBC)

Suda says she wants to inspire other South Asians to take art seriously as a career. But becoming an artist isn’t on many parents’ radar when it comes to traditional career choices.

“I inspire, I would say, and I get a lot of teaching requests from the community,” Suda said. “When I started painting, I didn’t know if there were other South Asian artists in Calgary, but now they are emerging.

“I was an artist since my childhood but I had no idea that I could make a profession of it because there was no such exhibition. Then I came here and saw other artists selling their paintings and I was like, ‘Why can’t I do this?'”

Suda says other artists have inspired her and influenced her own journey to becoming a full-time painter and she hopes to provide the same inspiration to others.

She is busy painting several commissioned pieces and large canvases.

“I continue to work,” she said.

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