Western Art – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 14:37:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://russellchatham.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2.png Western Art – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ 32 32 Veterans Art Center seeks community help amid roofing issues and lack of funding | Western Colorado https://russellchatham.com/veterans-art-center-seeks-community-help-amid-roofing-issues-and-lack-of-funding-western-colorado/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 14:23:20 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/veterans-art-center-seeks-community-help-amid-roofing-issues-and-lack-of-funding-western-colorado/ Country the United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic […]]]>

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Art exhibition an inspiration to others – The Western Weekender https://russellchatham.com/art-exhibition-an-inspiration-to-others-the-western-weekender/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 03:00:35 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/art-exhibition-an-inspiration-to-others-the-western-weekender/ Susan Oxenham inside the Penrith Regional Gallery, with plants in the garden. Following her long-awaited residency at Penrith Regional Gallery, Emu Plains artist Susan Oxenham has created an exhibition like no other, with sound and texture in mind. Knowing of Ms Oxenham’s four-decade relationship with the Museum, Director of Visual Arts Toby Chapman became determined […]]]>
Susan Oxenham inside the Penrith Regional Gallery, with plants in the garden.

Following her long-awaited residency at Penrith Regional Gallery, Emu Plains artist Susan Oxenham has created an exhibition like no other, with sound and texture in mind.

Knowing of Ms Oxenham’s four-decade relationship with the Museum, Director of Visual Arts Toby Chapman became determined to work with her in a more curatorial way, following the launch of its annual calendar last year.

His exhibition not only takes on his own personal style, but draws inspiration from his surroundings.

“We were really committed and interested in working with Susan as an exhibiting artist, and with her existing aesthetic and interests, we thought it would be a really interesting idea if we encouraged Susan to produce a body of work that meets directly to the garden, both in terms of materiality and spatial navigation experiences,” Mr. Chapman said.

Susan Oxenham.

Since Mrs. Oxenham is legally blind, her experience of the heritage garden is different from most, leading her to develop her art for the exhibition.

In addition to her signature cane paintings, Ms. Oxenham’s exhibition focuses on the non-visual ways we can interact with our environment and includes an ambient soundtrack that was produced by detecting slight electrical variations in plants via electrodes placed on the sheets.

It was while creating this music that the name of the exhibition came to him.

“Sitting there with my micro-cassette recorder while scooping up water from the pond with tadpoles in it, I realized that this kind of joy only happens in those quiet times in nature when you soak up and that’s where the title came to me – ‘Dip in the Senses!’, she says.

When working on her pieces for the exhibition, including two fairly large and dynamic works of art up to three meters wide, Ms Oxenham relied on touch to find out if she was happy with the finished product.

“If there’s a gap in the paint and something is wrong, maybe it’s not meant to be that way. As long as you can feel it, you’ve got it!” she says.

“Sometimes you have to keep playing with things until it works and yet it’s so simple.”

Mr Chapman hopes the exhibition will inspire others, to help him achieve his aim of reinvigorating the Penrith Regional Gallery program so that local talent comes to the fore.

“What I really hope is that other artists in the local community can see Susan’s work and read about her experience working with us, and ideally be able to imagine themselves in her shoes,” he said. he declares.

“There’s this saying that you can only do what you can see, and I appreciate the irony for Susan, but I think she was able to exemplify a way for the gallery to collaborate with local artists.”

“Soak up the senses” will be open until Thursday, November 24.

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William Richard “Bill” Werner, 1939-2022 | News, Sports, Jobs https://russellchatham.com/william-richard-bill-werner-1939-2022-news-sports-jobs/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 06:01:49 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/william-richard-bill-werner-1939-2022-news-sports-jobs/ DOVER – William Richard “Bill” Werner, 83, died on Thursday November 10, 2022 at the Country Club Retirement Home in Dover. He was born on August 8, 1939 in Salem to William Fredrick and Anna Christine Werner. Bill graduated from Salem High School in 1957. He then enlisted in the US Air Force in 1959. […]]]>

DOVER – William Richard “Bill” Werner, 83, died on Thursday November 10, 2022 at the Country Club Retirement Home in Dover.

He was born on August 8, 1939 in Salem to William Fredrick and Anna Christine Werner.

Bill graduated from Salem High School in 1957. He then enlisted in the US Air Force in 1959. In 1984 Bill joined the United States Air Force Reserve. At the time of his retirement in 2005 from the Air Force, he was a Master Sergeant. He served in Desert Storm, the Somali conflict and received numerous awards. He held an associate’s degree in business management technology from Kent State Salem.

He was a member of the Salem Saxon Club, Salem Masonic Temple, Salem AMVETS, American Legion, Emmanuel Lutheran Church, and Two Cylinder Club. He was a hard worker and held various jobs in addition to his military work. He has worked at Mount Union College, Quaker Village, Stambaugh’s, Elks, State Liquor Store, Bliss and Philips Light. For many years, he coached Emmanuel Lutheran Church youth basketball in the church league at the Memorial Building in Salem.

He is survived by his daughter, Heidi Werner (fiancé, Geoff Wray) of Mayflower, Ark.; his son, Richard (Becky) Werner of New Philadelphia; and daughter Ria (Randy) Klinck of Estero, Florida; grandchildren, Izzy Graaf, Bailey Graaf, Sean Graaf, Dakota Graaf, Amelia Werner, Logan Klinck, Chloe Klinck and Mariah Klinck; niece, Ann Kataro and nephew, Steve Kataro; special foster son, Michael Flaata of Columbus; and many nieces, nephews and family members in Doorn, The Netherlands.

He was predeceased by his beloved wife, Leida Werner; an infant son; brothers, Fred and Art Werner; and his sister, Shirley Kataro.

Friends and family will be received on call from 10 a.m. to noon on Wednesday, November 16, 2022 at Emmanuel Lutheran Church, 251 S. Broadway in Salem. A church service will follow immediately, followed by lunch at AMVETS in Salem after the service.

Interment at the Ohio Western Reserve National Cemetery in Rittman will take place at a later date.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Emmanuel Lutheran Church or the Salem Saxon Club Scholarship Fund.

Arrangements are handled by Stark Memorial Funeral Home and Cremation Services.

Condolences can be sent to www.starkmemorial.com.

(special notice)

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Wildcats travel to Idaho to kick off season at NNU Classic https://russellchatham.com/wildcats-travel-to-idaho-to-kick-off-season-at-nnu-classic/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 18:20:39 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/wildcats-travel-to-idaho-to-kick-off-season-at-nnu-classic/ History links ELLENSBURG, Wash. – The Central Washington women’s basketball team is set to open its regular season by competing in the Northwest Nazarene Classic this coming weekend. The Wildcats and Northwest Nazarene Nighthawks will team up and take on two California teams in the Stanislaus State Warriors and California State-East Bay […]]]>

ELLENSBURG, Wash. – The Central Washington women’s basketball team is set to open its regular season by competing in the Northwest Nazarene Classic this coming weekend. The Wildcats and Northwest Nazarene Nighthawks will team up and take on two California teams in the Stanislaus State Warriors and California State-East Bay Pioneers.

GAME INFORMATION

friday november 11e

6:30 p.m.
Central Washington vs. Cal State-East Bay
Johnson Sports Center
Nampa, Idaho

Saturday November 12e

1:30 p.m.
Washington Center vs. Stanislaus State
Johnson Sports Center
Nampa, Idaho

QUOTE HEAD COACH RANDI RICHARDSON-THORNLEY
“We are thrilled to kick off our season in Nampa this weekend,” said Richardson-Thornley. “We are up against two very strong opponents who will challenge us in different ways and I am delighted to see how we will respond and rise to the challenge. Our team has worked hard, has grown a lot already this pre-season, and they are ready to compete.”

COMPETITION SCOUTING
The Pioneers are coming off a historic season where their program clinched the No. 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament while amassing a 24-3 overall record and a 15-1 conference record. The Pioneers fell to national runner-up Western Washington in the regional finals last year. This season so far has seen the Pioneers fall in exhibition action at the University of San Francisco Division 1 79-66.

The Wildcats have two wins over the Pioneers in three tries, the most recent coming last season in the CCAA-GNAC crossover hosted by Stanislaus State. The Wildcats pulled off a 68-55 win over the Pioneers to hand CSU-EB their first loss of the season. Kizzah Maltezo and Samantha Bowman each finished with 20+ points in 25 and 21, respectively, while Bowman had 17 rebounds.

Stanislaus State is hoping to start the new year on the right foot after a 12-10 overall record and a 7-9 conference record. The Warriors finished last season with three straight losses in a tough California Collegiate Athletic Association conference. The Warriors picked up victories over GNAC rivals Northwest Nazarene and Seattle Pacific as well as NCAA Tournament entrant Academy of Art.

The Wildcats and Warriors have seen each other a bit more, meeting seven times with CWU stealing five of those matchups in their favor, and the Wildcats are currently riding a four-game winning streak against the Warriors. Last year, the ‘Cats traveled to Turlock, Calif., where Stanislaus State hosted the CCAA-GNAC crossover. It was a hard-fought battle as the ‘Cats sealed a 67-66 victory thanks to the offensive rebounding prowess that is Samantha Bowman. Bowman scored a stellar 23 points and 23 rebounds while Kassidy Malcolm poured in 15 more runs in the CWU win.

LOOK AHEAD

After the Northwest Nazarene Classic, the ‘Cats will turn their attention to two other teams they know well in the Metro State Roadrunners and the Westminster Griffins in Salt Lake City, Utah. CWU went 1-2 last year against the Roadrunners and Griffins losing in Ellensburg to MSU while parting ways with Westminster falling at the NNU Classic before taking revenge at the CWU tournament.

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Things to do in Cincinnati this week: November 7-13 https://russellchatham.com/things-to-do-in-cincinnati-this-week-november-7-13/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 03:04:37 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/things-to-do-in-cincinnati-this-week-november-7-13/ Monday, November 7 CHARITY: The Harry James Orchestra, Ballroom of the Music Hall, Outre-Rhin. The dance floor will be open. WMKV/WLHS advantages. $35, $30 upfront. Tuesday, November 8 MUSIC: Live music at lunch: Brussels sprouts, 12:10 p.m., Christ Church Cathedral, 318 E. Fourth St., Downtown. Free. MUSIC: Too many Zooz, Woodward Theatre. With Yam Yam. […]]]>

Monday, November 7

CHARITY: The Harry James Orchestra, Ballroom of the Music Hall, Outre-Rhin. The dance floor will be open. WMKV/WLHS advantages. $35, $30 upfront.

Tuesday, November 8

MUSIC: Live music at lunch: Brussels sprouts, 12:10 p.m., Christ Church Cathedral, 318 E. Fourth St., Downtown. Free.

MUSIC: Too many Zooz, Woodward Theatre. With Yam Yam.

Wednesday, November 9

FILM: “Meet Me in the Bathroom” 7:30 p.m., Woodward Theatre, 1404 Main Street, Over-the-Rhine. $12.

MUSIC: Mania – Tribute to ABBA, Taft Theatre.

Thursday November 10

COMEDY: Comedic hypnotist Rich Guzzi, Funny Bone Comedy Club, 7518 Bales St., Liberty Township. One night only. freedom.funnybone.com.

COMEDY: Nate Craig, Go Bananas Comedy Club, 8410 Market Place Lane, Montgomery. From November 10 to 13. gobananascomedy.com.

COMEDY: My brother, my brother and me, Taft Theatre.

MUSIC: Puscifer, Andrew J. Brady Music Center.

MUSIC: Fun Lovin’ Criminals, Ludlow Garage.

Friday November 11

ART: arch, fourth wall, balance, 6-9 p.m., Manifest Gallery, 2727 Woodburn Ave., Walnut Hills. Three separate exhibits. From Nov. 11 to Dec. 11 9. Free.

COMEDY: Donnie Baker, Funny Bone Comedy Club, 7518 Bales St., Liberty Township. From November 11 to 12. freedom.funnybone.com.

CRAFT SHOW: Greater Cincinnati Holiday Market, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, Duke Energy Convention Center, 525 Elm St., Downtown. General admission $12. $25 VIP, $15 Early Bird, $6 Girls Night. cincinnatiholidaymarket.com.

The Greater Cincinnati Holiday Market takes place Friday through Sunday at the Duke Energy Convention Center.

DANCE: Step Afrika, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Hall Auditorium, University of Miami, 101 S. Campus Ave., Oxford. $22, $21 seniors, $11 students. Miamioh.edu.

HOLIDAYS: Holiday Junction, Cincinnati Museum Center, 1301 Western Ave., Queensgate. Opening November 11. $10 or $5 with the purchase of any other museum experience. Cincymuseum.org.

HOLIDAYS: Nights of Lights, Coney Island, Anderson Township. From Nov. 11 to Jan. 2. coneyislandpark.com.

HOLIDAYS: light up the fair, Boone County Fairgrounds, 5819 Idlewild Road, Burlington. Northern Kentucky’s only drive-in light show. Now over two miles long. From Nov. 11 to Dec. 11 31. $15 per pair, $25 per carload. lightupthefair.com.

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A vote to support the progress of the Dali Museum https://russellchatham.com/a-vote-to-support-the-progress-of-the-dali-museum/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 10:11:37 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/a-vote-to-support-the-progress-of-the-dali-museum/ The Dalí is a non-profit art museum and has long been a cultural jewel in the crown of St. Petersburg. Opening in 1982 and then moving to its current location in 2011, the museum has propelled the growth of the arts in St. Pete, including the opening and growth of many new museums over the […]]]>

The Dalí is a non-profit art museum and has long been a cultural jewel in the crown of St. Petersburg. Opening in 1982 and then moving to its current location in 2011, the museum has propelled the growth of the arts in St. Pete, including the opening and growth of many new museums over the past decade, as evidenced by a recent article from the New York Times. The Museum generates considerable tourist traffic and is also popular with local residents. Recent opposition to the proposed expansion, which is at no cost to the public, is puzzling.

Tom James

In 2019, the Departmental Commission of Pinellas, on the recommendation of the Tourism Development Board, approved a grant for capital expenditure for the Dalí Museum to expand its building to increase its spaces for education, community programming and digital art galleries, in addition to increasing parking. This capital grant program is part of a semi-annual county grant, which provides funding to cultural and sports organizations that have a proven track record of driving economic growth in the county.

Dalí’s project was revised in 2020 to meet the needs of neighboring organizations, including the Mahaffey Theatre. The new design no longer includes parking, despite the fact that the Museum could use it. The new design is also on a smaller footprint – a 40-foot-wide strip connected to the Museum on the west side of the building. While the land on either side is part of Dalí’s 99-year renewable lease with the city, this small strip between is currently owned by the city and so a referendum is included in the November 8 ballot to change the lease and make advance the museum’s expansion project. .

Dalí’s expansion plan takes full account of the needs of the Mahaffey Theatre, and the referendum includes specific language to protect the Mahaffey during construction. With the amenities the Dalí has ​​made for his neighbors, it is surprising that anyone would object to a project that will enrich arts education and foster the cultural growth that is taking place in our community. The referendum was crafted by city employees and unanimously supported by city council, and if passed, lease changes are still subject to the operational needs of the Mahaffey Theater and other partners. Additionally, the theater was operational when the Dalí built its current structure, a much larger project in 2009-2011, with no disruption to Mahaffey operations.

Dalí’s proposed expansion does not require funding from the city or local taxpayers and offers a host of benefits, including increased educational space to complement the K-12 curriculum, additional economic impact on the region, and offers new immersive ways to experience art – all of which will spur innovation, arts education, and connections to the St. Petersburg community. If the referendum passes, it is only the first step in ongoing discussions with the City, the Mahaffey and other organizations in the area on how to move forward in a mutually beneficial manner.

I have served on the board of the Dalí Museum since 1987, serving as its president (1994-2017), while the new building was designed, financed and built closer to the heart of Saint Petersburg. In 2017, I founded the James Museum of Western & Wildlife Art in downtown St. Petersburg, in addition to contributing to many other art institutions in the region. I have also supported the Mahaffey Theater since its inception and believe that both institutions are valuable parts of downtown St. Petersburg. We are stronger together and must work together. Dalí’s establishment in this community is the driving force behind the overall cultural success and is one of the main reasons why St. Petersburg has become a must-visit artistic destination. A rising tide lifts all boats – we must support everyone’s success and growth. Vote yes, let the Dalí expand and continue St. Petersburg’s flourishing artistic evolution.

Tom James is a board member of the Dali Museum. He was previously CEO and Chairman of the Board of Raymond James, the financial services company. He remains on the company’s board of directors.

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The Briscoe Western Art Museum will host a Q&A with the producer of ‘Deep in the Heart’ https://russellchatham.com/the-briscoe-western-art-museum-will-host-a-qa-with-the-producer-of-deep-in-the-heart/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 22:01:21 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/the-briscoe-western-art-museum-will-host-a-qa-with-the-producer-of-deep-in-the-heart/ SAN ANTONIO – Embark on a stunning visual journey into the hidden natural wonders of the Lone Star State. The Briscoe Western Art Museum is hosting a screening of the film “Deep in the Heart,” narrated by Mathew McConaughey, at 6 p.m. on November 10. The evening includes an exclusive Q&A with the film’s producer, […]]]>

SAN ANTONIO – Embark on a stunning visual journey into the hidden natural wonders of the Lone Star State.

The Briscoe Western Art Museum is hosting a screening of the film “Deep in the Heart,” narrated by Mathew McConaughey, at 6 p.m. on November 10.

The evening includes an exclusive Q&A with the film’s producer, Katy Bladock.

Katy Bladock, producer of “Deep in the Heart” (Briscoe Museum of Western Art)

The 2022 film, which received a 100% rating on rotten tomatoesexplores the Texas countryside, highlighting the state’s native wildlife, plants, and sea life.

The documentary aims to show the importance of conserving our remaining natural spaces across Texas, according to a press release.

Photographs taken in the film “Deep in the Heart”. (Briscoe Museum of Western Art)
Photographs taken in the film “Deep in the Heart”. (Briscoe Museum of Western Art)
Photographs taken in the film “Deep in the Heart”. (Briscoe Museum of Western Art)
Photographs taken in the film “Deep in the Heart”. (Briscoe Museum of Western Art)

Briscoe’s ‘Deep in the Heart’ film screening is $14 and pre-registration is recommended on line.

Briscoe members receive free admission and snacks at the cinema.

Also on KSAT.com:

Copyright 2022 by KSAT – All rights reserved.

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Location Changes for New CMU Performance Theater | Western Colorado https://russellchatham.com/location-changes-for-new-cmu-performance-theater-western-colorado/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 19:09:20 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/location-changes-for-new-cmu-performance-theater-western-colorado/ Country the United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic […]]]>

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Jorge Tacla at the Cristin Tierney Gallery, New York – ARTnews.com https://russellchatham.com/jorge-tacla-at-the-cristin-tierney-gallery-new-york-artnews-com/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 18:23:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/jorge-tacla-at-the-cristin-tierney-gallery-new-york-artnews-com/ Faced with visitors arriving at this small but striking exhibition of works by Jorge Tacla is a painting of a large plinth, deprived of its famous subject. A pair of spectral gray spots rise from the plinth – at the base of which the viewer is placed in perspective – as a vague allusion to […]]]>

Faced with visitors arriving at this small but striking exhibition of works by Jorge Tacla is a painting of a large plinth, deprived of its famous subject. A pair of spectral gray spots rise from the plinth – at the base of which the viewer is placed in perspective – as a vague allusion to this absence. With its neo-baroque ornamentation stirred by the artist’s signature blurry brushstroke, part of his cold wax technique, the monument offers no clues as to its precise location. The title of the table, Occult Identity 160 (Hidden Identity 160, 2021), confirms this anonymity. But even in its solitude and the generic blue of its sky, the site hardly stands out from the news.

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On a step from the foundation of the structure appears the word lives, barely noticeable amid other scrawls of illegible graffiti, but making the pedestal instantly recognizable – not as a specific site, but as part of global protests demanding justice for ongoing police violence against black bodies; it is a makeshift monument to all-too-common brutality. The vacant pedestal also evokes the ongoing discourse (to understate its frequent vitriol) about removing statues of white supremacists and slave owners. Tacla uses a finely honed combination of linework and color washes to create hazy, turbulent surfaces, a formal quality that underscores the ideological tenor of his imagery. The incessant agitation of his paintings gives even the most seemingly inert matter a sense of historical urgency.

If the bodies are absent from Occult Identity 160they are the sole object of Injury Report 22 (2022). Blindfolded, with clenched fists and open mouth – presumably in a collective chant – a group of women marched in the open air in what can only be a political demonstration, carried out in a public space, presumably urban, given the faint outlines of buildings in the background. Despite the threatening deep red sky, no injuries were visible. But the picture’s sense of impending violence erupts in Injury Report 17 (2022). Lying on the ground in a more compact and shallow space, a figure is either helped up or pushed down. Other indistinct figures surround him, one of whom holds out his arm in a sign of help or aggression. Bordering on abstraction, the striated tumult of the bodies is further blurred by drips of crimson pigment, both immanent to the scene and also a pictorial event accumulating on the surface of the painting. The canvas itself seems a bloody victim of the same demonstration.

Mottled black and white image of a group of blindfolded women walking with their mouths open as if singing, and a dark red background in the upper third of the image.

Jorge Tacla: Injury Report 222022, oil and cold wax on canvas, 30 by 40 inches.

Courtesy of Cristin Tierney Gallery, New York

Although these works are still widespread, images like October 25 #4, 2019 and October 25 #5, 2019 (both from 2022) evoke through their titles recent episodes in the political life of the artist’s native Chile, with protesting crowds, still totally anonymous, constituting the formal raw material of the images. The latter divides his multitudes into six large monochromatic sections surrounding a central rectangle of bright red: an architectural sketch of a street lined with buildings, possibly representing a site of trouble. The first work mixes body and urban landscape: a monument at the heart of the painting appears engulfed by flags and bodies that have snatched its historical importance for their own purposes. The flags appear as unreadable as the locale is indescribable. October 25 is the date of one of the largest mass protests in Chile’s history, which took place in Santiago in 2019 in response to the rising cost of living and social inequality, but l The vagueness of the scenes connects them to larger, contemporary global manifestations (like the Black Lives Matter Demonstrations his other images allude to). The expressly tangled faces and bodies in Tacla’s paintings create the distance one expects from a memory or a dream; their studied imprecision inflects their presence with the fleeting temporality of the ruins. The artist does not seem to take sides per se. But the fact of these demonstrations, this mixture of bodies in space in agitation for change, testifies to a vital human need, increasingly threatened. And the selection of events to which its titles refer, among which the explosion of Beirut in 2020 (in a set of paintings not presented here), indicates a sociopolitical orientation.

A smudged black and white image of the classic architecture that is the United States Capitol, with a muted red background.

Jorge Tacla: Injury Report 162022, oil and cold wax on canvas, 49 by 71½ inches.

Courtesy of Cristin Tierney Gallery, New York

Even more striking than the artist’s expressly civic images are these urban landscapes evacuated of any identifiable human presence but charged with its effects. The United States Capitol stands at an oblique angle in Injury Report 16 (2022), in full allusion to the insurrection of January 6, 2021. Its nondescript buildings bathed in an ash red uniform, Occult Identity 163 (2022) suggests, with smoke or fire billowing from a burning central edifice, an unidentified country in political turmoil. Instead of his usual wax and pigments, the artist has added marble powder here, which gives the painting more substance and an eerie material gravity. The fact that the conceptual space between the sites named by Tacla – the beacon of Western democracy and “freedom”, the foreign shores where America sponsored illegitimate coups, and the monuments closer to home where an acute lack of freedom is named – has shrunk so drastically underscores the horrendous state of populist politics. Such is the subtle realization of Tacla’s painting: with this exhibition, he confirms his presence among those few contemporary figurative painters, from the late Juan Genovés to Julie Mehretu, still worthy of the title of “history painter”.

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HUB-Robeson Galleries presents the DREAMS exhibition with an artist talk on November 14 https://russellchatham.com/hub-robeson-galleries-presents-the-dreams-exhibition-with-an-artist-talk-on-november-14/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 18:23:32 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/hub-robeson-galleries-presents-the-dreams-exhibition-with-an-artist-talk-on-november-14/ UNIVERSITY PARK, Pennsylvania – HUB-Robeson Galleries presents DREAMS, an exhibition of film performances, ceramic sculptures and installations by New York artist duo AYDO (A young Yu & Nicholas Oh). DREAMS will be presented at the HUB gallery from November 11 to March 5. The artists will speak from 3-4 p.m. on November 14 at the […]]]>

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pennsylvania – HUB-Robeson Galleries presents DREAMS, an exhibition of film performances, ceramic sculptures and installations by New York artist duo AYDO (A young Yu & Nicholas Oh). DREAMS will be presented at the HUB gallery from November 11 to March 5. The artists will speak from 3-4 p.m. on November 14 at the Palmer Lipton Auditorium as part of the School of Visual Arts John M. Anderson Endowed Conference. Series. The talk will be followed by a reception celebrating their work from 5-7pm at the HUB Gallery, HUB-Robeson Center. Both events are open to everyone.

DREAMS explores ancestral and personal dreams through sculptural and video installations. Ancestral dreams refer to the experiences of the artists’ ancestors, which they evoke and ponder through ritual-based spiritual practices centered on themes of generational trauma, family and diaspora.

Through performance-based film and site-specific installation, AYDO reimagines Korean folklore and pre-colonial spiritual practices to reflect personal and Asian American perspectives. They are not faithful to the historical canon and transgress older traditions, regenerating them in diasporic contexts through methods of disruption and transformation. Performances are filmed in spaces ranging from ritual spaces and temples to sites of colonization and ongoing political tension, from defaced buildings and unmarked graves to immersive studio-constructed environments. They activate these spaces by distilling narratives and visual cues from our heritage and, through processes of reimagining, create new stories. New stories explore themes of race, Western imperialism, gender, sexuality and migration.

Nicholas Oh received his MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design. He has been named artist-in-residence at Pioneer Works, Anderson Ranch Arts Center, Sculpture Space, and Shigaraki Cultural Park. He has also taught at the Rhode Island School of Design, Bennington College, Sacramento State University and Oxfordshire Arts.

A young Yu earned her MFA in Visual Arts from Columbia University. She received the Bronx Museum of the Arts: Artist in the Marketplace Fellowship; AHL-T&W Foundation Gold Award, Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation Individual Artist Fellowship and was nominated for the Rema Hort Mann Foundation Emerging Artist Fellowship.

For more information about this exhibit and others, contact HUB-Robeson Galleries at (814) 865-2563, or visit studentaffairs.psu.edu/hub/art-galleries. Visits from classes, student organizations and offices to the gallery are welcome. Email Galleries@psu.edu with any inquiries. Stay up to date with HUB-Robeson Galleries by signing up to the mailing list or following @hubrobesongalleries on Instagram.

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