Oil Paintings – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ Tue, 05 Jul 2022 10:20:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://russellchatham.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2.png Oil Paintings – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ 32 32 “Harmony is never a symmetry”: the curator of the Fondation Beyeler’s Mondrian exhibition on what made the artist vibrate https://russellchatham.com/harmony-is-never-a-symmetry-the-curator-of-the-fondation-beyelers-mondrian-exhibition-on-what-made-the-artist-vibrate/ Tue, 05 Jul 2022 10:13:38 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/harmony-is-never-a-symmetry-the-curator-of-the-fondation-beyelers-mondrian-exhibition-on-what-made-the-artist-vibrate/ Piet Mondrian – the Dutch painter synonymous with rigidly gridded abstractions– never used a ruler, it turns out. It was one of many revelations underlined by the restorers of the Fondation Beyeler in Basel, Switzerland, who have concluded a multi-year program research project which preceded a retrospective by the famous artist, which is on view […]]]>

Piet Mondrian – the Dutch painter synonymous with rigidly gridded abstractions– never used a ruler, it turns out.

It was one of many revelations underlined by the restorers of the Fondation Beyeler in Basel, Switzerland, who have concluded a multi-year program research project which preceded a retrospective by the famous artist, which is on view until October.

Mondrian “made marks around the edges, then very slowly painted those lines. They look precise but they are based on intuition,” said Ulf Kuster, who curated the exhibit. For the Dutch artist, painting was a “long process of looking, composing, erasing”, explains the curator.

The neo-plastician’s greatest hits abound with myriad right angles and intersecting lines, so it’s hard to believe he didn’t use help. But Mondrian’s reluctance to use a ruler says more about his dogmatic — and often arduous — approach to art, Kuster pointed out.

Piet Mondrian, Composition with yellow and blue (1932). © Mondrian/Holtzman Trust
Photo: Robert Bayer, Basel.

“I really learned that [Mondrian] was a painter who was always in control of what he was doing,” the curator said of his experience working on the exhibit. “I hadn’t realized how laborious this painting process must have been for him and how much he looked at things and how much he thought about the painting.”

“Mondrian Evolution” is the name of Kuster’s exhibition, which marks the 150th anniversary of the artist’s birth. It also doubles as a description of what viewers can expect at The Beyeler: a toe-to-toe survey of Mondrian’s career, beginning with his younger endeavors in portraiture and landscape.

These early paintings, completed in the Netherlands just before and after the turn of the 19th century, bear no resemblance to those for which he would later become known. But it’s also not difficult to spot shared DNA strands. See, for example, his numerous studies of whirling windmills and multi-branched trees: it is clear that already at that time the artist was trying to translate into oil paint the geometry that governs the world that surrounds us.

“He was looking for harmony, but harmony is never symmetry,” Kuster said. “Harmony must have a tension in time.”

Piet Mondrian, mill in the sun (1908). © 2022 Mondrian/Holtzman Trust. Photo: Kunstmuseum Den Haag.

With exposure to painters like Picasso and Pointedand a years-long stay in Paris, abstraction began to permeate Mondrian’s canvases around 1911. His once representative scenes of Dutch waterways dissolved into Cubist abstractions which, while remaining based in the lived worldemphasizing form over substance.

Over the next decade he returned to the Netherlands, then returned to Paris. Its vaguely painted cubes turned into hard rectangles; its fresh Fauvist-inspired palette has been replaced by solid bands of color. The style that would come to be known as “De Stijl” was born.

From classical figuration to cutting-edge abstraction, the full trajectory of Mondrian’s work on display at the Beyeler reflects the evolution of modernism itself. However, the Dutch artist also shows us the importance of looking beyond this familiar story, Kuster pointed out.

“Mondrian is someone who teaches you a lot about painting,” the curator said, showing his own affection for the artist. “The very art-historical – and in many ways useful – idea that modern art is a development from figuration to abstraction is acceptable, but it’s not really interesting for artists.”

“For an artist,” Kuster continued, “it doesn’t matter if it’s figurative or non-figurative, because it’s always abstract. It’s always abstract, because painting is abstraction.

Check out some of the highlights of “Mondrian Evolution” below:

Piet Mondrian, No. VI / Composition No. II (1920). © 2021 Mondrian/Holtzman Trust
Photo: Tate.

Piet Mondrian, The red cloud (1907). © 2022 Mondrian/Holtzman Trust. Photo: Kunstmuseum Den Haag.

Piet Mondrian, Bell tower of the Domburg church (1911). © 2022 Mondrian/Holtzman Trust
Photo: Kunstmuseum Den Haag.

Piet Mondrian, Windmill in the evening (1917). © 2022 Mondrian/Holtzman Trust. Photo: Kunstmuseum Den Haag.

Piet Mondrian, Wood near Oele (1908). © 2022 Mondrian/Holtzman Trust. Photo: Kunstmuseum Den Haag.

Piet Mondrian, apple blossom (1912).
© 2022 Mondrian/Holtzman Trust
Photo: Kunstmuseum Den Haag.

Piet Mondrian, Diamond Composition with Eight Lines and Red / Image No. III (1938). © Mondrian/Holtzman Trust
Photo: Robert Bayer, Basel.

Mondrian Evolutionis on view until October 9, 2022 at the Fondation Beyeler in Basel, Switzerland.

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William Wegman goes from canine portraits to chaotic abstractions https://russellchatham.com/william-wegman-goes-from-canine-portraits-to-chaotic-abstractions/ Sun, 03 Jul 2022 07:01:06 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/william-wegman-goes-from-canine-portraits-to-chaotic-abstractions/ Reader alert. If you are a pet owner given to seeing animals as people you should skip this comment. The models as a photographer William Wegmanis famous The portraits were never human. Instead, he imagined dogs in people’s clothes, saying he saw dogs as individuals and dressed them accordingly. go monkey Projecting human pathways onto […]]]>

Reader alert. If you are a pet owner given to seeing animals as people you should skip this comment.

The models as a photographer William Wegmanis famous The portraits were never human. Instead, he imagined dogs in people’s clothes, saying he saw dogs as individuals and dressed them accordingly.

go monkey

Projecting human pathways onto non-humans looks a bit like the monkeys from the 2001 movie “Planet of the Apes” dominating a race of primitive humans.

Sure, waltz disney projected human traits onto animals all the time. The fawn in the 1942 film “Bambi” is shown joining his friends – a rabbit and a skunk – to explore the woods like curious children.

But wait.

Wegman now makes art without a dog in sight in his current exhibition at Sperone Westwater At New York. Even so, it’s hard to talk about him without mentioning his dog photos. Art in America captioned his review of his New York show, “Who took the dogs out?”

Emily Watlingtonassociate editor of Art in America, calls the absence of dogs “an attempt to remind viewers that, despite his reputation as a titular dog portraitist, Wegman is actually a serious artist.

I’m not so sure. One of the works featured a abstract acrylic and charcoal on titled wood “OMG 2021” which bears a strong resemblance to John Marin’s chaotic abstract oil paintings with their watercolour-like appearance, said to have inspired abstract expressionism.

But Watlington had a different view Wegman“OMG 2021.” Instead of a chaotic abstraction, she saw “a suburban home that has just been ravaged by a climate catastrophe.” In this case, MarineThe work also deals with climate catastrophe. The similarity is so strong.

Everything that has been said about Wegmanthe non-canine work of , his portraits of dogs are still in the Sperone Westwater show – a retro of his work from the early 70s to the present, which includes drawings, paintings and videos.

And, as long as Wegman continues to show canines disguised as humans – actually say that dogs aren’t good enough as they are – I’ll keep complaining about that.

Sperone Westwaterwebsite is excused WegmanThe sneering dog photos of him are an example of him “pushing holes in the more stuffy, academic art world.” In my opinion, it makes holes in the nobility of animals.

Serious artist?

Unaware of this nobility, Watlington not only recognizes that “stupid human sports outfits”, but also uses dog photos as a standard for praising Wegmanwork of the last days, calling it “equally goofy”, adding “thank goodness”.

Clearly the Art in America the publisher agrees to make animals the target of to jokes.

More jokes. Watlington enthuses over a drawing by Wegman of two men, one with a pipe, the other with a cigarette, captioned “Twins with individual tastes. She wonders if the drawing is meant to be a work of art or just a joke. The decides: “Who cares?” It’s funny.”

of his way of writing, Watlington is big on irreverence, especially toward what she calls the “self-righteous didacticism that so easily follows the pretense of a “artistic vision”. She labels it “self-centered”.

Looks like this Art in America editor is burnt out – raw.

© ALL RIGHTS RESERVED







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The Blowing Rock Art & History Museum will host the fifth annual Blowing Rock Plein Air Festival https://russellchatham.com/the-blowing-rock-art-history-museum-will-host-the-fifth-annual-blowing-rock-plein-air-festival/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 17:56:25 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/the-blowing-rock-art-history-museum-will-host-the-fifth-annual-blowing-rock-plein-air-festival/ The Blowing Rock Art & History Museum will host its annual Blowing Rock Plein Air Festival from August 16-20, 2022, ending with the Wet Paint Sale on August 20, 2022, from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Look out for August 16-20 and you might spot dozens of artists painting outdoors at the fifth annual Blowing […]]]>

The Blowing Rock Art & History Museum will host its annual Blowing Rock Plein Air Festival from August 16-20, 2022, ending with the Wet Paint Sale on August 20, 2022, from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Look out for August 16-20 and you might spot dozens of artists painting outdoors at the fifth annual Blowing Rock Plein Air festival. “Plein Air” is a French term referring to the practice of painting from nature and outdoor nature. BRAHM will again welcome 120 artists from more than fifteen states to draw and paint the many sites and splendours of the region. In addition to watching the artists at work during the 5-day festival, BRAHM invites the public to view and purchase the Wet Paint Sale on Saturday, August 20, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tickets are free, but timed entry seating must be reserved online. The sale will take place at BRAHM’s Alexander Community Gallery, located at 159 Ginny Stevens Lane, off Main Street in Blowing Rock.

The Wet Paint Sale is the culmination of the work of artists painting the scenes of the quaint village of Blowing Rock, as well as the stunning views, lakes, trails and features of Blue Ridge Parkway. Artists can work in any two-dimensional medium, with oil paint being the most popular. (Since oil paint often takes days or even weeks to dry to the touch, paintings that are still wet are framed and hung for display and sale, hence the name Wet Paint Sale.) Participating artists range from collectors to amateurs to professionals, ensuring there will be art available for purchase in a wide range of prices. Proceeds from the sale of wet paint go towards BRAHM’s mission to bring cultural enrichment to High Country communities by promoting the arts and the heritage and history of Southern Appalachia through educational programs, exhibits , activities and permanent collections. Proceeds also benefit BRAHM’s educational outreach programs. What better way to celebrate the purchase of your new home, remember a vacation destination, or give a gift to treasure for decades, than to support the arts and artists by purchasing original creations at the Wet Paint Dirty.

To learn more about the 2022 Blowing Rock Plein Air Festival and to register for the Wet Paint Sale on August 20, please visit BlowingRockPleinAir.org or call 828-295-9099.

Thanks to 2022 Blowing Rock Plein Air Festival Sponsors:

Blown Rock Properties

Cheap Joes Art Stuff

hemlock inn

Blowing Rock Monkee

Patti Turner, Chief Broker, Premier Sotheby’s International Realty

Sue Glenn, Associate Broker, Blowing Rock Properties

The Blowing Rock.

BRAHM (Blowing Rock Art & History Museum) is an art and history museum nestled in the mountains of North Carolina. Opened to the public in 2011, BRAHM provides cultural enrichment by promoting the arts, heritage, and history of Southern Appalachia, through educational programs, exhibits, activities, and permanent collections.

BRAHM is located in downtown Blowing Rock and is open to the public, free of charge, on Tuesdays. – Sat. 11-5 and Sun. 11-4.

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Mountain Trails Gallery Presents “The Spark of Life as Art” for First Friday https://russellchatham.com/mountain-trails-gallery-presents-the-spark-of-life-as-art-for-first-friday/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 10:05:45 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/mountain-trails-gallery-presents-the-spark-of-life-as-art-for-first-friday/ My Best Friend by Sarah Phippen, Oil 24×36 The Mountain Trails Gallery at Tlaquepaque in Sedona presents “The Spark of Life as Art” exhibit which opens on the first Friday, July 1 with a reception from 4-7pm. The gallery celebrates this special weekend and month of July by honoring those who recognize that creating beauty […]]]>

My Best Friend by Sarah Phippen, Oil 24×36

The Mountain Trails Gallery at Tlaquepaque in Sedona presents “The Spark of Life as Art” exhibit which opens on the first Friday, July 1 with a reception from 4-7pm.

The gallery celebrates this special weekend and month of July by honoring those who recognize that creating beauty through art is a special gift. Whether it’s telling stories about history, ranch life, Native American culture, western wildlife, a single rose, or the stark beauty of a Grand Canyon or Sedona landscape, these beauty creators get us noticed.

Photo

Falling in love with the American West for Susan Kliewer began by drawing horses and painting the landscapes she saw in magazines found on her grandmother’s table. Susan was also inspired by her talented father, a park ranger who raised fire prevention awareness with his mascot “Smokey Bear”. But it was later in her life, working in an art foundry for other famous sculptors, that this award-winning artist found her own voice and began to create her own sculptures from her experiences of Native American cultures. she had come to know and love. .

Accustomed to drawing, the Western realist Vicki Catapano was schooled in the tradition of the buckaroo with horse riding and customs. She also encountered Native American dancers from various tribes whom she later honored in several of her paintings.

And third-generation sculptor Dustin Payne was immersed in ranching, “playing” with clay and reading Western action stories that came to life in his hands. He sold his first sculpture when he was eight years old and was recently one of the youngest to be honored as a member of the Cowboy Artists of America.

The daughter of a professional artist, Susanne Nyberg has made art all her life and her relentless passion for the exceptional landscapes of the desert southwest has thrust her into the limelight with her oil and with a knife in the open air.

Photo

Award-winning landscape painter Bill Cramer has always had an interest in exploring nature and creating art.

Western contemporary landscape and wildlife painter Tamara Rymer has been drawing and painting since she can remember. His father brought home paper, crayons, paints and art books as he told stories of the family’s history straight from their Native American and Wild West roots, which continue to inspire this intriguing artist.

For painter Marcia Molnar, her natural ability was nurtured by her artist/gallery owner father where this budding artist spent her time.

Driven by a passion to tell the heartfelt story of a working ranch in Arizona, multi-generational rancher Shawn Cameron began painting the truth of what she saw and experienced. The honest giving of life shines through in each of Shawn’s paintings which poetically capture animals and ranchers working the land, as she continues to receive recognition from many prestigious organizations.

Animal artist and rancher Sarah Phippen was inspired by her grandfather George Phippen, a prominent Western artist and one of the original founders of the Cowboy Artists of American organization. Surrounded by inspiration, Sarah couldn’t help but forge her own path in pursuit of a creative life.

Self-taught still life artist Sue Krzyston found a way to share the beauty of creation with others as she studied history and continued collecting Native American historical artifacts.

Animal artists Jeremy Bradshaw, Raymond Gibby, Mark Edward Adams and Bryce Pettit have found their way to sculpture from fascinating backgrounds in other fields including science, biology and falconry. Contemporary expressionist painter Greg Dye sums it all up: “Every day is a new day, with new possibilities waiting to form in my imagination, as the emotional energy of a day pours onto the canvas.

Many of the artists in the Mountain Trails Gallery have compelling stories that have helped them create memorable works of art for the world to enjoy. Find out more by visiting our website. Mountain Trails Gallery Sedona, located at 336 SR 179, Suite A201 in Tlaquepaque, is proud to exhibit the work of over 50 extraordinary artists working in painting, sculpture and fine art, as they all contribute to make this gallery a destination for collectors, enthusiasts and visitors from all over the world.

For more information, contact the gallery at 928-282-3225, fineart@mountaintrailssedona.com, mountaintrailssedona.com.

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Carson City Jazz Festival Announces Art Contest Winner https://russellchatham.com/carson-city-jazz-festival-announces-art-contest-winner/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 16:24:03 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/carson-city-jazz-festival-announces-art-contest-winner/ Mike Bond shows off his winning art for the 2022 Jazz & Beyond – Carson City Music and Art Festival poster. Mike Bond is the winner of the Jazz & Beyond Carson City Music and Art Festival 2022 poster and program cover competition, according to a press release.Its design, “Jazz Guitar”, was selected from 10 […]]]>

Mike Bond shows off his winning art for the 2022 Jazz & Beyond – Carson City Music and Art Festival poster.

Mike Bond is the winner of the Jazz & Beyond Carson City Music and Art Festival 2022 poster and program cover competition, according to a press release.
Its design, “Jazz Guitar”, was selected from 10 entries to highlight the 19th Annual Carson City Music and Arts Festival. An honorable mention goes to 11-year-old Jasmine Sanchez for her entries, “Jazzy Uno” and “Jazzy Dos.”
Bond is an artist who lives in Sparks. He is known for his oil paintings of landscapes and western scenes. He will present his work on the Open Studios Tour on August 20 and 21 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Nevada State Museum as part of the 17-day Jazz & Beyond Music and Art Festival.
Jazz & Beyond will offer several free concerts at numerous venues in Carson City, opening with the Reno Jazz Orchestra on Friday, August 5, outdoors at Governor’s Mansion. A country-themed day at Silver Saddle Ranch will be held on Saturday, August 13. The festival will end with the Mile High Jazz Band on Count Basie’s birthday, August 21, at the Capital Amphitheater.
The festival will include a three-day Open Studios Tour from Friday August 19 to Sunday August 21 with more than 20 artists demonstrating their work in nine locations. This year they include private studios, the Carson City Historical Society’s Carriage House, the Nevada State Museum and, on Fridays only, the Historic Bliss Mansion.
Each artist will have one or more works exhibited at the Nevada Artists Association Gallery, 449 W. King St., from July 30 through September 9 as part of the NAA Summer Show.
For more information contact Elinor Bugli at 775-883-4154 or info@jazzcarsoncity.com

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The Gumboot exhibition redefines the graphic language https://russellchatham.com/the-gumboot-exhibition-redefines-the-graphic-language/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/the-gumboot-exhibition-redefines-the-graphic-language/ Andrea Pratt’s Spiral Notebook is open to the public at the Gumboot Café in Roberts Creek until June 30. Select works are displayed on her website at www.andreapratt.com and on Instagram at @andreaprattart. Works by Langdale painter Andrea Pratt that encompass iconographic representations of spirituality and ecology are featured at the Gumboot Café in Roberts […]]]>

Andrea Pratt’s Spiral Notebook is open to the public at the Gumboot Café in Roberts Creek until June 30. Select works are displayed on her website at www.andreapratt.com and on Instagram at @andreaprattart.

Works by Langdale painter Andrea Pratt that encompass iconographic representations of spirituality and ecology are featured at the Gumboot Café in Roberts Creek this month.

Pratt gave the title Spiral Notebook to his solo exhibition of acrylic and oil paintings on square wood panels.

The show’s name is more than a nod to Pratt’s creative process. Large spirals spin and pulsate in each of his paintings.

The meaning of the form is specific to each of its contexts. In Insight, surrounded by leaves and forest fauna, concentric rings nurture germs of life. In Hamlet, interlocking ovoids reflect a wide-sky setting inhabited by a dragonfly and a long-legged magpie.

“A lot of the symbols are purely what appeals to me visually,” Pratt said. “But when I combine them, that’s where I create the intentionality of the piece. And I reuse my favorite symbols – for example, trees are one area I’ve had a lot of fun with over the past six months, just developing new ideas for tree shapes and how to make them work in a composition. You could say that the evolution of each symbol has its own timeline.

Pratt’s panel paintings are themselves composed of smaller panels, episodic patchworks of vignettes that can be viewed in any order.

“The concept of interdependence is central to human philosophies as diverse as Zen Buddhism and environmentalism,” she said, “and that is what I believe to be our most important guiding principle.”

Pratt’s personal trajectory traced an arc around Howe Sound. His Langdale studio faces the water towards the childhood homes of Horseshoe Bay and Lions Bay. A visual arts graduate from the University of Victoria, she became a full-time teacher while raising two children. Daily demands resulted in an 18-year hiatus from painting.

“But the desire never really went away,” she said. “Something was missing and it took me a while to realize that painting was that.”

Pratt quit her teaching career and began painting full time two decades ago. She has exhibited her work at venues including the Gibsons Public Art Gallery and Sechelt Hospital, as well as responding to a burgeoning commercial demand for what she describes as her “fusion of abstract, landscape and fine art. popular”.

Some of Pratt’s images were inspired by real encounters before being sublimated into formline abstraction. A crow regularly perched on her kitchen window sill, watching her work. “He was kind of a companion,” she said. “It was like I was his YouTube. I used photos of him as inspiration for a lot of my forms based on the type of postures he used.

Such serendipity is an essential ingredient of Pratt’s work. By combining and recombining archetypal forms, his paintings reward study with a meaning that depends on chance.

“I like the idea of ​​having a point of connection with people, but not immediately,” Pratt said. “There is something that attracts you, but you don’t understand it right away. It takes a little time.

Andrea Pratt’s Spiral Notebook is open to the public at the Gumboot Café in Roberts Creek until June 30. Select works are displayed on her website at www.andreapratt.com and on Instagram at @andreaprattart.

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Ventura Land Trust Hosts Outdoor Painting Workshop | Culture & Leisure https://russellchatham.com/ventura-land-trust-hosts-outdoor-painting-workshop-culture-leisure/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 00:39:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/ventura-land-trust-hosts-outdoor-painting-workshop-culture-leisure/ Posted on June 23, 2022 | 5:39 p.m. Harmon Canyon Preserve will provide inspiration for new and experienced artists “Three Hills”, an outdoor painting by Debra Holladay (Debra Holladay) Ventura Land Trust will present an outdoor painting workshop, at 8 a.m. on Saturday, July 9 at Harmon Canyon Preserve. California-based artists Debra Holladay, Laura Wambsgans, […]]]>

Posted on June 23, 2022
| 5:39 p.m.

Harmon Canyon Preserve will provide inspiration for new and experienced artists

Click to view larger

“Three Hills”, an outdoor painting by Debra Holladay (Debra Holladay)

Ventura Land Trust will present an outdoor painting workshop, at 8 a.m. on Saturday, July 9 at Harmon Canyon Preserve. California-based artists Debra Holladay, Laura Wambsgans, and Marian Fortunati will offer instruction to new and experienced artists on how to capture Harmon Canyon’s natural landscape through composition, form, color, and paint manipulation.

Participants will receive group and one-on-one instruction; and group discussion will allow painters to learn from each other. Ventura Land Trust staff will join the workshop to share elements of the natural and cultural history of Harmon Canyon Preserve.

Painting in the open air, the French expression for “en plein air”, is the act of leaving the walls of a studio and painting in the open air. Artists explore how to paint form and light, with its changing and ephemeral qualities, with portable paints and an easel.

“Painting en plein air allows me to focus and interact in real time to understand and learn about a place,” said Holladay, the workshop facilitator. “Experiencing light, color, sound, smell, temperature and touch magnifies and records my experience through painting.

“One of the most rewarding aspects of working outdoors is seeing things you’ve never noticed before, like the color of dry grass or a fleeting edge of neon where light bends or reflects .

“I hope to share this aspect of the vision and how to translate it into paint with workshop participants, in addition to a basic approach to turning a blank canvas into a paint.”

The workshop is $20 for Ventura Land Trust members; $30 for non-members. To register and view a list of suggested painting supplies, visit https://www.venturalandtrust.org/pleinair.

Holladay works both in the studio and in the field. His paintings capture fleeting moments of the American experience. His passion for art and his sense of travel for the natural world led to a series of outdoor painting adventures at Lake Ediza in the Eastern Sierras, California’s gold rush country, the Valley from Yosemite, Joshua Tree National Park and the California Coast.

Holladay received her Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Central Oklahoma, followed by six years of study at the Art Students League of New York. She is an artist member of the California Art Club, co-founder of Studio2310 and a founding member of the PAC6 Painters.

His work is frequently included in thematic museum and gallery exhibitions and invitational exhibitions. Visit https://www.debraholladay.net/.

Wambsgans began landscape oil painting 16 years ago after working as the general manager of a major recording studio and then as a sculptor for two decades. Studying with Scott Christensen and other landscape painters and painting daily, Wambsgans strives to capture the effect of light in the field, through color and paint quality.

Wambsgans’ work has been exhibited nationally in solo and group exhibitions, including at the Riverside Museum, Bakersfield Museum, Lancaster Museum, Ventura Museum, and Huntington Library.

In 2006, she directed Chasing Open Spaces, an environmental project painting the open spaces of the Santa Clarita Valley. The exposures generated by this project have contributed to the preservation of the Elsmere Canyon in Santa Clarita. Laura is a member of the California Art Club and a founding member of PAC6 Painters.

An award-winning artist, Fortunati considers herself “a lucky artist” because art has allowed her to discover more of the beauty of our world (and because her name, Fortunati, means “lucky” in Italian).

She is a contemporary California Impressionist who uses oil paints to create experiments with texture and color. His outdoor sketches often serve as references for larger studio work, but are also memories of places and adventures. She had a long career as a teacher and principal in Los Angeles.

Fortunati established a foundation in the Impressionist tradition of seeing and painting forms of light and color through the instruction of artists Ray Roberts, Frank Gardner, Matt Smith, Daniel Pinkham and master landscape and underwater artist David C. Gallup .

Fortunati’s work can be found in collections across the United States, Europe, China and Australia. She is an artist member of the California Art Club and a founding member of PAC6 Painters; she maintains affiliations with the American Impressionist Society and Oil Painters of America. To learn more, visit https://www.marianfortunati.com/.

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We Chat With Notts Artist Angelo Murphy About His Fascinating Oil Paintings and Winning a Jackson Amateur Prize https://russellchatham.com/we-chat-with-notts-artist-angelo-murphy-about-his-fascinating-oil-paintings-and-winning-a-jackson-amateur-prize/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 08:08:07 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/we-chat-with-notts-artist-angelo-murphy-about-his-fascinating-oil-paintings-and-winning-a-jackson-amateur-prize/ How did you come to art? Like most artists, I can’t remember not having been passionate about drawing. Even now there is something magical about the aroma of a new sketchbook and the smell of paints and pencils. The anticipation and potential to create something is very palpable. Luckily, I don’t think it’s going away. […]]]>

How did you come to art?
Like most artists, I can’t remember not having been passionate about drawing. Even now there is something magical about the aroma of a new sketchbook and the smell of paints and pencils. The anticipation and potential to create something is very palpable. Luckily, I don’t think it’s going away.

Despite going through the education system, I consider myself completely self-taught. Everything I know about painting, I discovered on my own. I think that’s true for a lot of artists, because each artist wants to achieve different results so that this journey is unique to them.

I work full time at Nottingham Lakeside and paint whenever I can in my spare time. It can be a real challenge after work to muster the energy to get into the studio, but it’s always worth it. The key is to have balance and routine. I paint in oil on canvas and settled in a studio at home; having experienced studios in large shared buildings with other artists, I think this best suits my time constraints and practice.

You really have the power to make everyday and mundane objects so soft and beautiful. What inspires your work?
I think the first spark of inspiration comes from observation. I don’t wait for inspiration to strike; I am constantly looking for it. If I see a particular shadow or quality of light hitting an object, I will make a note of it or try to remember what caught my attention. There are certain qualities of light and shadow that excite me, that drive me to try to capture and recreate in still life. I try to create small dramas on canvas. With each new composition, the challenge is to achieve this successfully. Still life is a genre that does not have the seriousness it deserves and that is exactly what inspires me and why I adopt it.

What artists are you inspired by?
The 17th century Dutch still life painters absolutely amaze me! Willem Claesz Heda, Clara Peeters, Pieter Claesz to name a few. But also Vermeer – his painting, Woman with a jug of water, is something I never tire of watching. Artists of this period pioneered observation, research into light and shadow, and the rendering of color modulation; It’s breathtaking. They also knew all the secrets – shadow boxes, light boxes, camera obscura and all sorts of wonderful gadgets that helped them when performing great compositions. What I’m trying to do is explore a contemporary response to what I love to watch. An interpretation and appreciation of baroque and chiaroscuro are never far from my compositions, but at the same time we want the work to be relevant, hence the golden syrup.

Nottingham has always had a vibrant arts scene for as long as I can remember

Your work, Citrus with Blue Paper, has just won the Amateur Jackson’s Painting Prize. What did you feel ?
I feel ambivalent towards any type of competition because everything is very subjective, but it creates opportunities. The simple fact of participating allows you to see your work. If you are a visual artist, so that’s what it’s all about, showing the work. The Jackson’s Painting Prize is a very well- respected competition, open to any artist in the world. This year, they received nearly 9,000 entrees, so I was glad I made the shortlist. Winning one of the prizes was a positive experience and raised my profile as an artist. It’s nice to receive validation for something you enjoy doing and encourage other artists to participate.

What do you think stands out about Nottingham’s art scene?
Nottingham has had a vibrant arts scene for as long as I can remember. Fortunately, there is a long tradition of affordable studio spaces to choose from, which has allowed artist groups to thrive. Unfortunately, those spaces are getting harder and harder to find, but they’re there and they underpin a very eclectic mix of talent. What is important for Nottingham is that people have access to great exhibitions and are not discouraged by price barriers. Nottingham Lakeside Arts has an excellent program of free events, as does Nottingham Contemporary.

Do you have any favorite artists from Nottingham?
It’s easy for me. I love Mat Collishaw’s work. Although Collishaw’s practice is now in London, he is originally from Nottingham and actually studied here for a time. I was particularly inspired by his work Last meal on death row, Texas, a series of beautiful C-type photographs where he had recreated the last meals of convicts in the style of Baroque vanitas. They are so dark and poignant and incredibly moving. I still watch them online from time to time just to remind myself.

@angelomurphyartist
angelomurphy.com

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New Art Exhibit, Prix Fixe Dinner June 29 https://russellchatham.com/new-art-exhibit-prix-fixe-dinner-june-29/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/new-art-exhibit-prix-fixe-dinner-june-29/ Join us for dinner on Thursday evening June 29 for the opening night of our new exhibition featuring the art of Sandra Leinonen Dunn, Gwendolyn Evans and Sandra Harper. To celebrate the artists, the Grill offers a fixed price three-course menu, with a choice of wine pairings, or choose a selection from the regular menu. […]]]>

Join us for dinner on Thursday evening June 29 for the opening night of our new exhibition featuring the art of Sandra Leinonen Dunn, Gwendolyn Evans and Sandra Harper. To celebrate the artists, the Grill offers a fixed price three-course menu, with a choice of wine pairings, or choose a selection from the regular menu. A portion of the proceeds from the dinner will be used to fund a scholarship for a Lincoln Academy student pursuing art studies. Please call ahead to make a reservation. The art can be seen until August 8.

Born and raised in Maine, Sandra Leinonen Dunn is a prominent Maine artist. Her works are in collections across the United States and abroad and she is represented by several galleries in Maine and Massachusetts. Using her intuitive sense of color and lyrical brushwork, Ms. Dunn creates paintings that express both her passion for beauty as well as her interest in and respect for classical painting techniques.

She shares, “I am a traditional painter working mostly in oils. Painting is for me like a mediation. When I’m working on a subject, I’m in my right brain where logic and words don’t exist, and the world just becomes nameless shapes and endless shades of color. The more I look at my subject, the more I see! That’s what fascinates me. I find inspiration for paintings all around me, and often it’s the shape, or color of a subject, that interests me as much (if not more) than the object itself. I want my paintings to contain a bit of something beautiful frozen in time. The only certain thing in this life is change. Through painting, I can capture (and retain) a moment, a bit of light, a splash of vibrant color, which I can then share with others. She has a studio at her home in Chelsea.

Gwendolyn Evans’ art – as diverse as the 35 places she calls home – includes watercolor landscapes, pastel portraits, nude figures, oils and mixed media abstracts. Gwendolyn has exhibited her work in over 80 regional, national and international juried exhibitions, and her paintings are in hundreds of private and corporate collections. She shares, “For me, making art is like breathing. I can’t live without it! Making art is a way to understand and communicate what I see and feel. Prolific and intense in my work, I am interested in many styles from realism to abstraction, and work in many different mediums. I’m always interested in capturing light and dark, whether physical or spiritual. I enjoy working outdoors capturing the feeling, tone, colors and meaning of each unique location. As I breathe every day, I paint every day. The spirit permeates everything. Whether it’s painting, writing, teaching, cooking an exquisite meal, it’s all one, creativity stems from ideas we hold dear; for me these ideas center on truth, love, beauty, nature and gratitude for good. Dark days are the chiaroscuro in an artist’s life to make the light all the brighter. One of my greatest joys is showing off my work and sharing the stories behind it. Gwendolyn lives and creates on the Pemaquid Peninsula.

A lifelong artist, Sandra Harper has been inspired for over 30 years to paint the beauty of Maine through seascapes, coastal villages, lighthouses and inland landscapes. Sandy paints in a traditional realism style using a light touch and careful attention to detail. She prefers oil as a medium because it allows for the subtle blends and depth of color that characterize her work. She uses elements of light and color to present the beauty, magic and power of nature. Seascapes continue to be a favorite genre with their challenge of capturing the ever-changing light and dynamic movement of sky and water.

Sandy shares “My goal is to capture the magical moments in time, to reflect the mood and movement of the sea and the brilliance of light hitting the land. I paint not just to commemorate these scenes but to share them. Her work is in private collections across the country and has been shown in New York, Massachusetts and Maine.Since 1988 Sandy has lived and worked in the rural town of Litchfield where she has her studio.

The Grill is open Monday to Saturday at 3 p.m., Happy Hour is from 3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Close on Sunday. Lunch hours will resume soon. To make a reservation, please call 207-563-2992. For more information: www.damariscottarivergrill.com
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Tiwani Contemporary in the company she runs | The Guardian Nigeria News https://russellchatham.com/tiwani-contemporary-in-the-company-she-runs-the-guardian-nigeria-news/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 04:12:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/tiwani-contemporary-in-the-company-she-runs-the-guardian-nigeria-news/ Tucked away on serene Elsie Femi Pearse Street, Victoria Island, Lagos, Tiwani Contemporary are what journalist Yinka Olatunbosun has described as ‘uncovered’ statement pieces. The residential building with which the gallery shares a significant complex stands out in its surroundings with its fresh white paint, elegant palm trees and sleek glass windows. The gallery is […]]]>

Tucked away on serene Elsie Femi Pearse Street, Victoria Island, Lagos, Tiwani Contemporary are what journalist Yinka Olatunbosun has described as ‘uncovered’ statement pieces.

The residential building with which the gallery shares a significant complex stands out in its surroundings with its fresh white paint, elegant palm trees and sleek glass windows.

The gallery is a dream come true for Greek gallerist Maria Varnava, who lived in Nigeria as a child but now resides in England, where she founded the Tiwani Gallery in 2012.

Since Tiwani Contemporary arrived in Nigeria in February 2022, the purpose-built 2,000 square foot gallery has become a “diasporic consultation”. And as a home for diaspora arts, detective work has focused on the best of contemporary Africa.

Outside the gallery was featuring British-Nigerian painter Joy Labinjo, whose exhibition, Full Ground, which was curated by Nigerian-American artist and curator, Temitayo Ogunbiyi, who coincidentally is exhibiting in the second gallery exhibition, drew rave reviews. and critical interrogation for its content perceived as “nudist”

The title of the second show is taken from Mary McCarthy’s first novel, The Company She Keeps, a series of six cleverly interconnected New York short stories, which made almost as much noise when it was published in 1942.

Curated by Adelaide Bannerman, the exhibition, which runs from May 28 to August 13, 2022, arrives slung over her shoulder, a wonderfully concise confirmation of the intellectual woman.

The five exhibiting artists, Chioma Ebinama, Miranda Forrester, Ogunbiyi, Nengi Omuku and Charmaine Watkiss, all women, work internationally.

In the show, they detail the radical circles that woman inhabits and interrogate a semi-autobiographical and revealing insight into a shiny but fractured matriarchal order.

Materially and collectively, their works draw attention to intimacy, restorative approaches and the valorization of work.

Ebinama, who is based in Athens, Greece, is interested in animist mythologies and non-Western philosophies, and conceptualizes her interpretations as drawn compositions and watercolors on rag paper. His watercolor is lyrical and transformative.

The exhibition features her suspended circular painting, The Bride 2 (2022), inspired by a wedding rite scene, as featured in Chinua Achebe’s classic 1958 novel, Things Fall Apart. This is presented with the audio piece, Prayer for when fear strikes at dawn (2022).

The metaphorical fluidity of his work allows visitors to understand his natural environment in a new way and makes the painting a reflexive sequence of African cosmogony.

Varnava

For Britain’s London-based Forrester, she has two large-scale works: the diptych, Give Me All of You (2021) and two selected works from Introspection I-IV (2022) an installation that incorporates hand-painted murals and paintings using oil, gloss and image transfer on transparent polycarbonate panels. The installation centers an abstract game of domesticity and interiority, structured by the gazes and intimacies shared between women.

Forrester’s work lives in worlds of emotion that equal the earnestness encountered by parents, lovers and friends.

Ogunbiyi comes with how commerce, architecture, history and botanical cultures inform the interactions and gestures that inscribe public and private space.

She continues her robust and thorny work of establishing the nerves and resistances of real-life experience. Avoiding the contiguous trappings of sweetness, the work transcends the context of social privilege to enter into the big issues of real life, in which every girl must learn.

Working across the disciplines of painting, drawing and sculpture, she presents You will labor to find value anew and Sweet Mother, Mama Ibadan (2022), which pays tribute to the dexterity and work of women.

Omuku presents Candyscape (2022), which adapts her interests in political-cultural representations of the figurative body to understand the psychotherapeutic impact of landscape on the psyche.

She plunders a range of lore to do it herself in a way that tells such a story. She gives life to a pantheon and counts the rhymes and rhythms of her objects.

Continuing its signature use of Sanyan silk fabric, Candyscape is a large-scale oil painting that momentarily suggests a retreat for the body, to harness the restorative power of real and ideal landscapes.

While Watkiss, another British artist, (UK) is based in London. Her sequel to new designs, Àse (2022) brings the matrilineal deities of Watkiss to Nigeria. These “plant warriors” are the human and spiritual embodiment of the medicinal plants and seeds dispersed to the new worlds from West Africa via transatlantic trade between the 16th and 19th centuries. The journey of the deities is a rite of custody and reparation ceremonially remembering which flora has been taken.

Tiwani founder Varnava, a member of the team of art practitioners, curators, artists and gallery owners, who ushered in a new trend in Nigeria’s visual design, says the gallery is helping to revitalize the contemporary art scene in the world. most populous black nation.

She believes that the patronage of a pan-African collector base must be cultivated, including individuals and organisations.

“I really think we’re navigating through an interesting time back then,” Varnava says. “There is so much enthusiasm and support around art from Africa and the Diaspora. It is also a period of great speculation.

This caveat is understandable. Tiwani Gallery is a business enterprise with lofty goals of expansion far beyond its Nigerian business.

“We need more rigorous support, and that collectors support an older but also younger generation of artists,” she adds. “It is very necessary for the longevity of this moment.

The lady, who grew up in Lagos, says. “I moved to Lagos from Cyprus when I was 40 days old. I lived here until I was 11. I grew up around the works of Suzanne Wenger, Twin Seven Seven, Bruce Onabrakpeya, Ben Osagia, etc.”

Upon completing her MA in African Studies with a specialization in African Art at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in London, she established her gallery in Fitzrovia, central London. For her, the location of the gallery was important for the message she had to convey. Having previously worked with an international auction house, she discovered a weakness in the international visual arts scene.

“I thought there wasn’t enough engagement with contemporary material from Nigeria and Africa at the time. I started doing research and talking to people who were interested in publishing or exhibiting just to introduce some sort of extra ‘vibe’ to the art scene in London,” she says.

His meeting with the late Nigerian curator, founder and director of the Center for Contemporary Arts (CCA), Bisi Silva, in 2008 influenced the birth of Tiwani Contemporary.

“She was instrumental in the development of Tiwani as a whole. She was a great friend and mentor and helped me set up Tiwani in London. And throughout the process of the past 10 years, it was always an open conversation with Bisi when she was still with us and also with my colleagues,” she recalls.

“For me, I thought commercially it would have made sense to establish this in New York or Paris. But then I feel very close to my Nigerian upbringing. I feel very passionate about the artists I work with and themes I want to explore. I think if we want to be part of the Africa movement globally, we have to be here, talk to local artists and also engage with local patrons. Basically, I would like to see more works by Nigerian artists.”

Thus, Tiwani Contemporary has become an institution in Nigeria to help build relationships, convey messages and bridge the gap between local and international artists and collectors.

WHILE thinking back to her beginnings at the Tiwani Gallery in London, she remembers the obstacles overcome to position contemporary African art where it is.

“I was an outsider in every way. I was an outsider in the sense that my output was full of artists from Africa and the diaspora. Fantastic galleries were already working with some of them. October went to El Anatsui but I was not part of the gallery system. I was an outsider because of the geography I represented. The only way to overcome that was through the quality of the artists we choose to hire. We have to create the charts through the shows. We had to find the bias and it was a long journey, not easy. We also had shortcomings in the early days that we learned of.

“It was a constant learning process every day, but I think over the last four years or so things started to feel a lot, I don’t want to use the word easier but smoother. Suddenly, we’re looking for customers and now customers are chasing us – so there’s a change and we have a bigger type of movement right now.

“If you want to build a truly international collection, we have to include Africa in the conversation. Tiwani started shaping things and this led to the creation of an art fair specifically for African galleries. He corrected the way art from Africa should be valued.

“People had this idea that just because I was working with African artists, the price of art should be cheaper or cheaper. But we helped break down those barriers to trade. Galleries and auction houses are not best friends but suddenly, there is a shift in the market and we see a synergy between the two,” she reveals.

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