Oil Paintings – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ Tue, 21 Sep 2021 22:33:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://russellchatham.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2.png Oil Paintings – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ 32 32 Georgia O’Keeffe’s unrecognized role as patron and collector http://russellchatham.com/georgia-okeeffes-unrecognized-role-as-patron-and-collector/ http://russellchatham.com/georgia-okeeffes-unrecognized-role-as-patron-and-collector/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 21:42:00 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/georgia-okeeffes-unrecognized-role-as-patron-and-collector/ Marsden Hartley was another artist O’Keeffe deeply admired, and she once wrote that her work was akin to “a marching band in a little closet.” Both were deeply influenced by their local landscape and sense of place, sharing an appreciation for regions outside of major cities and portraying the sublime in styles that resonated emotionally […]]]>

Marsden Hartley was another artist O’Keeffe deeply admired, and she once wrote that her work was akin to “a marching band in a little closet.” Both were deeply influenced by their local landscape and sense of place, sharing an appreciation for regions outside of major cities and portraying the sublime in styles that resonated emotionally and formally as opposed to realistic and demanding.

The story’s reliance on a clear, easily digestible narrative of Stieglitz as a focal point of the modernist art world is partly to blame for O’Keeffe’s lack of recognition. Stieglitz himself was a strong advocate for her, and their relationship was based on a sense of mutual respect. When he saw his works for the first time, he exclaimed: “Finally, a woman on paper! In his role as curator and dealer, Stieglitz lobbied for collectors and curators to give O’Keeffe and his work the same respect as other modern masters, all male, who demanded space on the walls. from 291. He has never hesitated to express his admiration for O’Keeffe, in letters filled with purple prose and sentiment that describe a man desperately in love. To illustrate this point, Reynolda’s wall text begins with an epigraph by Stieglitz: “She is the Spirit of 291, not I.” Stieglitz would echo this sentiment at An American Place, writing in a 1934 letter: “La place comes first – and Georgia has room.

The second room of “The O’Keeffe Circle” focuses on the artist’s personal collection, highlighting the art with which she herself has lived and informing her acquisition process; above all, it seems that she cherished simplicity. Reynolda specifically highlights a painting by Arthur Dove, Dancing (1934), and works by the Japanese artist, who influenced his style much more than the European modernists who won over his peers. The exhibition also presents a akari paper lantern, modeled on that offered to the artist by. This lamp was one of the only sources of light in O’Keeffe’s house, aside from its floor-to-ceiling windows – you can imagine the vibe once the gallery lights are dimmed. O’Keeffe also owned a large mobile, a crown jewel that often appears in the background of artists’ portraits.


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Florine Suire obituary (2021) – Erath, LA http://russellchatham.com/florine-suire-obituary-2021-erath-la/ http://russellchatham.com/florine-suire-obituary-2021-erath-la/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 05:34:36 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/florine-suire-obituary-2021-erath-la/ The funeral will be on Wednesday September 22, 2021, with a Christian burial mass at Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church, Erath, Louisiana, in honor of the life of Florine Montey Suire, 98, who passed away peacefully at her domicile Sunday, September 19, 2021. Readings will be given by Madeline LeBlanc and TJ LeBlanc. The […]]]>
The funeral will be on Wednesday September 22, 2021, with a Christian burial mass at Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church, Erath, Louisiana, in honor of the life of Florine Montey Suire, 98, who passed away peacefully at her domicile Sunday, September 19, 2021. Readings will be given by Madeline LeBlanc and TJ LeBlanc. The bearers of the gift will be his great-grandchildren TJ LeBlanc, Charles Ed Turner, Madeline LeBlanc, Chris “Blaine” Turner, Jake LeBlanc and Peter LeBlanc. The singer will be Jodi Boich and the violinist Lauren Baker. She will rest in the cemetery of Erath with as co-officiants Father André Metrejean and Monsignor Charles Dubois officiating mass and services. Holders include TJ LeBlanc, Charles Ed Turner, Chris “Blaine” Turner, Jake LeBlanc, Peter LeBlanc, Eric Perrin and Tim LeBlanc. Ms. Suire was born in LeRoy, Louisiana, and resided in Erath for most of her life. She graduated from Indian Bayou High School and Southwestern Louisiana Institute with a Bachelor of Science degree. She was a loving mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, and friend to all who had the pleasure of knowing her. Ms. Suire was a home economics teacher with instructions and lessons taught to hundreds of students during her twenty-nine years at Erath, Meaux, Henry and Abbeville high schools. Ms. Suire was a talented, proud and stately lady – appropriate in every way. She was a gracious hostess with a lot of flair. Some of the talents mastered during his life included sewing, quilting, painting, decoupage, knitting, crochet, cooking, baking, and canning. She has never stopped researching and learning new techniques to express her creative gene. She was an extremely talented artist who created an impressive collection of hand-quilted blankets, pillows, draperies and oil paintings. His paintings and quilts are proudly displayed in all of his family’s homes, as well as at Erath City Hall and Hamilton Hall at the University of Louisiana. She and her husband, Johnnie, loved to travel to the United States, Europe and Mexico. The most memorable was a summer spent in France representing the Acadian region for CODOFIL. The most memorable time with her grandchildren and great-grandchildren would be the hours spent reading little guest books, making wooden puzzles, and playing the battle card game to help teach Numbers. The most notable baked goods were his beloved fig cakes made from his canned figs with fruit from his fig tree and peanut butter fudge. A tradition passed down to his granddaughter Jeanne Perrin. During her lifetime, she was an active member of the Workers, the Demi Tasse Coffee Club, the Twelve and Go Club, the Catholic Daughters and Bible classes. She belonged to the Louisiana Teachers Association, the Louisiana Vocational Association, the Vermilion Parish, the Louisiana and American Home Economics Association, and the Delta Kappa Gamma International Society. Her daughter Rickey Domingues and her husband Ed. Two granddaughters, Mary D. LeBlanc and her husband, Tim, Jeanne Perrin, and her husband Eric and six grandchildren. TJ LeBlanc and his wife Sarah, Madeline, Jake and Peter LeBlanc and Charles Ed and Chris “Blaine” Turner. She was predeceased by her beloved husband of sixty-three years, Johnnie W. Suire as well as her parents Roy and Emelina Montey. Her four sisters, Anise “Nanoon” M. Comeaux, Famie M. Comeaux, Inez M. Primeaux and Rosie M. Meaux. Her older sister Nanoon was particularly close and influential in her life choices. She emphasized the importance of higher education and made sure she was exposed to experiences such as horseback riding, violin and other music lessons. The family would like to express their deepest gratitude to their doctors -Lahasky, Fei and Leleux, as well as to their loving end-of-life assistants Valérie, Debbie, Mandy and Christine. Honorary bearers will be Dr Michael Foreman, David Sonnier, Harold Primeaux, Philippe Saunier, Chris Salvo and Lovelace Touchet. The family is asking those who wish to express their sympathy to consider making a donation to their favorite charity or to St Joseph’s Seminary College, 75376 River Road, St. Benedict, Louisiana 70457, in memory of Florine Montey Suire. David Funeral home of Erath will take care of the arrangements. 337-937-0405, 209 East Putnam Street, Erath, Louisiana. Visitations will take place on Tuesday September 21, 2021 from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. with a recitation of the Rosary at 7:00 p.m. by the Catholic Daughters. Tours will resume Wednesday from 10:00 a.m. until the service time at 1:00 p.m. You can sign the guest register and express your condolences online at www.davidfuneralhome.org. To help the community stay safe, we will honor the Louisiana Mandates of August 1, 2021. All families and their guests are required to wear face coverings at the funeral home and at church. Thank you for your understanding in this unprecedented period.

Published by The Acadiana Advocate September 20-22, 2021.


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The identification of the painting as a 17th century masterpiece is a joy to the parish http://russellchatham.com/the-identification-of-the-painting-as-a-17th-century-masterpiece-is-a-joy-to-the-parish/ http://russellchatham.com/the-identification-of-the-painting-as-a-17th-century-masterpiece-is-a-joy-to-the-parish/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 21:20:59 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/the-identification-of-the-painting-as-a-17th-century-masterpiece-is-a-joy-to-the-parish/ NEW ROCHELLE, NY (CNS) – A parish in a neighborhood that once had the highest concentration of COVID-19 cases in the country has found new joy when it finds that a familiar painting on its church’s transept door is a 17th century masterpiece. “Holy Family with the Infant St. John”, a Florentine Baroque by Cesare […]]]>

NEW ROCHELLE, NY (CNS) – A parish in a neighborhood that once had the highest concentration of COVID-19 cases in the country has found new joy when it finds that a familiar painting on its church’s transept door is a 17th century masterpiece.

“Holy Family with the Infant St. John”, a Florentine Baroque by Cesare Dandini, was installed in the 1960s at Holy Family Church in the New York suburb of New Rochelle. Parishioners described it as one of the many beautiful works of art in the parish.

In early 2020, a fine arts and art history professor from neighboring Iona College made several private visits to the church, sitting on a back bench.

On his fourth voyage, when the church lights were shining, Thomas Ruggio saw the Dandini high on a wall above a transept exit. He recognized the painting as an Italian Baroque and took pictures with his cell phone.

Back at his office, he shared the photos with colleagues in Italy. The painting has been positively identified as one of four similarly themed works by Dandini, probably created in the 1630s.

Ruggio’s further research at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York indicated that the painting was missing as there was no public record of it from the early to mid-20th century.

Mgr. Dennis Keane, pastor of the Holy Family, told Catholic News Service that the painting was acquired in Rome by one of his predecessors, Mgr. Charles Fitzgerald, in the mid-1960s. Mgr. Keane said that Mgr. Fitzgerald had previously been posted to Rome.

He said he thought a benefactor had given to Mgr. Fitzgerald funds for the purchase. Mgr. Fitzgerald’s niece had the painting restored and framed before it was installed in the parish church.

Ruggio said the four linked paintings have the theme of charity. Two are religious and two are not. All have a central maternal figure. Ruggio said that “The Holy Family with the Infant Saint John” is one of Dandini’s finest works and the culmination of his creative journey through this theme.

The 46 inch by 57 inch oil painting on canvas features Mary, Joseph, and the children Jesus and John the Baptist. Ruggio said the composition of the parish canvas is more dynamic than the other three.

“Joseph is almost a stage thief here and reaches his full potential due to his interaction with Saint-Jean-Baptiste,” he said.

Among the associated paintings, one is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, another is in the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia, and the fourth is in a private collection in the New York district of Manhattan.

“The Holy Family with the Infant Saint-Jean” is estimated at $ 800,000. Mgr. Keane said he was told during his tenure that the painting was probably the most valuable in the parish’s collection, “possibly around $ 50,000.” He said local tradition attributed the painting to the Dandini school, but not to the painter himself.

“I was surprised by the news and grateful to Tom (Ruggio) for having been able to research the history of art,” said Mgr. Keane said.

Teresa Cohan Minnaugh grew up in Holy Family Parish. She said her family entered and left church under Dandini’s painting every Sunday.

“Sometimes your mind wanders during Mass. I remember looking at this painting and thinking, “Wow, these babies are fat. Real babies are not that big! ‘”

Susan Woodruff is the youngest of six children who attended Holy Family. She said her brother developed an interest in art at the parish and became a painter. Her early guardianship helped her appreciate the three-dimensional aspect of the canvas.

“I always looked at the inside of the baby’s foot. It was so different, “she said. By Dandini’s deliberate design, the bottom of Mary’s foot is also visible to a viewer looking at the painting.

On September 17, “The Holy Family with the Infant Saint John” was exhibited at the Ryan Library at Iona College, an institution founded by the Congregation of the Christian Brothers. It is loaned for three months by the parish of Sainte-Famille.

Richard Palladino, director of Iona Libraries, said its high location on a wall in the well-lit entrance to the atrium allows it to be shared with students and the public.

“It’s also a wonderful opportunity for the students to see something historic firsthand,” he said.

Mgr. Keane said he was happy to allow other people to see and appreciate the work. He said the parish is preparing for the relocation of Dandini’s painting, possibly to coincide with the feast of the Holy Family in January.

For the moment, the space where it was hung is covered with a white curtain and Mgr. Keane explores appropriate security in preparation for his return.

“People are looking at a white wall now, but when the painting returns, the image will enter their hearts – seeing Jesus, Mary and Joseph and the forerunner, John the Baptist,” he said. “In the past, painting was part of the background. Now he will be in the foreground.

In March 2020, much of Holy Family Parish was included in New York State’s first mandated “containment zone” established to combat the spread of COVID-19.

Mgr. Keane said that authenticating the Dandini “adds joy to life. We have had so much bad news, with the pandemic, the riots and the violence. It’s good news. What was lost is now discovered.


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These photorealistic oil paintings will blow your mind! http://russellchatham.com/these-photorealistic-oil-paintings-will-blow-your-mind/ http://russellchatham.com/these-photorealistic-oil-paintings-will-blow-your-mind/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 10:00:06 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/these-photorealistic-oil-paintings-will-blow-your-mind/ It’s absolutely amazing what artists can do with paint and a brush, and Yasutomo Oka is an outstanding example. When you look at his paintings, you might almost think this 34-year-old resident of Aichi Prefecture is an extraordinary photographer. Take a closer look, however, you can see that these are not photographs at all. These […]]]>

It’s absolutely amazing what artists can do with paint and a brush, and Yasutomo Oka is an outstanding example.

When you look at his paintings, you might almost think this 34-year-old resident of Aichi Prefecture is an extraordinary photographer. Take a closer look, however, you can see that these are not photographs at all.

These breathtaking images are all painted. Surrealist painter Yasutomo Oka captured the world’s attention with his talent.

Are Yasutomo Oka’s paintings CG?

Image: @ oka.yasutoma on Instagram

Having overcome the fact that these portraits are not photographs, it is tempting to start speculating that they are computer generated. After all, the technology in this way has progressed so rapidly in recent times and has become very convincing.

They are not computer generated either! All of these portraits are in fact oil paintings. Highly detailed and highly skilled applications of oil painting.

How does Yasutomo Oka make these paintings?

Yasutoma Oka
Image: @ oka.yasutoma on Instagram

Oka says there are real models for the women he paints. Their appearance, however, is just a starting point from which he can create. He makes the changes he wants, and finally, after many hours, comes up with the image he wants to create.

Such complexities take a long time. Some of them take up to a month (sometimes longer) to complete, depending on the customer and the size of the part.

Part of the magic comes from mixing smooth body parts like skin with straight hair and eyelashes. This contrast results in the hyper-real visuals that made Yasutomo Oka so famous and revered.

In addition to detail and contrast, Oka’s use of color is also what makes his paintings stand out so much. Even the eyes, if you look closely, reflect the light from inside the painting.

The background of Oka

Yasutoma Oka
Image: @ oka.yasutoma on Instagram

Yasutoma Oka was born in Aichi Prefecture, Japan. He graduated from Tama Art University in 2006. He is internationally known in the art world because his paintings are so real that they cannot be distinguished from photographs.

It usually takes him about a month to complete one of his detailed works. He begins with real models and often “idealizes” them when painting. Some women are depicted wearing traditional kimonos, and others are depicted with beautiful hair ornaments in a forest or against floral wallpaper.

Oka is so good at painting every facial feature to perfection. Every strand of hair, patch of skin and piece of fabric is captured with crisp detail. Oka says he feels the most pressure when drawing the eyes due to their importance to the face. When painting photo-realistic, the eyes tend to make or break the image.

Each of his portraits features realistic reflections and light reflections which make them very convincing and lifelike.

Yasutoma Oka
Image: @ oka.yasutoma on Instagram

Where to see Yasutomo Oka’s work

You can get an update of the Oka Gallery’s recent exhibitions on their website, which can be found here.

You can see images of Oka’s incredible work on her Instagram



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One of the most demanding and inventive figures in contemporary African art http://russellchatham.com/one-of-the-most-demanding-and-inventive-figures-in-contemporary-african-art/ http://russellchatham.com/one-of-the-most-demanding-and-inventive-figures-in-contemporary-african-art/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 18:20:07 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/one-of-the-most-demanding-and-inventive-figures-in-contemporary-african-art/ Zimbabwe-born artist Kudzanai Chiurai is a phenomenon. From large-scale photos of fictional African dictators to experimental films and protest posters, rich oil paintings and minimal sculptures, his work is held in the best galleries and collections around the world. Chiurai, however, frequently ignores gallery spaces to exhibit in warehouses, on the street, or in urban […]]]>

Zimbabwe-born artist Kudzanai Chiurai is a phenomenon. From large-scale photos of fictional African dictators to experimental films and protest posters, rich oil paintings and minimal sculptures, his work is held in the best galleries and collections around the world. Chiurai, however, frequently ignores gallery spaces to exhibit in warehouses, on the street, or in urban venues. His latest project, The Library of Things We Forgot to Remember, is housed in a shopping complex, 44 Stanley, in Johannesburg. It is built around his practice as a collector focused on the preservation of archives and the commemoration of the social and cultural history of southern Africa. He turned his library and personal archives into a public art project. The library reflects Chiurai’s artistic repertoire, which uses mixed media to address social, political and cultural issues. This is reminiscent of his groundbreaking 2011 exhibition State of the Nation which explored conflict by building an African utopia that allowed him to merge forms and mediums, juxtapose political ideas, evoke historical figures – like a discourse of the Killed Congolese independence leader Patrice Lumumba delivered by artist Zaki Ibrahim – alongside a performance by contemporary musician Thandiswa Mazwai.

SOURCE: THE CONVERSATION


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Huron Plainsman | Spirit of Dakota 2021 plans art exhibit http://russellchatham.com/huron-plainsman-spirit-of-dakota-2021-plans-art-exhibit/ http://russellchatham.com/huron-plainsman-spirit-of-dakota-2021-plans-art-exhibit/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 17:29:31 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/huron-plainsman-spirit-of-dakota-2021-plans-art-exhibit/ Three South Dakota artists will showcase their work at an art exhibit that kicks off at 4 p.m. on Saturday, October 2, before the Spirit of Dakota banquet at the Huron Event Center. Works by Julie Waldner, Marian Sprecher and Douglas Bunn will be on display and artists will be on hand to visit the […]]]>

Three South Dakota artists will showcase their work at an art exhibit that kicks off at 4 p.m. on Saturday, October 2, before the Spirit of Dakota banquet at the Huron Event Center.

Works by Julie Waldner, Marian Sprecher and Douglas Bunn will be on display and artists will be on hand to visit the public.

Bunn is 97 years old and has lived in Miller’s retirement home for eight years. Her daughter, Jackie Holtz, will be bringing her artwork to the show and will be on hand to visit people.

“God bless him, he still makes charcoal,” Holtz said of his father. “He can’t make any oils anymore, but he’s still doodling and busy. It was his life.

His favorite work of his father is an oil painting he created of Sitting Bull. Bunn was commissioned in the late 1980s to make cartoons and charcoals for the original Brown Derby restaurant in Hollywood and Pasadena. Many of his works are still hung in the restaurant to this day.

Bunn began taking commissions for oil portraits and landscapes after retiring from his commercial art career in graphic design, including 50 years of teaching art.

His strongest philosophy in portrait painting is: “Make sure it’s a painting, not a photograph, leave something to the imagination,” he reportedly said.

Julie Waldner, who lives in Iroquois with her husband Rudy, painted since her childhood and grew up on the colony with her family. She recently opened her own studio, Dakota Reflections Art Studio, in the basement of their home.

Waldner is a self-taught artist, although she enjoys listening to other artists and learning new techniques.

“When I started out as a kid, I had a few paint numbers, but it wasn’t enough,” Waldner said. “I used home paints and dyes and mixed my own paints.”

Waldner usually takes a photo of the scene she wants to paint and works from it.

“I love to paint what’s there, like an abandoned truck or a barn,” she says. “I try to find the history of the place or the house, and I meet people.

“I painted an old abandoned Victorian style house in the middle of nowhere that I found on Mitchell’s path,” she said. “I tracked down the people who lived there – two women. It was the greatest pleasure to have them come and watch the painting. The memories they shared from their home. Their grandfather built it and 11 children lived there. It was abandoned in the 1950s.

“My heart and my passion is to paint rural South Dakota, the forgotten South Dakota,” added Waldner. “Just drive and find them. It’s amazing how they stand out on the prairie. It makes a beautiful setting.

Marian Sprecher, originally from Wolsey, is an accomplished watercolor artist who captures the character of her subject using soft colors and light.

Sprecher attributes his artistic side to his maternal grandfather who was an artist and inventor. As a self-taught artist, Sprecher has participated in numerous watercolor workshops with nationally renowned artists. She also took art classes at Augustana College in Sioux Falls.

In 2007, Sprecher’s life changed when she had an aneurysm that caused a stroke on her left side.
She gives the Lord all the credit for having spared her life and for allowing her to continue in her artistic endeavors. She will also be featured in a solo art exhibition at the Wein Gallery in 2022.

While still in physiotherapy after her stroke, Sprecher created a bucket list goal to paint each grandchild. At that time, there were only five, and to this day she and her 50-year-old husband Steve have nine grandchildren. She achieved her goal of painting all of them during the pandemic in 2020.

Sprecher’s paintings come from his everyday world, such as meadows, landscapes, houses, farms, barns, farm animals and flowers.

With each painting, Sprecher said his desire was to use watercolor to express “the gifts of God in nature with design and color images”.

COURTESY PHOTOS A selection of artwork by featured artists that are part of the Spirit of Dakota art exhibit


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Wanda Alice McKee Henderson | The sun on the north side http://russellchatham.com/wanda-alice-mckee-henderson-the-sun-on-the-north-side/ http://russellchatham.com/wanda-alice-mckee-henderson-the-sun-on-the-north-side/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 20:10:12 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/wanda-alice-mckee-henderson-the-sun-on-the-north-side/ Wanda Alice McKee Henderson passed away peacefully at her Jackson, Mississippi home on September 15, 2021. She was 88 years old. Classy, ​​elegant, kind and loving are some adjectives one could use to describe Alice. To know her was to love her. His constant positivity and infectious laughter imbued with warmth anyone who crossed his […]]]>

Wanda Alice McKee Henderson passed away peacefully at her Jackson, Mississippi home on September 15, 2021. She was 88 years old.

Classy, ​​elegant, kind and loving are some adjectives one could use to describe Alice. To know her was to love her. His constant positivity and infectious laughter imbued with warmth anyone who crossed his path. From her childhood home on Council Circle in Jackson, her years living in New Orleans, her warm and welcoming farmhouse on Southwood Road, to her place at The Orchard in her later years, everyone who knew Alice in During these different phases of her life were friends that she made to feel like family.

Alice was born to Wanda O’Daniel McKee and Clyde Vernon McKee Sr. in Pontotoc, Mississippi on December 17, 1932, the youngest of three children. Alice’s mother died of an illness when Alice was three years old. Her father then married Ruth Porter, who helped raise Alice. Her two beloved older brothers, Clyde Vernon McKee Jr. and John Max McKee, also helped care for Alice. A family story goes that Clyde, Alice’s 18 oldest, has to babysit her by bringing her to some of her college events and parties. Later, Clyde’s wife, Mary Louise Bevil McKee, was also often Alice’s mother figure.

Alice graduated from the University of Mississippi, or Ole Miss, where she was a member of the Chi Omega sorority. Alice and her husband, John, were proud and long-time donors to her alma mater, Trinity University in Texas, and hers, Ole Miss. They created the John P. and Wanda Alice Henderson Council Scholarship to Ole Miss which helps ensure students not only are supported in their academic studies, but also benefit from expanded experiences such as trips to cultural venues and dinners. monthly with life lessons. They were also long-time benefactors of the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary and the First Baptist Church of Jackson. After college, Alice went to work in New Orleans, as executive secretary of the Shell Oil Company for many years. Her nieces and nephews remember walking past the gigantic Shell skyscraper in New Orleans and hearing Alice tell about her adventures while she lived and worked there years before, like taking the streetcar to go work, all with his characteristic smile and laugh.

It was in New Orleans that Alice met the love of her life, former Navy Captain John Pinkney Henderson. John, a longtime ExxonMobil Corp. employee, invited Alice and her friend to a working lunch one day, and afterwards Alice wrote John a thank you note. John was extremely impressed with her thank you note and darling dresses and fell in love. Alice and John married in 1967. They spent many years living in the Garden District and enjoying New Orleans’ social scene. Their nieces and nephews fondly remember trips to visit them in New Orleans, where Alice and John took them to the best restaurants and social clubs, such as “Friday Lunch” at Galatoire, where Emery, friend and longtime waiter. date, was taking care of him. of them. Everyone had a good time.

Alice and John returned to Jackson to care for Alice’s father, Clyde, who later retired from his post as Superintendent of Mississippi Schools, and they became active in their church, the First Baptist Church of Jackson. , for many decades. Their long-standing friendships created through this fellowship have provided another valuable source of love for the Hendersons over the years. Alice’s faith was strong and unwavering, and comforted her through her grief when she lost John on February 7, 2011, at the age of 95.

The Hendersons were among the most active members of Jackson’s social scene. Alice had a social calendar that would rival that of any teenager. Any Friday and Saturday night, you might find Alice and John assisting or hosting one of their many “Supper Clubs”. Alice was an accomplished host and encouraged her nieces and grandnieces at a young age to start thinking about a collectible porcelain and silver design. Alice was thrilled to have her in her beautiful Southwood Road home, which she helped design, and held many joyful gatherings there. Her beloved nieces and nephews will fondly remember their visit and waking up to have a café au lait (coffee with chicory) and rejoice each morning with Alice and John in the “sun room”, reading newspaper or discussing the latest Rebel or Saints football. Thu Sunday morning after church, the couple met at “The Club,” the Jackson Country Club, where they had been loved for decades.

Alice possessed a seemingly effortless skill to elevate any situation to make it more fun and glamorous. Great-nephews John Kent and Cameron recall having fun blowing out candles with a variety of stylish snuffers that she would take out and ask them to start sifting the flames. Her family and friends will no doubt remember her famous Café Royale set that she took out at the end of her multi-course dinners – events that characterize her joie de vivre – which involved lighting burning, soaked sugar lumps. of cognac, to everyone’s delight. She once sent her husband, John, who was then elderly, her older brother, Clyde, her nephew Tad, and her grandnephew, Robert, a little boy at the time, to acquire a new torch. to make it perfectly crispy. crème brûlée, because hers had malfunctioned. Hilariously, store after store, the seemingly ‘motley’ team walked away thinking they might want to use the torch to cook up a more nefarious non-dessert substance. Stories like these brought a lot of laughter for many years to the family, and Alice always laughed.

Years later, after John passed away, you could find Alice in her immaculately decorated apartment, for which Alice had asked a decorator to find a place for many of her beautiful furnishings and decorations from her Southwood home. Her unit was resplendent with chandeliers, framed oil paintings, and antique furniture. And despite years of Alzheimer’s disease in this last phase of life, Alice’s soft laugh and her soft, heartwarming drawl never faltered. She found humor in everything and was witty and happy until the end. “I love you, my dear”, will forever remain an imprint in the memory of his family and his dear friends. We will celebrate and always remember our beloved Alice.

Alice is happily welcomed into Heaven by her late husband, John Pinkney Henderson, her mother and father, Wanda O’Daniel McKee and Clyde V. McKee Sr., and her stepmother Ruth Porter McKee, her brother and sister-in-law , Clyde Vernon McKee Jr. and Mary Louise Bevil McKee, as well as his brother and sister-in-law, John Max McKee and Carolyn McKee.

Alice is survived by her nieces and nephews, great-nieces and nephews, great-grandparents and cousins, for whom fond memories and words like “dear heart” and “little one” will always evoke gratitude for having been bound. to such a wonderful human being and delicious soul. Family members mourning her loss include niece, Ann McKee Calhoun and her spouse Kent of McKinney, TX, and grandnephews, John Kent Calhoun and her spouse Kerregan, Cameron Calhoun and her spouse Brooke and son Cason; nephew, Clyde V. McKee III “Tad” and wife Terese of Orange, TX, and grandniece, Emily McKee Mellen and wife Austin, and grandnephew, Robert McKee and wife Sarah and son Colbin; niece, Wanda McKee Fowler and spouse Roger of Houston, TX, and great-nieces, Alex and Julia Fowler; and nephew, Cooper McKee and wife Mary of Allen, TX, and grandnieces, Kelly McKee Davis and wife Houston, Carrie McKee and her daughter Raven, and Carolyn McKee and her daughters Tori, Sienna and Sierra; cousins, Dan and Connie Massie of Germantown, TN, and their families; niece Sherill and spouse Bob Stewart of Round Rock, TX, and grandnephew, Clark and spouse Patricia; niece, Lanell Hays and spouse Rick Friedman of Los Angeles, CA; niece, Nancy Crist Fairchild of Altanta, GA, and grandniece, Elizabeth Cervantes and wife Jose, and sons Max and Gus, and great-niece, Kate Fairchild and great-nephew, Mac Fairchild and wife Elisabeth, nephew John Crist of ‘Atlanta, GA, and great-nephew Robbie Crist and his wife Nena, and great-niece Mary Harlan Haskins and wife Patrick and children Aidan and Jace; niece JoAnne Crist of Dallas, TX, and grandnephew Tom Crist and spouse Mallory and daughter Shayna Blair.

Alice is also survived by many dear friends, helpers and babysitters, whom Alice considered family over the many years she had known them. This includes the Care Coordinator, Shirley Buckley, caregivers: Phyllis McCaskill, Shirley Gordon, Tonya Moore, Vera Johnson and Dorothy Walker, as well as nurses and staff at The Orchard.

A visit will be held from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. on Sunday, September 19, 2021, at the First Baptist Church of Jackson (431 N. State St., Jackson, MS, 39201).

The funeral will follow at 2:00 p.m., also at the First Baptist Church of Jackson, Minister President Tom Washburn, followed by a funeral service at Lakewood Funeral Home and Memorial Park (6011 Clinton Blvd, Jackson, MS, 39209).

Honorary bearers will be Clyde V. “Tad” McKee, III, Cooper McKee, Robert McKee, Kent Calhoun, Cameron Calhoun, John Kent Calhoun, Roger Fowler, Houston Davis IV, Austin Mellen, Dan Massie, Bob Stewart, Coleman Lowry, Bill Sistrunk and Otis Johnson.

Contributions can be made on her behalf to the John P. and Wanda Alice Henderson Council Fellowship at the University of Mississippi. To contribute, send checks with the name of the endowment listed in the line of the memo to the University of Mississippi Foundation, 406 University Ave., University, MS 38655; or visit www.umfoundation.com/makeagift; or contact 662-915-5944 or umf@umfoundation.com.


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Florence County Museum takes top honors for Kindred Spirit exhibit | Local News http://russellchatham.com/florence-county-museum-takes-top-honors-for-kindred-spirit-exhibit-local-news/ http://russellchatham.com/florence-county-museum-takes-top-honors-for-kindred-spirit-exhibit-local-news/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 18:50:00 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/florence-county-museum-takes-top-honors-for-kindred-spirit-exhibit-local-news/ Kindred Spirit uses works of art from the museum’s main collections as well as selections on loan from major partner institutions to interpret Johnson’s life through the lens of the important relationships that defined his development. Of particular significance are the recently acquired works of art at Voll Nachlass Sammlung in Denmark. The breadth of […]]]>

Kindred Spirit uses works of art from the museum’s main collections as well as selections on loan from major partner institutions to interpret Johnson’s life through the lens of the important relationships that defined his development. Of particular significance are the recently acquired works of art at Voll Nachlass Sammlung in Denmark. The breadth of selections spans 20 years of the artist’s life and includes oil paintings, watercolors, screen prints, prints, relief prints, textiles and sculptures, with subjects ranging from portraiture, genre scenes, landscapes and still lifes, as well as biblical and historical imagery.

For many visitors, exhibitions are the public face of museums. Effective planning, resource management, research and interpretation, maintenance of collections, public programs, publications and fundraising all contribute to the accomplishment of a museum’s mission. Expectations and standards were exceptionally high for this year’s candidates. The SEMC Exhibition Competition received a record number of entries from a wide variety of Southeastern museums.

The winners will be celebrated at the 2021 Annual Meeting Awards Ceremony on October 27, 2021 in Chattanooga, TN, as well as in the Fall 2021 edition of INSIDE SEMC, a digital publication of the Southeastern Museums Conference . This designation recognizes the contribution of the Florence County Museum to professional standards in museums in the Southeast.


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‘Reclusive’ artist of impressionist painting http://russellchatham.com/reclusive-artist-of-impressionist-painting/ http://russellchatham.com/reclusive-artist-of-impressionist-painting/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 06:07:00 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/reclusive-artist-of-impressionist-painting/ When artist Chen Junde (1931-2019) made his last painting “Forget-me-not”, he surprised viewers with his use of brilliant hues of blooming petals and warm sunshine, especially given his condition. of extremely precarious health. “The Art and Literature of Chen Junde: A Painter of Modernity”, an exhibition on display at the Liu Haisu Art Museum until […]]]>

When artist Chen Junde (1931-2019) made his last painting “Forget-me-not”, he surprised viewers with his use of brilliant hues of blooming petals and warm sunshine, especially given his condition. of extremely precarious health.

“The Art and Literature of Chen Junde: A Painter of Modernity”, an exhibition on display at the Liu Haisu Art Museum until October 7, offers a retrospective view of this “master of colors”.

In 2017, Chen’s first solo exhibition was held at the National Art Museum of China in Beijing despite the fact that he was already recognized as one of the best impressionist painters in China. Chen, who was 80 at the time, knew it would be his first, and also his last solo show. However, he did not give up painting during his remaining days.

Courtesy of Liu Haisu Art Museum

A self-portrait of Chen Junde in 1963

Visitors to the exhibition will find his words written on the back of the “Forget-me-not” canvas created in 2018: “What prompted a body with a serious illness to paint? asked, just the passion for art. Yes, I ‘burned’ my life with art until it died out. “

As one of China’s most important oil painters and educators, Chen preferred to keep a low profile and was considered a “lonely artist.”

The exhibition features a collection of his Impressionist paintings from different periods, along with related materials and images, providing a panoramic view of the veteran artist.

It is rare that four exhibition halls in the Liu Haisu Art Museum are all dedicated to one artist, reflecting Chen’s steadfast academic status in the art community.

Born in Shanghai in 1937, Chen graduated from the Shanghai Drama Academy in 1960 and was mentored by Yan Wenliang (1893-1988) and Min Xiwen, 103, two big names in modern art history. Chinese.

The exhibition includes not only several paintings by his teachers, but also letters they wrote to him.

It is interesting to find works created by Yan and Chen with the same subject, like “The Bund”, but with different styles.

In addition to his academy teachers, Chen tried to learn from other Chinese masters, including Lin Fengmian (1900-1991), Liu Haisu (1896-1994) and Guan Liang (1900-1986), all masters of Chinese modern art.

The exhibition presents the connection between Chen and these masters.

In the 1960s, Chen visited Lin, who was living alone on Nanchang Road. Chen brought oil paintings with him, and Lin told him to paint flexibly and freely. He even broke a plaster figurine in front of him to remind the young man that “art must leave the imagination to the spectators”. Lin once gave Chen a painting, which he unfortunately lost after moving several times.

But viewers can still see Lin’s strong influence on Chen’s canvas titled “The River in My Hometown” created in 1980, referencing the preferred earthy tone Lin would adopt, which might be a special respect for his teacher. .

Another highlight is two side-by-side canvases created by Liu and Chen under the same title – “Fuxing Park”.

In fact, both paintings were created at the same time and in the same place – at Fuxing Park in 1977.

'Reclusive' artist of impressionist painting

Courtesy of Liu Haisu Art Museum

“Fuxing Park after a fresh snow” by Chen Junde, oil on canvas, 1977

Chen once recalled, “It was not the painting technique that I learned from these masters, but rather their enthusiasm for the art and their moral position.

Unlike elders in the art community, Chen came of age when Socialist Realism was the dominant style of painting. While his peers were busy mastering the Russian style, Chen followed his heart, leaning over books on Impressionism.

He read French literature and coveted Impressionist paintings during the dark days of the “Cultural Revolution” (1966-76).

He believed in the saying of Ilya Repin (1844-1930) that no master had ever graduated from an art academy, so he was completely fed up when his teachers gave him so many line drawings and portraits. He wondered why they stuck to the Russian style, since Slavic culture is so different from Chinese culture.

The romantic world of Impressionism captured his imagination with a world filled with light, shadow and softness.

In the late 1980s, Chen rose to fame in Hong Kong, and one of his paintings sold for around US $ 100,000. In 1999, the French government invited him to spend six months in Paris.

With Vincent van Gogh, he had a revelation: “I thought I knew his studio, this sunny and neat piece of his paintings. The actual room, however, was dark and damp. It was when I saw the play that I realized that van Gogh was painting the sun in his heart. “

Rich colors and wild lines bring out the weighty qualities under his brush. Whether it’s flowers, the old French concession, or the southern Chinese scene, Montmartre and nudes all share a strong and unique artistic style that belongs only to Chen.

'Reclusive' artist of impressionist painting

Courtesy of Liu Haisu Art Museum

“The Street Where There Was a Bronze Statue of Pushkin” by Chen Junde, oil on canvas, 1977

Exhibition information

Dates: Until October 7 (closed Mondays), 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Location: Liu Haisu Art Museum

Address: 1609 Yan’an Road West.


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The artist from Diamond Mountain; Charles de Limur named Napa Library Featured Artist in September | Lifestyles http://russellchatham.com/the-artist-from-diamond-mountain-charles-de-limur-named-napa-library-featured-artist-in-september-lifestyles/ http://russellchatham.com/the-artist-from-diamond-mountain-charles-de-limur-named-napa-library-featured-artist-in-september-lifestyles/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 19:00:00 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/the-artist-from-diamond-mountain-charles-de-limur-named-napa-library-featured-artist-in-september-lifestyles/ “Everyone has a theme,” he continued. “When you open this one, ‘where there’s smoke, there’s fire,’ you see what the forest looked like before. “ Other disaster boxes included the themes of the volcano, the tsunami and the Covid. While selecting paintings to hang in his exhibition at the library, de Limur spoke about his […]]]>

“Everyone has a theme,” he continued. “When you open this one, ‘where there’s smoke, there’s fire,’ you see what the forest looked like before. “

Other disaster boxes included the themes of the volcano, the tsunami and the Covid.

While selecting paintings to hang in his exhibition at the library, de Limur spoke about his artistic influences.

San Francisco to Paris and back

Born in San Francisco in 1954, he lived in Paris from 1960 to 1968 before returning to City by the Bay.

“Growing up in Paris and Europe, with direct exposure to Impressionists and Pointillism, as well as subsequent exposure to the California Colorist movement, all had a lasting influence,” he said.

He graduated from Oberlin College with a Bachelor of Fine Arts, where he focused on art, theater, and communications.

“My influences are very 19th century,” said de Limur. “Camile Pissarro, Edward Vuillard and Francis Picabia – as a mid-career painter before turning to Da-Da – are my most influential painters.”

Artist Robert Stark of the Susquehannah Studio in Uniondale, Pa. Has been – and still is – a strong influence. Stark has been his mentor and friend since 1978. For a time, de Limur was artist in residence at the Art Exchange Gallery and the Susquehannah Studio.


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