Oil Paintings – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 02:52:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://russellchatham.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2.png Oil Paintings – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ 32 32 ‘Small Works’ exhibition in Bristol features 70 works https://russellchatham.com/small-works-exhibition-in-bristol-features-70-works/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/small-works-exhibition-in-bristol-features-70-works/ Works by Thomas Terceira and Rosario Romare of Cranston and Warwick, respectively, are currently on display as part of a new community exhibition, Small jobs, a compilation of two-dimensional works of drawings, paintings, photographs, prints or collages at the Bristol Art Museum, in partnership with the Rogers Free Library. The exhibit can be viewed through […]]]>

Works by Thomas Terceira and Rosario Romare of Cranston and Warwick, respectively, are currently on display as part of a new community exhibition, Small jobs, a compilation of two-dimensional works of drawings, paintings, photographs, prints or collages at the Bristol Art Museum, in partnership with the Rogers Free Library. The exhibit can be viewed through December 16 in the Library’s Community Galleries, located across from the museum. The exhibit was judged by Rhode Island artist Rina Naik.

The Small Works the exhibition includes 70 works of art, six of which were chosen for recognition. Pieces are two-dimensional in shape and limited to 12 inches on each side. Big in imagination, but small in size, Small jobs offers artists the opportunity to share a wide variety of styles, media and subjects.

Terceira’s collage, Lady Slipper, and Romare’s photographs After the Storm and Behind the Helm, were selected for the exhibition.

“The theme of Small Works the exhibition resonated with me, as much of my work is on a smaller scale,” said Naik, guest curator at the Bristol Art Museum. “For this reason, I know very well the joys and challenges of creating works at these sizes. It was a pleasure to see the variety of themes and media represented in the submissions. The artists took this opportunity to showcase a wide variety of subjects ranging from landscapes to a close-up image of beautiful lips and everything in between. Their artistic insights made us see the familiar in a new way on a small scale.”

Naik, the juror, is an Asian Native American artist who primarily focuses on oil painting using the medium of cold wax. Lately she has been exploring mixed media pieces on paper and panel with sumi ink, acrylic inks, asemic writing, Japanese papers, and more. She is inspired by the landscapes of New England, in particular the plein air painting on the Cape. Naik shares “New England landscapes are magical in their beauty” and created a series of mini-paintings called Wanderings of Truro.

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Bach Face – CounterPunch.org https://russellchatham.com/bach-face-counterpunch-org/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 18:22:47 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/bach-face-counterpunch-org/ Unearthed musical manuscripts of previously unknown works by great composers are making headlines. But discoveries that don’t involve scores can be even more revealing in the texture and depth they give to the lives and works of musicians. Music is never just notes. As countless record covers confirm, the faces of musicians are key to […]]]>

Unearthed musical manuscripts of previously unknown works by great composers are making headlines. But discoveries that don’t involve scores can be even more revealing in the texture and depth they give to the lives and works of musicians. Music is never just notes.

As countless record covers confirm, the faces of musicians are key to evoking feelings, evoking a sense of connection with the performer or composer, with the sounds we hear on LPs, in the concert hall or in our heads. Annette Richard’s The Hall of Fame and Friendship: Portraits, Music and History in the CPE Bach Circle is a masterful, yet intimate study of musician portraits that carefully examines faces for their crucial, if often elusive, meanings. His visual sensitivity is matched only by his fine hearing for the music associated with these faces and the social worlds they inhabit. Just as any image can be seen from different angles and in different lights and will tell us different things at different times, this book presents diverse and thought-provoking perspectives on portraits of musicians, constantly reminding us that music is an activity that brings people together in thought, action and feeling.

His magnificent and lavishly produced book paints an admiring and illuminating portrait of Carl Philip Emanuel Bach, the most famous member of his famous family in the 18e century, more renowned than his father, Johann Sebastian.

Emanuel was revered by thinkers and musicians of his time, from Diderot to Haydn to Mozart. The eminent Hamburg poet Friedrich Gottlieb Klopstock wrote his friend’s epitaph in 1788:

Don’t wait for imitators,
Because you must blush if you stay.
Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach,
deepest harmonist,
Newness and beauty united;
Was great
In text stems
But bigger still
In bold, wordless music;
Surpassed the inventor of keyed instruments,
‘Cause he elevated the art of performance
Through teaching
And practice
To its perfection.

Unlike his many brothers and their father, CPE Bach was artistically celebrated and financially successful. Some of the proceeds from his profitable publications for the nascent keyboard music market went to feed his habit of collecting: even until the last months of his life he continued to fill his collections with portraits; these were mostly etchings (rather than single images), but included drawings, oil paintings, plaster busts, and silhouettes. Figures ranged from musical gods – Pan, Apollo and Mercury, to musical polymaths Johannes Kepler and Benjamin Franklin, to musicians, both famous and obscure, ranging from Bach’s time two hundred years ago and including men and women mainly from Germany but also from everywhere. Europe.

Richards describes the intense discussion and widespread emulation of Bach’s collection. His holdings bolstered his own fame, but were also an essential means of staying in touch with the musicians of his day. There was nothing Meta in this social network: Bach’s faces were to be seen, held and heard.

The musical man of letters, Englishman Charles Burney visited Bach in 1772 and in his travel journal described the thrill of hearing the great man play surrounded by the images of so many musicians, including the face from JS Bach himself:

The moment I walked in [his house], Mr. Bach conducted me up the stairs, into a large and elegant music room, furnished with pictures, drawings, and prints by more than one hundred and fifty eminent musicians: among whom there are many English , and original oil portraits of his father and grandfather. After I had looked at these, Mr. Bach was kind enough to sit down in front of his Silbermann clavichordand instrument of choice, on which he played three or four of his most selected and most difficult compositions, with the delicacy, precision and wit for which he is so justly celebrated among his countrymen.

CPE Bach. Pastel by Johann Philipp Bach, circa 1777.

Burney had undertaken his travels in Europe in order to carry out research for his General History of Music, the first volume of which appeared a few years after the visit to Hamburg. The portraits, especially those assembled by C.P.E. Bach, played an important role in the conception of the history of music found in the first comprehensive works devoted to the subject by Burney and his German counterparts. Coming from the most venerable of musical families, Bach has nurtured a deep sense of history and his place in it.

As Richards shows, the anecdotes that characterized these stories can be seen not just as annotations to a gallery of pictures, but as an attempt to flesh out faces with musical temperament and bring the past to life, long before the era of recorded sound. .

Because of CPE Bach’s musical prestige and the renown of his collection, his portraits were coveted by enthusiasts and admirers. Bach had hoped that the collection would remain intact after his death – a dream of many collectors. It was eventually dispersed, with much of it being picked up by those close to the composer and his family. Bach cataloged not only his musical compositions, but also his collection of portraits; this meticulous inventory shows the importance of the two works for the artist.

CPE Bach’s love for art, and more particularly for portraiture, must also have contributed to the career of his second son, named after his illustrious grandfather. Johann Sebastian Bach the Younger was a promising artist, who often aided his own father’s collecting interests through his connections in the art world and his own talent for capturing likenesses. Unforgettable is the distressed letter in which CPE Bach laments the death of his son at the age of 29 while studying art in Rome.

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Drawing of JS Bach the Younger by Adamd Friedrich Oese, 1778.

Already two decades ago, Richards suspected that many of these portraits had made their way to the Berlin State Library, along with much of the Bach family music. With CPE Bach’s painstaking descriptions in hand, she searched through countless drawers of manuscript cards in the library’s huge collections of musical portraits and eventually found almost a third of Bach’s personal photos. Most of them were prints, some with Bach’s flickering handwriting indicating subject, artist, and inventory number. More dramatic was Richards’ discovery of original designs, some by important North German and Italian artists.

One spring morning in 2004, I was tending to old musical manuscripts in the Berlin State Library in close proximity to Richards (those shy multi-syllabics probably don’t quite count as full disclosure, so here goes: I am married to the author of The Hall of Fame and Friendship). Annette was waiting for the first trolley of portraits she had been able to order after almost a year of patience and politeness A person holding a sign Description automatically generated with medium confidencecurious.

At that time, the library’s music reading room still shone in all its East German glory: blond plywood, brown rugs, Sputnik lamps. This cocoon of socialist socialist chic inside the imposing war-scarred Prussian edifice came to an end in the fateful year of 1914.

To our left, at the long table, an American musicologist was examining a manuscript with a magnifying glass. To our right, a beleaguered German PhD. student looked at a stack of treatises. Across the table, having just arrived in the library well after opening time, a grey-haired American professor was jostling his attractive young assistant, both apparently more concerned with deciphering each other than Beethoven’s sketchbook in front of them. At the end of the table, a Japanese scholar put on his white gloves.

The cart arrived for Annette and she carefully pulled out the first image from her folder. You could feel every eye in the room lift from their work and watch the face of Madame Benda, one of the great singers of the time, shine in the morning light pouring through the high windows.

Maria Felicitas Benda (1756 to after 1788). Drawing by Johann Andreas Herterich, 1781.

One of the most welcome results of Richards’ project over many years is that these drawings rescued from the acid-rich files in which they had long been stored have now been preserved to modern archival standards.

Richards also made discoveries in other libraries and, using images of Bach as well as copies of his prints from other archives, she pieced together her collection. Over the following years, she prepared a catalog of the collection with reproductions of the images for the publication of the complete works of CPE Bach. In 2010 she organized an exhibition of portraits at the Bach-Archiv in Leipzig, the first opportunity for the public to see them.

In the newly published book, the culmination of all these efforts, Richards makes many fascinating connections between the people depicted and Bach himself; his contemporaries were proud to be part of Bach’s collection, as inscribed in an 18eLast Century Music Hall of Fame.

Not only the eminent and historical actors, but also the now forgotten actors of the European stage, ignited Bach’s collecting imagination. These curiosities seem to say as much about the past as great figures like Haydn, Gluck, Rosseau and Benjamin Franklin (inventor of the glass harmonica). The book includes a rare copy of Polish cello prodigy Nicolaus Zygmuntowski, who has performed across Europe at major venues such as the Concert Spirituel in Paris. Richards tells us that Bach’s disciple Ernst Ludwig Gerber, whose important biographical dictionary of musicians from 1790 includes a long appendix devoted to portraits, reports that Zygmuntowski “died at the age of eleven, after being overworked, beaten and starved by his father. “Prodigies are often older than their masters claim, though this is a stark summary of the rampant exploitation of musically gifted children that has tainted the 18e century. Zygmuntowski died a few years before Bach himself. It is suspected that Bach was aware of the fate of the young Pole. Maybe he even reported it to Gerber. These portraits were not only meant to capture the drama of the human face, but also the stories behind them, to be seen, in the case of Zygmuntowki in his stoic, slightly stunned expression.

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Nicolas Zygmuntowski (around 17771-1782/86). Engraving by Carl Salzer (1740-1784).

When Bach sat at his clavichord and played alone or in company, he must also have enjoyed being watched by his father and so many other musicians, living and dead. Maybe he liked to think they were listening too. I have no doubt that the music he made derives its strength not only from their compositions and the memory of their performances, but from the presence of their faces on its walls. Return to this world of sensations and music, of images and hearing, in The Hall of Fame and Friendship.

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Heartbreak over lack of progress in kidnapping Megumi Yokota https://russellchatham.com/heartbreak-over-lack-of-progress-in-kidnapping-megumi-yokota/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 06:30:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/heartbreak-over-lack-of-progress-in-kidnapping-megumi-yokota/ KAWASAKI — The mother of Japan’s most famous kidnapping victim has spoken of the indescribable void that fills her days as she marks the 45th anniversary of her daughter’s disappearance on November 15. Megumi Yokota was abducted by North Korean agents in 1977 from a beach near her home in Niigata facing the Sea of […]]]>

KAWASAKI — The mother of Japan’s most famous kidnapping victim has spoken of the indescribable void that fills her days as she marks the 45th anniversary of her daughter’s disappearance on November 15.

Megumi Yokota was abducted by North Korean agents in 1977 from a beach near her home in Niigata facing the Sea of ​​Japan after attending a club activity at her high school. She was 13 years old.

“I can’t express how empty I feel,” his 86-year-old mother, Sakie, told a news conference in Kawasaki where she now lives.

Having not heard from her daughter in all these years and not knowing her daughter’s precise whereabouts or even if she will ever return to Japan, Sakie called on the government to immediately hold summit talks between the leaders of the Japan and North Korea and to “think wisely about how to make both sides happy.

“She disappeared like a puff of smoke. I looked for it, but I couldn’t find anything. I felt a huge sense of loss,” Sakie said.

In the grip of grief, Sakie took a painting class. She said she sometimes sketched her daughter’s portrait as the tears flowed freely. She said these were some of her toughest days, but “the paintings helped me”.

At the November 8 press conference, Sakie showed two of her oil paintings. One, entitled “Small fishing port”, presents a nearby fishing port. It was painted around 1978, shortly after Megumi disappeared.

Given its location, she painted it red as if dusk was falling. “If I had painted a normal blue sea, I would have felt fear and sadness,” she said.

In 2014, Sakie and her husband Shigeru, who died in 2020, traveled to Mongolia, where they met Megumi’s daughter Kim Eun Gyong and her family.

“My husband seemed very happy to see the woman who looked so much like Megumi.” said Sakie. “We were able to have such a great time with (our granddaughter).”

Sakie continued, “I wonder if something mysterious will ever happen again.”

“Kidnapping victims now live in despair, but there will surely come a day when they will be blessed,” she said.

Megumi is one of at least 17 Japanese citizens who the Japanese government says were abducted by North Korea in the late 1970s and early 1980s. They were primarily required to train North Korean spies in Japanese language, culture, and customs.

North Korea admitted to snatching her, but said she died in captivity. Japan did not accept this explanation.

Little is known about her life in North Korea, except that she married a South Korean abductee and had a child.

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Ruholamin unveils a new painting on the terrorist attack in Shiraz https://russellchatham.com/ruholamin-unveils-a-new-painting-on-the-terrorist-attack-in-shiraz/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 14:32:13 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/ruholamin-unveils-a-new-painting-on-the-terrorist-attack-in-shiraz/ TEHRAN – Iranian expressionist Hassan Ruholamin unveiled another book on the Shiraz terrorist attack on Thursday. In a statement, he dedicated the untitled painting to Shah Cheragh, the shrine of Ahmad ibn Musa (AS), the brother of Imam Reza (AS), where ISIS carried out the attack that claimed the life to 13 people. “This sad […]]]>

TEHRAN – Iranian expressionist Hassan Ruholamin unveiled another book on the Shiraz terrorist attack on Thursday.

In a statement, he dedicated the untitled painting to Shah Cheragh, the shrine of Ahmad ibn Musa (AS), the brother of Imam Reza (AS), where ISIS carried out the attack that claimed the life to 13 people.

“This sad incident saddened you at first,” Ruholamin addressed Ahmad ibn Musa (as) and said, “Because they [victims of the attack] were your guests and pilgrims to your sanctuary.

Best known for his paintings of early Islamic historical events, Ruholamin previously used the terrorist attack as the subject of his painting ‘Tulips sprouted blood from the youth of our land’, which was unveiled the day after the assault. .

The title is inspired by a verse of the famous epic poem composed by Aref Qazvini for the Iranian youth killed during the Constitutional Revolution (1906-1911).

The artist has also mixed modern events and stories from Islamic history in some of his works.

“Aba Abdillah’s Apocalyptic Companion” is one such painting, which Ruholamin created in memory of Quds Force commander Lt. Gen. Qassem Soleimani, just hours after he was assassinated in an air raid. American in Baghdad on January 3, 2020.

In June, Ruholamin depicted the story of the Rain Prayer by Imam Reza (as), the eighth Imam of the Shias, in his painting.

“The Rain Prayer” was unveiled at the Imam Reza (as) shrine in Mashhad as part of the Imam’s birthday celebration.

The 2.4 x 3 meter oil painting depicts Imam Reza (as) on a rock with people around him praying for rain.

The story of the rain prayer happened months after Mamun, the Abbasid Caliph, appointed Imam Reza (as) as successor to his throne.

The region of Khorasan was affected by a severe drought, linked to the choice of the opponents of the Imam who said: “You see? Since Ali ibn Musa al-Reza was chosen as crown prince, no more rain has been sent to us from the sky.

Mamun was told about the unfavorable comments and asked Imam Reza (AS) to hold a prayer for rain, so the Imam with a group of people left the city to hold a prayer for rain in the desert. After they returned to their homes, the rain began to fall.

The painting was part of Ruholamin’s contract with the Imam Reza (AS) International Foundation for Culture and the Arts, based on which he was commissioned to produce paintings on the Imam’s life.

Photo: New painting by Hassan Ruholamin on the terrorist attack in Shiraz.

MMS/YAW

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Ann McCoy, Paulina Peavy and Olga Spiegel – The Brooklyn Rail https://russellchatham.com/ann-mccoy-paulina-peavy-and-olga-spiegel-the-brooklyn-rail/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 22:13:47 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/ann-mccoy-paulina-peavy-and-olga-spiegel-the-brooklyn-rail/ In sight Andrew Edlin Gallery Ann McCoy, Paulina Peavy and Olga SpiegelFrom October 28 to December 3, 2022New York I invoke supernatural beingsWho invented the firstTransmogsIn the stuff of life.You did it for your own amusement.Come back down, be happy to reviveThis rebirth of these wonders… —Tales of OvidTed Hughes The Hilma af Klint exhibition […]]]>

In sight

Andrew Edlin Gallery
Ann McCoy, Paulina Peavy and Olga Spiegel
From October 28 to December 3, 2022
New York

I invoke supernatural beings
Who invented the first
Transmogs
In the stuff of life.
You did it for your own amusement.
Come back down, be happy to revive
This rebirth of these wonders…
Tales of OvidTed Hughes

The Hilma af Klint exhibition at the Guggenheim and the art world’s growing desire for diversity and inclusion have opened the doors to dialogue with the immaterial realm. Modernism’s distaste for the mystical, the heretical, the spiritual and the divine is perhaps no longer the dominant feeling. In this astonishing exhibition, we discover the work of three women whose visionary practices show us lives lived in the service of a reflection on the immaterial. Although their philosophical explorations are different, McCoy, Peavy and Spiegel all work through personal cosmologies guided by forms of knowledge outside mainstream critical discourse. Peavy was in contact with entities on the astral plane, channeling an extraterrestrial being; Olga Spiegel, also a devotee of astro-culture, is part of a movement of visionary artists, and Ann McCoy is a fifty-year-old student of alchemy (she worked with Jung’s heir, Dr CA Meier for decades) whose art finds its origin in dreams and visions. Critical support for these practices is an exciting prospect. Paulina Peavy (1901–1999) has only recently been rediscovered by curators and scholars, and her 2021 Beyond Baroque was his first California exhibition in seventy-five years. Although McCoy and Spiegel are both in their 70s, their work has rarely been seen in New York since the 1990s. This long-awaited exhibition is a breathtaking discovery and a necessary rediscovery.

Ann McCoy’s large scale colored pencil drawing, Dream of the Invisible College (2018), fills an end wall. In the drawing, we see the artist asleep, surrounded by spirits, with the Invisible College presented as a church-like structure that one enters through the imagination. The Invisible College has been mentioned in Rosicrucian manifestos and is linked to alchemists like Robert Fludd, Michael Meier, Francis Bacon and John Dee. It represents a set of learning acquired through dreams rather than books. The artist believes that alchemical transformation has its origins in the unconscious and that alchemical processes describe the psychological stages of development. McCoy’s work exudes a rare blend of dedication to craftsmanship and scholarship. In this way, she resembles another Irish artist and alchemy student, Leonora Carrington. The level of detail in McCoy’s drawing is significant, the passage of time felt by each repetition of the pencil’s mark, yet the work floats ethereal in immeasurable dreamtime. This physical rooting and this immaterial attraction guide the spectator, apparently unmoored, on a journey of reverie.

In the second gallery we see some of Paulina Peavy’s later cartographic works, Untitled (1984) and a Fantasy from approx. 1980. Like McCoy, Peavy (1901–1999) was a student of esoteric teachings ranging from Rudolf Steiner to Theosophical writers like Annie Besant and Mrs. Alice A. Bailey and was involved in Los Angeles Theosophical study groups that included the painter Agnes Pelton. At the home of Ida L. Ewing in Santa Ana, California, she attended a seance in which she channeled an extraterrestrial presence named Lacamo. From then on, Lacamo guides his hand and paints his works to create a complex cosmology of cycles of four seasons and three thousand years. In its last winter phase, the cosmology included hermaphroditic beings. Blending abstract and natural forms, Peavey channeled the otherworldly into shimmering, luminous colors to convey poignant messages to humanity.

Olga Spiegel was born in Europe and trained in Old Master painting techniques with Ernst Fuchs, one of the founders of fantastic realism. She came to New York in the sixties and was influenced by surrealism, psychedelic art and science fiction, as well as astro-culture and space travel. Spiegel uses the word pareidolia – a psychological phenomenon involving a stimulus (an image or sound) in which the mind perceives a familiar pattern of something where none actually exists – to describe its process. His canvases thus function like a crystal ball in which one looks as the forms emerge. Bordering surrealist techniques like blotting and frottage, his work merges abstract layers, organic forms and symbolic images. In the painting watch the light (1985), figures sit with their backs to the viewer, gazing intently at a world bathed in light, as if a gently glowing future spirit offers respite from the world of darkness.

Spiegel’s paintings appear intuitive rather than engaged with complex systems promoting a philosophical worldview like those of Peavy and McCoy. In the first case, cosmology ventures into the future, into a realm of ufology and in the second, an alchemical worldview spans medieval metaphysics and modern physics. What is remarkable about this exhibition is the unique dedication of each artist. Involving years of deeply personal, sometimes solitary exploration, these women bring us work that vividly explores the unseen life of life. As in Edwin Abbott’s Victorian science fiction novel Flatland: a multifaceted romance (1884), these works question the limits of dimensional prejudice, instead offering a speculative journey through an active expansion of the imaginary. Simply put, he feels marvellous.

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Zabeel House by Jumeirah, The Greens hosts works by artist Tara Sabz https://russellchatham.com/zabeel-house-by-jumeirah-the-greens-hosts-works-by-artist-tara-sabz/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 10:15:25 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/zabeel-house-by-jumeirah-the-greens-hosts-works-by-artist-tara-sabz/ Tara Sabz creates stories through her art. Mohammad Yusuf, Feature Writer Project Art, the interactive initiative and community program designed to provide Dubai’s top artists with a free space to exhibit their work, is back with Iranian painter Tara Sabz, who will be exhibiting a range of her works. Hosted at Zabeel House by Jumeirah, […]]]>

Tara Sabz creates stories through her art.

Mohammad Yusuf, Feature Writer

Project Art, the interactive initiative and community program designed to provide Dubai’s top artists with a free space to exhibit their work, is back with Iranian painter Tara Sabz, who will be exhibiting a range of her works. Hosted at Zabeel House by Jumeirah, The Greens, the three-week Project Art residency runs until November 18, with the self-taught artist showcasing her watercolour-based art, which she says is primarily inspired by everyday life. and the beauties of nature – scenes often overlooked or ignored.

“I’m really excited to be part of Project Art, an initiative that has seen a range of amazing artists showcasing their work,” said Sabz, who has participated in several exhibitions as well as World Art Dubai 2022. As someone who has loved and embraced art all my life, I look forward to introducing it to both property guests and curious visitors.

“The community spirit of Zabeel House is famous in the local art scene and I think people will really enjoy learning about water art while I complete my residency.” She was born in Iran and based in Dubai, specializing in watercolor and mixed media art. She has been interested in painting since she was a child “and so far I have never overlooked any opportunity to learn,” she says. After beginning her artistic life, she took drawing and painting lessons with renowned teachers.

Jara Sabz is an artist based in Dubai.

She started with black and colored pencils and also made hyper-realistic works. Hyperrealism is a genre of painting and sculpture resembling high-resolution photography. It is considered an advance in photorealism by the methods used to create the resulting paintings or sculptures. The term primarily applies to an independent art movement and art style in the United States and Europe that has developed since the early 1970s.

Shortly after, Sabz started painting in oils and over the years she made her way and fell in love with watercolor and mixed media. She gave many watercolor classes where she felt she could share her art and skills. “I never overlooked any opportunity to teach and learn,” she repeats. Due to her interest in watercolour, she continued her work as a watercolourist. Later, she realized that as an artist she had to use all possible tools in creating art. “Art is limitless,” she discovered.

His inspirations are mainly his imagination, everyday life and the beauties of nature – incredible offerings that we pass by without a second thought. The United Arab Emirates provided him with a good opportunity to show his works to art lovers. Since then, she has led an active life in the Dubai art scene. “I think the best way to express feelings is through art,” she says. “The beauty of nature inspires me and I use my imagination to portray the beauty of the landscapes that we simply pass through in our daily lives.

“Observing people and the world around me is one of the biggest motivations for me to create a story in my works. “I want people to question my works and themselves and ask themselves if there there is a story they should follow. I aspire to create the world in a different way that brings hope and excitement to people’s hearts and minds. I dream with my paintings and create a more beautiful world for the life in them.

She thanks Zabeel House of Jumeirah, The Greens, for giving her the opportunity to exhibit her work with the aim of “creating unity for the community”. Through the Two Worlds Collided painting that is on display, she wants to express the thought that there will come a day when we will submit to the power of nature. Therefore, we should join forces with the earth and become one with it.

“It’s a single force that’s forever unified,” says Sabz. “This painting shows that we are all part of nature. We are gathered. We are one.” She will lead a live painting session in the lobby on November 4, allowing visitors to observe her work up close – and the process that creates it. She will also be available to answer any questions about her journey and the unique elements of his style of painting, while guests will be able to purchase several of his works on site.

“Project Art is an initiative launched at Zabeel House by Jumeirah, The Greens, to unite the artistic community and give talented artists a space to showcase their work to a diverse audience,” said Marcus Sutton, Managing Director, Zabeel House by Jumeirah , The Green Vegetables. “With the great success of our previous exhibitions, we are confident that Tara’s unique aquatic art will be a hit with regular and new guests at the property. Local artists interested in being involved in future Project Art initiatives can express their interest by contacting Zabeel House by Jumeirah, The Greens, on 04 519 1111.

Born in Dubai, Zabeel House by Jumeirah, The Greens, is an eclectic hotel located in the heart of vibrant The Greens. With claims to be high on design and low-complexity, the hotel offers expected basics and unexpected extras. As the hotel puts it, set in an upscale, laid-back environment, guests can also expect a touch of instinctive hospitality “that has become second nature to the designers of the Burj Al Arab Jumeirah.”

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Matthew Wong’s Melancholy Art Continues to Captivate at First American Museum Exhibit in Dallas https://russellchatham.com/matthew-wongs-melancholy-art-continues-to-captivate-at-first-american-museum-exhibit-in-dallas/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 10:00:52 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/matthew-wongs-melancholy-art-continues-to-captivate-at-first-american-museum-exhibit-in-dallas/ Only one of Matthew Wong’s paintings entered a museum collection during his all-too-short life. He had sent his 2017 painting west at the Karma Gallery booth at that year’s Dallas Art Fair. It depicts a figure dressed in white seated on a hill beside a pair of flowers thrown aside and looking back, away from […]]]>

Only one of Matthew Wong’s paintings entered a museum collection during his all-too-short life. He had sent his 2017 painting west at the Karma Gallery booth at that year’s Dallas Art Fair. It depicts a figure dressed in white seated on a hill beside a pair of flowers thrown aside and looking back, away from the foreground, towards a wide flat land marked only by a pair of trees and a road leading inexorably far away. – perhaps Wong’s cinematic image of the Texas landscape.

Arrived the day before the opening of the fair, he realized that he was not satisfied with the work. He furiously reworked the paint, adding the impossibly dense star field that now populates his night sky – a multitude of tiny luminous marks echoing the somewhat less dense dabs of black paint that dot the landscape of red earth below. And it is this stupendously starry sky that Wong has added, towering over the solitary witness of the landscape, that gives the painting its intensity – its visionary quality, if that is the word for an effect that is as much tactile as it is visual.

In any case, when the curators of the Dallas Museum of Art visited the fair the next day, they must have been just as struck by this strange and fervent painting – somehow both ecstatic and melancholy – as I am today. . The museum has a fund specifically for purchases from the fair, and they used it to acquire this painting by a mostly unknown Canadian artist, whose solo exhibitions to date, of very different works, had been held. in Hong Kong (where he had spent part of his childhood) and Zhongshan, China.

Matthew Wang, west (2017), oil on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Art Fair Foundation Acquisition Fund. Photo: © 2022 Matthew Wong Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Her closest connection to the American gallery scene had come from her participation the previous summer in a pop-up group exhibition curated by Matthew Higgs, director of New York’s venerable alternative space White Columns, in the Hamptons. The exhibition was organized under the auspices of Karma, the gallery that was now trying it out at the Dallas Art Fair. In any case, the painting on the upper part of west was still wet when it entered the DMA collection.

It is fitting, then, that the first US museum exhibition of Wong’s work (and the second, following a previous exhibition at the Art Gallery of Ontario, since the artist’s death by suicide in 2019) takes place at the Dallas Museum of Art, where it is on view through February 19, 2023. The show, hosted by Vivian Le and titled “The Realm of Appearances,” traces Wong’s frantic development.

After earning a master’s degree in photography in 2012, he quickly became dissatisfied with the camera and began to learn drawing and painting on his own. The first works in this exhibition – drawings from 2014, paintings from 2015 – show the artist finding his way, experimenting (sometimes awkwardly) with materials. But Wong was already fixated on the subject that would occupy him for the rest of his life: the landscape and the very small role an individual human plays in the cosmos.

In the rare cases where Wong concentrates, like a portrait, on the human head, as in the diptych banishment from the garden, 2015, the face is practically obliterated. In an untitled ink drawing from 2015, for example, a head is obscured by a dull brushstroke glyph. In the distant background of another work depicting what appears to be a forest of birches—marvelously, the spaces between the trunks are also trunks—a tiny figure observes another in the foreground; I believe it represents the same person observing themselves as if from afar.

Matthew Wong, Once Upon a Time in the West (2018), gouache on paper. Martin and Rebecca Eisenberg. Photo: © 2022 Matthew Wong Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

By 2017, Wong had mastered his personal art style, which could be described as a synthesis of fauvism, folk art, and (as a Western viewer like me gleans from the excellent catalog) the “outdoor” painting movement. new ink” which took root in Hong Kong in the 1960s. He took his propensity for the “contradictory spaces” he admired in the work of Willem de Kooning, or what Lesley Ma , in the catalog, calls “constructions bordering on embarrassing”, with inharmonious juxtapositions of patterns and shapes. and strange manipulations of scale.

One of his favorite motifs – you could even say it’s archetypal – is the road or path that stretches out into the distance. Its purpose is always invisible. But the road never just crosses the landscape; he divides the land, divides it into parts. At the end of Path to the sea (2019), for example, the greyish-blue road appears to float entirely detached from the forest to its left and right; it’s not from the same world.

In a book like The kingdom (2017) – another birch forest image – Wong seems to try to include as many different types of marks as possible; it is the overall distribution of their disharmony that gives the painting its paradoxical unity, a unity that presents a nervous, even agitated surface, but which maintains an inner balance. The ruler of this realm is a tiny crowned figure ensconced in a free-standing vaulted niche, almost imperceptible but at the center of it all. I couldn’t help but wonder if Wong, a lover of poetry, hadn’t thought of the melancholy speaker in Charles Baudelaire’s “Spleen III”: “I am like the king of a rainy country, Rich but helpless, young and yet very old.”

Matthew Wang, river at night (2018), oil on canvas. Collection of Shio Kusaka and Jonas Wood. Photo: © 2022 Matthew Wong Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

But hyperactive compositions like The kingdom were never Wong’s only option. The wish (2016), a deep blue nocturne illuminated only by the thinnest sliver of a yellow moon, shining on a tiny figure crossing a mountain path, shows that he was always ready to leave everything behind rather than pile it all up. his final works of 2018-19 he began to do this more often, notably in the immensely pale, almost monochromatic morning mist (2019)a pure landscape filled with details that only emerge with breathtaking slowness.

Also at this time, interior spaces and still lifes multiplied, but always with a view of the exterior. The single delicate flower in a glass of water which is the ostensible subject of blue night (2018) simply seems to relay a message sent more emphatically by the gloriously blossoming orange tree blazing in the upper right window. This vivid but ambiguous message is the very essence of Wong’s art.

“The Realm of Appearances” is on view at the Dallas Museum of Art, through February 19, 2023.

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Mondrian’s painting has been hanging upside down for 75 years | Piet Mondrian https://russellchatham.com/mondrians-painting-has-been-hanging-upside-down-for-75-years-piet-mondrian/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 22:37:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/mondrians-painting-has-been-hanging-upside-down-for-75-years-piet-mondrian/ Painting of Mondrian wrong on the left and correct on the rightLeft: Badly hung Mondrian painting; right: what it should look like. A painting by Dutch abstract artist Piet Mondrian has hung upside down in various museums since it was first exhibited 75 years ago, an art historian has found, but has warned it could […]]]>

Painting of Mondrian wrong on the left and correct on the right
Left: Badly hung Mondrian painting; right: what it should look like.

A painting by Dutch abstract artist Piet Mondrian has hung upside down in various museums since it was first exhibited 75 years ago, an art historian has found, but has warned it could disintegrate if it was hanging on the right side now.

The 1941 photo, an intricate trellis intertwined with red, yellow, black and blue tape titled New York City I, was first exhibited at New York’s MoMA in 1945 but hung in the art collection of the German Federal State of the North Rhine. -Westphalia in Düsseldorf since 1980.

The way the image is currently hung shows the multicolored lines thickening at the bottom, suggesting an extremely simplified version of a horizon line. However, when curator Susanne Meyer-Büser began researching the museum’s new exhibition on the Dutch avant-garde artist earlier this year, she realized the image should be the other way around.

“The grid thickening should be up high, like a dark sky,” Meyer-Büser said. “Once I pointed it out to the other curators, we realized it was very obvious. I’m 100% sure the photo is the wrong way round.

The work does not bear Mondrian’s signature, perhaps because he had not considered it finished. Photography: Henning Kaiser/DDP/AFP/Getty Images

Indicators suggesting incorrect hanging are many. The oil painting of the same name and size, New York City, which is exhibited in Paris at the Center Pompidou, has the thickening of the lines at the top.

A photograph of Mondrian’s studio, taken a few days after the artist’s death and published in the American lifestyle magazine Town and Country in June 1944, also shows the same image sitting on an easel the other way around.

Meyer-Büser said it’s likely that Mondrian worked by starting his complex overlay with a line just at the top of the frame and then working down, which would also explain why some of the yellow lines stop a few millimeters from the bottom. edge.

“Was it a mistake when someone took the work out of its box? Was anyone negligent while the work was in transit? “said the curator. “It’s impossible to say.”

Part of the problem is that, unlike most of Mondrian’s earlier works, New York City I does not bear the artist’s signature, perhaps because he had not considered it complete.

Despite all the evidence that the work is currently displayed upside down, the work will be shown as it has hung for 75 years in the new Mondrian. Salon Evolution which opens on Saturday in Düsseldorf.

“Adhesive tapes are already extremely loose and hanging by a thread,” Meyer-Büser said. “If you were to flip it now, gravity would pull it in another direction. And that’s now part of the story of the work.

This article was modified on October 28, 2022 because an earlier version misspelled Susanne Meyer-Büser’s last name in several places. This has been corrected.

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Atlantic Sessions music festival returns to Protrush and Portstewart https://russellchatham.com/atlantic-sessions-music-festival-returns-to-protrush-and-portstewart/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 10:41:44 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/atlantic-sessions-music-festival-returns-to-protrush-and-portstewart/ The award-winning Atlantic Sessions music festival returns to Portstewart and Portrush next month. The much-loved event runs from Friday November 18 to Sunday November 20, 2022 with a program of over 30 live concerts taking place across the two beach towns. Audiences can look forward to two days of unmissable performances across a wide variety […]]]>

The award-winning Atlantic Sessions music festival returns to Portstewart and Portrush next month. The much-loved event runs from Friday November 18 to Sunday November 20, 2022 with a program of over 30 live concerts taking place across the two beach towns.

Audiences can look forward to two days of unmissable performances across a wide variety of venues with new additions to the musical track including the newly refurbished Portrush Playhouse, The Station and Elephant Rock.

Programmed by Snow Water on behalf of Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council, this year’s festival will feature some of Atlantic Sessions favorites who have already sold out shows. Famous PORTS, The Bonnevilles, No Oil Paintings and singer-songwriters such as Ciaran Lavery, Matt McGinn and ROE will perform all of their 2022 albums and create new releases, some of which will be showcased at the popular “Sunday Session ” with Ralph McLean. A host of artists, brand new to the festival, will make their debut on the free music trail, including some wonderful local talent. Also look for five of the artists nominated for the 2022 Music Prize, plus new singles, EPs and album releases.

Ports should be one of the highlights of the festival

The Mayor of Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council, Councilor Ivor Wallace, said: “We held our last ‘in-person’ Atlantic sessions in 2019, which were our most successful to date. During Covid our focus shifted online and the virtual event was promoted internationally as part of Tourism Ireland’s ‘Fill Your Heart with Ireland’ campaign. With over 5 million followers on social media, it was a unique opportunity to showcase not only the best talent in the music scene, but also our magnificent destination.

“This year, like many music fans, I am delighted to see it return to its original format, helping us extend the season beyond the normal holiday periods and attracting increased attendance. We are grateful for the support from our venue owners, and visitors can look forward to the warmest of welcomes to Portrush and Portstewart once again.

“As we have seen in previous years, the fantastic variety of free music, at two of our most beautiful coastal locations, is a winning combination for everyone. We are very proud of the continued reputation of Atlantic Session as a place to celebrate emerging talent as well as established artists, and we look forward to another very successful weekend on the Causeway Coast.

Tickets are on sale now for all three flagship events and a limited number of festival passes are available here.

All other Music Trail concerts are free and no reservation is required.

Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council works with hotel partners and Taste Causeway to ensure visitors can access a range of special accommodation and gastronomic offers to enhance their stay. Keep an eye on @atlanticsess for the latest updates. For more visitor information, click here or follow @VisitCauseway on Twitter.

Highlights include:

Ports – toured extensively following the release of their album ‘The Devil is a Songbird’, receiving support from BBC radio 1, BBC Radio 2, BBC Radio 6, BBC Radio Foyle and RTE with performances on the Cerys Matthews show (Radio 6) and Other Voices (RTE). This earned them a strong following. They have over 3 million Spotify plays and 45,000 monthly listeners. They return with a deeper mature sound, lyrically heightened and re-establishing themselves as one of the most interesting and exciting bands in the country. Ports, were actually one of the first bands to take a young artist from Bray on tour with them. Stephen said: ‘I had heard his stuff, I don’t know where we met him. He released a demo that I heard and I had a really good feeling about it. We were working with MCD at the time and I reached out to them and said, “Who’s that guy from Hozier?” They told us one of their guys at MCD was running it. I said ‘We’re going on a tour of Ireland, we’d like him to come and play some gigs with us.’ So it worked, he came to our Belfast show and our Derry show. He’s a really nice guy.

Ceithre Cinn – A unique performance celebrating wonderful artists collectively and individually. Ciaran Lavery is the winner of the NI Music Prize for Best Album. Suzanne Savage is a virtuoso singer, songwriter and first caller for Paul Brady, the RTE Concert Orchestra and many others. Finnian is one of Ireland’s fastest rising musical stars. Matt McGinn is an award-winning and prolific songwriter from the Morne Mountains. Together they form Ceithre Cinn. Their collective debut album was called “True Love” and was written by all four members and recorded live moments later. The song became one of the most played songs on BBC Radio Ulster and RTE Radio 1 that year, having been playlisted on both.

DEER – ROE’s 2020 EP “Things We Don’t Talk About” saw ROE cross 1 million streams on Spotify and was the culmination of 4 years of relentless writing, releasing and touring as an artist completely independent. At 18, she was given a coveted spot on the BBC Introducing Stage at Glastonbury in 2017, which took her to perform across Europe, North America, India and beyond. support local legends Snow Patrol on their 2018/19 UK Arena tour. Winner of Best Emerging Artist-Northern Ireland Music Prize, 2018 and recipient of the PRS Foundation Momentum Fund, 2020, ROE’s music has been used in a television and radio campaign for BBC Music NI, on the show ITV’s ‘The Only Way is Essex’, Channel 4’s ‘Made in Chelsea’ and Netflix’s ‘Terrace House’. ROE released their debut album “It’s When Panic Sets In” in 2022.

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Beauty & Benevolence | review review https://russellchatham.com/beauty-benevolence-review-review/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 05:15:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/beauty-benevolence-review-review/ review review The Mary Bishop Memorial Gallery at the Crawfordsville District Public Library invites the community to view a new exhibit from the Art League of Montgomery County. The ALMC art exhibit is available to the public until November 19 during regular library hours. A limited amount of artwork will be on sale during the […]]]>

review review

The Mary Bishop Memorial Gallery at the Crawfordsville District Public Library invites the community to view a new exhibit from the Art League of Montgomery County.

The ALMC art exhibit is available to the public until November 19 during regular library hours. A limited amount of artwork will be on sale during the exhibition through the circulation service.

This year’s exhibition contains 70 works of art from 11 art league members. Some of the works of art are for sale and the library receives 20% of the price of each piece. Art league members worked in conjunction with library staff to set up this show.

The show includes colorful watercolors by artists Carol Baird, Karen Patton and Leslie Warren. These artists included portraits, views of Lake Chaplain, flowers, and a rooster. Lu Johnson’s portrait titled “Outdoor Girl” will warm the heart as well as her other oil paintings of cardinals and flowers. From a resting tiger to a raccoon, viewers will enjoy Linda Brady’s oil paintings. Kathy Houghton’s attention to detail and fine flower shading will take you back to the blooms in your garden on a beautiful July day.

Anna Dickson presents her views of peaceful landscapes in oil and acrylic. If you’ve done paper art (paper engineering) before, you’ll definitely appreciate the creative cards and containers exhibited by Ruby Burkhart. When you receive a card from Burkhart, you know it was made with love. Mary Lou Dawald, Terri Fyffe and Karen Patton present an exhibit of original handcrafted clay birdhouses and fish. Kathy Steele has photos of wild animals as well as a small collection of artifacts from her recent trip to Africa.

The Art League has had an active presence in this community for over a century. The organization now known as the Art League of Montgomery County was founded in 1896 by a group of 11 women with an interest in art history, sewing, and socializing. The founding principle of beautifying the community through caring and stewardship has remained constant. The league’s activities and focus have varied over the years to reflect the community’s social climate and available talent.

The league continues to work with local organizations to ensure that the arts remain an essential part of our traditions. Recently, the Montgomery County Community Foundation sponsored the league’s preservation project and the award is used to fund the preservation of 19th and 20th century works by local artists. You can view these works at the CDPL which currently houses the ALMC’s permanent art collection and proudly displays these works alongside its own collection. Framed works by local artists, past and present, can be seen primarily on the second floor. This collection also includes the Bicentennial Quilt which hangs in the first floor Reading Room for 11 months each year. It has 42 hand-sewn squares of local history and colorful traditions. The quilt was donated to the community by the league in 1976.

“We are thrilled with the engagement of our community and our current members, and of course we welcome new members at any time,” said Steele, President of the ALMC.

Anyone interested in becoming a member or learning more about the league should send your name and contact information to the Art League of Montgomery County, PO Box 2, Crawfordsville, IN 47933 and you will be contacted by the Membership Committee.

For more information on CDPL hours of operation, visit online at http://www.cdpl.lib.in.us/. If you are an artist or a member of an artist group and would like to exhibit your work at the Mary Bishop Memorial Gallery in 2023, contact Toni Ridgway-Woodall, the Gallery Coordinator at 765-362-2242 for more details.


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