Landscape Artist – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ Sun, 20 Nov 2022 04:29:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://russellchatham.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2.png Landscape Artist – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ 32 32 Murray Fredericks on fire | FilmInk https://russellchatham.com/murray-fredericks-on-fire-filmink/ Sun, 20 Nov 2022 04:29:38 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/murray-fredericks-on-fire-filmink/ The photographer talks about his film project, Flambé. Australian landscape artist Murray Fredericks is renowned for his large-scale photographs of remote and challenging locations. Working both in Australia and overseas, Fredericks’ photo series have taken him to the landscapes of Greenland, Lake Eyre and the Himalayas. His last project is Flambéan observation documentary, which accompanies […]]]>

The photographer talks about his film project, Flambé.

Australian landscape artist Murray Fredericks is renowned for his large-scale photographs of remote and challenging locations.

Working both in Australia and overseas, Fredericks’ photo series have taken him to the landscapes of Greenland, Lake Eyre and the Himalayas.

His last project is Flambéan observation documentary, which accompanies a series of photographs of landscapes with fire as their central theme.

Made with Oscar-nominated team Bentley Dean (co-director) and Tania Nehme (editor), both Tanna fame, the film depicts blazing trees, and often the flame itself, against flooded lakes and rivers, which have been ubiquitous in Australia during the La Niña cycles of 2021 and 2022.

Fredericks chats with FilmInk about how it all started.

How did you Flambé to arrive?

“It’s a completely accidental movie. I asked Bentley Dean to come over, if he could do some sort of five-minute online thing behind the scenes. And he got into it, loved what it was. he saw it, had a really good feeling about it. And I think because there was no script or plan or anything behind it, the whole documentary just happened very nicely and naturally. And when he reviewed the footage with Tania Nehme, the editor, they both decided there was a longer document in there.

Flambé is related to your latest series of photographs that capture burning trees. Can you elaborate more on this subject?

“I am a landscaper. And the theme I’ve been working on for a year and a half is fire in the landscape. What we did was head to many flooded lakes which are temporary; they’re only there in the middle of the desert right now because of all this humidity we’re having this season, and we’ve used pyro cinematic gear to wire the gas lines, out the back of these massive trees in the middle of those lakes and then turn on the gas at sunset or whenever there’s a thunderstorm or something absolutely dramatic happening in the sky. And we built this series through that.

“Bentley fell in love with the process and what we were doing. And then he started recording thoughts and ideas, while I was working on what I was doing at the same time.”

Was it part of the interest for you to make the film to understand the current Australian climate?

“Absolutely. It’s a whole lot of things. I’ve spent the last 25 years working on very deep, multi-year landscape projects, weeks and weeks alone in the bush at a time. And really stripping down the landscape of its bare elements and then make a series of them. So, I made a film called Salt in 2009 and it was about living in the middle of Lake Eyre for five weeks straight for a decade. Flambé talks about the earth itself, what it means and how humans interact with it. The environment or ecological issues and things like that are absolutely front and center, but they’re only part of it.

“I’ve worked and listened to a lot of friends who work on environmental river flows, water flows, that sort of thing. I was particularly interested in what is happening in lower Darling due to corruption of water flows, water theft, over-allocation of water. So I went to the local community, they killed these fish, where 2 million Murray Cods were found dead in the Darling. I saw this lake system emblematic of a lot of environmental issues that were happening, but also, this emblematic region of indigenous dispossession, of big business encroaching on small farms and communities. He just felt that Menindee was a great place to start. I approached the local community and offered to light one of the trees, not as a protest, but as a beacon, and I said, “Look, if you let me do this for my art project, I ‘will encourage the community to use imagery to draw attention to these issues’.

“But once we made one, I realized we were going to come across something bigger. Then we started to work more and more. We started working in the river systems below Menindee that were flowing for the first time in a decade, and there are lakes and rivers and things there, and then we headed out to the area around the lake Eyre and continued the work in the rivers up there that flowed that haven’t flowed for many, many years.

“The Australian landscape is in an unusual state at the moment. The country is green from coast to coast. The sand dunes, the lake, the red desert are all covered in green bushes at the moment. But the lakes and the rivers which are normally just landmarks on a map are also all full and full of life”.

Did you enjoy working with Bentley Dean and Tania Nehme?

“Absolutely. They are completely passionate people. It’s a complete love project for everyone involved. Very little money has changed hands. And I think we’re all just doing it for the love of it. art and the joy of seeing the system we know too. We all work in film and photography as professional editors, shooters, whatever. We’re all used to working within those constraints. And that was just “an opportunity that presented itself to work completely outside the system. And we all loved it and ran with it.”

What has been the biggest challenge?

“Cutting the film from Bentley’s originally scheduled time to 29 minutes.

“What Bentley and Tanya brought to the whole process was this ability to work at the pace of the landscape. It’s very, very difficult to hold your own and keep an audience interested. And that’s what that they did so well at that job I think working outside of the system allowed them to experience a rhythm and a sense of time that I think your average commissioning editor for a streaming service wouldn’t allow just not.

“And for me, as a landscape artist, it’s a matter of time slowing down. So what Bentley did was just tap right into that and go, ‘This is what we’re doing, this is what the movie is going to be like.’

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KSRelief distributes 370 winter bags to Pakistanis https://russellchatham.com/ksrelief-distributes-370-winter-bags-to-pakistanis/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 05:30:40 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/ksrelief-distributes-370-winter-bags-to-pakistanis/ RIYADH: Visitors to Wadi Hanifa, a vast valley in Riyadh lined with palm trees and streams, were greeted last weekend by a number of new large-scale contemporary public artworks created by Saudi and international artists . The installations are part of Noor Riyadh, an annual festival of light and art featuring more than 190 works […]]]>

RIYADH: Visitors to Wadi Hanifa, a vast valley in Riyadh lined with palm trees and streams, were greeted last weekend by a number of new large-scale contemporary public artworks created by Saudi and international artists .

The installations are part of Noor Riyadh, an annual festival of light and art featuring more than 190 works by approximately 130 Saudi and international artists from more than 40 countries. They are on display until November 19 in 40 locations across five main centers in Riyadh.

Children played football in front of ‘A Thousand Galaxies of Light’, a work by Puerto Rican-American artist Gisela Colon, which consists of an elliptical configuration of 100 vertical tubes of white light, each measuring 2.5 meters in height. high.

Children play in front of “A Thousand Galaxies of Light,” a work by Puerto Rican-American artist Gisela Colon, which consists of an elliptical configuration of 100 vertical tubes of white light, each 2.5 meters high. (Provided)

Colon, who also participated in the first edition of Desert X AlUla in 2020, said he was inspired by physics, cosmology and biology for this work, which imagines a forest of mythical horizons pointing metaphorically to a vibrant future, in line with Noor Riyad’s theme this year: “We dream of new horizons”.

On a nearby main thoroughfare, passers-by can see choreographer, dancer and artist Sarah Brahim’s installation, “De Anima,” with images projected under a bridge in the Wadi Hanifa wetlands.

“In this work, I was inspired by the way light enters through the body and exits in different ways,” Brahim told Arab News.

Ahaad Alamoudi’s work “Ghosts of Today and Tomorrow” is a performative installation that considers the role of light as a natural vector of information. It is made up of two former dovecotes, alluding to the historic use of pigeons as carriers of messages. (Provided)

“The work re-theorizes Aristotle’s text ‘De Anima’ and examines five different souls at five different times of the day, about how light animates the soul and the essence of life. Each person represents a physical and metaphorical type of light.

Brahim also emphasizes the use of time in his piece. Visitors to the installation are offered headphones through which they can listen to a soundtrack while viewing the images.

Another work exhibited in Wadi Hanifah is “Ghosts of Today and Tomorrow” by Saudi multimedia artist Ahaad Alamoudi, a performative installation that considers the role of light as a natural carrier of information. It is made up of two old dovecotes, alluding to the historic use of pigeons as carriers of messages, and a singer who performs a mawwal, a type of traditional Arabic song, while light shines through the openings in each tower .

Noor Riyadh is the first program implemented under the auspices of Riyadh Art. (Provided)

“The meaning of light is very accessible and appropriate for a city like Riyadh,” Miguel Blanco-Carrasco, executive director of Noor Riyadh, told Arab News. “The city comes alive after sunset because of Riyadh’s temperature and geography.”

In the evenings, many residents often go out for dinner or spend time in the city’s many parks. As a result, the festival was designed to install the art in some of the places in Riyadh where people were most likely to see it.

“Light is a medium accessible to everyone, regardless of their level of education, class or understanding of contemporary art,” Blanco-Carrasco said. “We want to bring art everywhere and we want to make it accessible to everyone.”

On a nearby main thoroughfare, passers-by can see choreographer, dancer and artist Sarah Brahim’s installation, “De Anima,” with images projected under a bridge in the Wadi Hanifa wetlands. (Provided)

Another Noor Riyadh highlight is “I See You Brightest in the Dark” by Saudi artist Muhannad Shono, which is featured at Bayt Al-Malaz.

“God willing, everything will be resolved,” by Saudi-Palestinian artist Ayman Yossri Daydban, uses carefully chosen stills from captioned films to create a work that paints Arabic script with light.

It is inspired by the commonly used Arabic phrase, ‘Inshallah’ which means ‘God willing’, which is rendered in large neon white text on the structure of the abandoned hospital in Irqah. It overlooks the abandoned cityscape that surrounds it, breathing new life into a space now largely devoid of human presence.

Noor Riyadh is the first program implemented under the auspices of Riyadh Art. (Provided)

“Carving the Future”, by Saudi artist Obaid Al-Safi, is presented in a desert landscape. With the work, the artist questions the relationship between the desert and the civilization that emerged from it, questioning the links between the ancient past of the Kingdom and its more recent transformations.

Saudi artist Ayman Zedani’s moving “Between Biotic and Bionic” in Riyadh’s Olaya neighborhood explores how in cities across the Gulf region nature is increasingly experienced as simulacra or imitations, like man-made rainforests or neon jungles, blurring the distinction. between the real and the artificial.

It brings together, in Zedani’s signature style, elements of light, sound, sculpture, and nature in welded metal structures that are covered with resurrection plants, which are types of plants that can survive periods of extreme dehydration, in a nod to the desert. landscape and the effects of climate change.

A textual work by Joel Andrianomearisoa, Malagasy artist, is essential. Set in the King Abdullah financial district and created using neon and metal, it relays the message “On a Never-Ending Horizon, a Future Nostalgia to Keep the Present Alive”, which is about love, hopes and dreams for the future.

Noor Riyadh is the first program implemented under the auspices of Riyadh Art, the Kingdom’s first public art initiative. It aims to transform the city into a “gallery without walls”, to beautify it and to strengthen the creative spirit of the population.

One of its goals, Blanco-Carrasco said, is to “remove any preconceptions of contemporary art as accessible only to elites; we want to make it accessible to everyone in Riyadh. Noor Riyadh is their party.

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Method in the madness at ‘Fear to Tread’ https://russellchatham.com/method-in-the-madness-at-fear-to-tread/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 17:52:10 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/method-in-the-madness-at-fear-to-tread/ “Fear to Tread”, the inaugural exhibition of Roger That! Gallery + Studios at Roger Williams University, is a somewhat harsh viewing experience that nevertheless manages to be engaging, curious, and ultimately rewarding. The gallery is housed in an unassuming building a few blocks from downtown Bristol, Rhode Island. On the evening of the opening, in […]]]>

“Fear to Tread”, the inaugural exhibition of Roger That! Gallery + Studios at Roger Williams University, is a somewhat harsh viewing experience that nevertheless manages to be engaging, curious, and ultimately rewarding.

The gallery is housed in an unassuming building a few blocks from downtown Bristol, Rhode Island. On the evening of the opening, in order to view the exhibition, visitors passed through a large hall that serves as a common studio space for Roger Williams’ art students, many of whom were on hand to enjoy the festivities and display some of their own works.

Curator Alexander Castro mixes the work of regional contemporary visual artists with initially head-scratching choices including an inkjet reproduction of an early 20th-century entrance photograph depicting the entrance to Ferrycliffe Farm, the site on which RWU now exists, credited to Herbert Marshall Howe (possibly), a 1991 naïve landscape painting by an unknown artist, and an advertisement for Osteo Bi Flex, originally printed in a 2003 issue of Ladies ‘ Home Journal.

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Unparalleled collection of 1980s street art and graffiti celebrating Loisaida’s singular scene featured at Christie’s https://russellchatham.com/unparalleled-collection-of-1980s-street-art-and-graffiti-celebrating-loisaidas-singular-scene-featured-at-christies/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 21:35:34 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/unparalleled-collection-of-1980s-street-art-and-graffiti-celebrating-loisaidas-singular-scene-featured-at-christies/ DAVID WOJNAROWICZ ‘History Keeps Me Awake at Night (for Rilo Chmielorz)’ (1986) signed, inscribed, … [+] titled and dated ‘HISTORY KEEPS ME AWAKE AT NIGHT DAVID WOJNAROWICZ 1986 KÖLN’ (on verso) acrylic, spray paint and collage of paper printed on panel 67 x 78 1/2 in. (170.2 x 199.4 cm.) Christie’s A map of the […]]]>

A map of the world covers a sleeping man as a hulking comic book villain hovers above his bed and stares at the barrel of a gun aimed directly at the viewer. The two men are rendered in thick black lines, the shape of the would-be aggressor imposed on the background where the map projected onto the sleeper is obscured by a frenzy of images. A green-fleshed alien stumbles after being impaled by a bullet to the skull, while a Doric column collapses and crushes an ancient equestrian statue. Images of US currency, bureaucracy, and possibly chemical warfare are overlaid on the map.

The frenetic scene amplifies the precariousness of the sleeping man, threatened by multiple nightmarish government-controlled forces.

The story keeps me up at night (for Rilo Chmielorz), a deeply symbolic and haunting collage of acrylic, spray paint and panel-printed paper by David Wojnarowicz, is the visceral culmination of the incomparable Loisaida: 1980s Graffiti And Street Art From The John P. Axelrod Collection. The first batch of 31 rare and masterful works covering a wide range of techniques and styles classified as graffiti and street art are expected to fetch between $800,000 and $1.2 million when auctioned at Christie’s Post sale -War & Contemporary Art Day on November 18. The collection will be presented to the public on Saturday at the flagship of Christie’s Rockefeller Center.

“This painting in particular captures all the patterns. This image deals with violence and deals with stories dealing with America,” Michael Baptist, Christie’s Postwar and Contemporary Art Department First Opening Scholar and Manager, said in a Zoom interview. “It comes at a time when he’s kind of really hit his technical stride, and he’s doing super complex multi-media works. He developed this technique in a very short time and was at his peak… when he made this picture ( in) 1986.”

Wojnarowicz in the mid-1980s began to incorporate his array of signs and symbols into complex compositions that serve as metaphors for a society that undermines the value of marginalized people. Some 26 years after his death from AIDS, in 2018 the Whitney Museum of American Art celebrated the career of the painter, photographer, writer, filmmaker, performance artist, musician, and AIDS activist who fought tirelessly for people living on the periphery, giving a voice to others. Name the exhibition Whitney The story keeps me up at night highlighted the lasting impact of Wojnarowicz’s work as we continue to struggle against violence and oppression through systems of power and control. We have overcome the AIDS crisis, but we are far from fostering a safe and egalitarian society outside of heteronormative discourse.

Axelrod’s visionary collection amplifies the impact and significance on art history of the pioneering ferocity of artists working on New York’s Loisaida, a term derived from the Nuyorican pronunciation of the Lower East Side, between 1980 and around 1985. Keith Haring is pictured alongside Futura, Rammelzee, CRASH, DAZE, Dondi, Lee Quinones, Lady Pink, A-One and other artists who make up an art scene that forever transformed the landscape of downtown Manhattan and the global art world.

The downtown Manhattan art scene of the early 1980s marked a seismic shift that continues to reinform our collective understanding of contemporary art and culture. Some four decades later, the still gritty Lower East Side is thriving as a hotbed of contemporary art galleries on nearly every block.

“I think John’s vision is to collect and, through collecting, to tell a story that has never been told before,” Baptist said. “When I looked at the collection as a whole, I really felt it represented those five years on the Lower East Side, and that’s a rare thing to achieve through a collection. … I think John, at some point recognized that something special had happened at that time, at that place, with those artists, and he saw an opportunity to build a collection around that and the story.

Exhibited only once in the year of its creation, Untitled (1980) features FUTURA 2000’s abstract approach to graffiti. Now known simply as Futura, artist born Leonard Hilton McGurr in 1955, exhibited in the early 1980s with Patti Astor at Fun Gallery alongside by Haring, Basquiat, Richard Hambleton and Kenny Scharf, and his work remains more relevant than ever. The monumental spray enamel on seminal and rare plywood, which belonged only to Axelrod, is expected to sell for between $70,000 and $100,000.

“The takeaways from this piece are its size (48 by 96 inches), its date, 1980, being very early for it, and Futura being sort of one of the biggest names in the scene,” Baptist said. . “From an auction perspective, (he has) the most international collector base. I know there are going to be a lot of people in Europe, especially in France, where he has a big community of collectors, who are going to be interested in this and that’s why we put it as the first batch of the collection .

Highlighting the seriousness of community in the early 1980s on the LES and East Village art scene, George Condo’s Def Jammy (1984) has special value because it was given to his dear friend Haring.

“All of the fun and incredibly inspiring times spent with Keith will always live deep in my heart. He was always my best friend. ‘Def Jammy’ was how graffiti artists referred to great painting at the time and so I made this coin to commemorate this phrase used by Toxic, A-One and Rammellzee,” Condo said.

A Polaroid shot by Scott Schedivy and held in the archives of the Keith Haring Foundation shows the beloved work hanging on the wall of Haring’s studio. Def Jammy, which is imbued with immeasurable personal and emotional value, is expected to sell for between $80,000 and $120,000.

“Keith hung it in his studio on Broadway forever! Over the years we gave each other art for free out of friendship and sometimes Keith would even buy one to help me out. Keith came in early 1989 in Paris as he finished some work and we were having dinner every night,” Condo said. “I begged him not to go back to New York because I was afraid I would never see him again. . And that was the last time I did. We always laughed even when he was very sick and often talked about art and mortality.”

One of the two Basquiats in the collection, Untitled (1982), which was exhibited only once in 2014, brings us back to Wojnarowicz’s intensity. Steep lines of red, black and burnt ocher depicting recurring motifs (sacred heart, crown) amplify Basquiat’s textual momentum and racist language subversion. The oil-on-paper stick depicting “TAR TOWN,” “POLLO FRITO,” and “NEW SOAP” is expected to fetch between $800,000 and $1.2 million. A recurring theme with Basquiat, he used various references to tar to counter racial injustices in the world of art and culture in general. The Spanish term for fried chicken is an attack on stereotypes that black people enjoy fried junk food, and a linguistic nod to his Puerto Rican and LES ancestry. The “new soap” has many connotations, including efforts to whitewash or erase black culture.

There is a simplicity to this work, with Basquiat using multiple motifs and texts rather than figures to convey racial and social injustice. Complexity erupts from the mixture of self-referential motifs and text intertwining with symbols and themes that continue to provoke viewers and behave like timeless social critique.

“Some people have even pointed the finger at (the broken glass) referring to Kristallnacht. I don’t know if that’s exaggerated or not, but all history aside, broken glass is something we come across all time on the street, and that’s part of city life,” Baptist said. “I think he’s not always looking, when he’s composing works like this, to make a definitive statement, but rather to put together a number of patterns to make a picture that other artists might paint with figures, but in this case he uses text and symbols.

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Kochi artist’s watercolors capture beauty of landscape in flowing colors in exhibition at Durbar Hall Art Gallery https://russellchatham.com/kochi-artists-watercolors-capture-beauty-of-landscape-in-flowing-colors-in-exhibition-at-durbar-hall-art-gallery/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 07:07:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/kochi-artists-watercolors-capture-beauty-of-landscape-in-flowing-colors-in-exhibition-at-durbar-hall-art-gallery/ Sunil Linus De’s 11th solo exhibition of watercolors titled Survival of the Fittest, at Durbar Hall Art Gallery, Kochi, explores the theme Sunil Linus De’s 11th solo exhibition of watercolors titled Survival of the Fittest, at Durbar Hall Art Gallery, Kochi, explores the theme Kochi-based artist Sunil Linus De explores the complex relationship between man […]]]>

Sunil Linus De’s 11th solo exhibition of watercolors titled Survival of the Fittest, at Durbar Hall Art Gallery, Kochi, explores the theme

Sunil Linus De’s 11th solo exhibition of watercolors titled Survival of the Fittest, at Durbar Hall Art Gallery, Kochi, explores the theme

Kochi-based artist Sunil Linus De explores the complex relationship between man and nature in his art exhibition Survival of the Fittest taking place at Durbar Hall Art Gallery. About 80 paintings by the artist are exhibited.

The artist captures the beauty of the mundane in richly detailed watercolors. Watercolor is a difficult medium to work with because it does not allow you to rework or paint the space. The artist’s years of experience show in his effortless manipulation of the medium, the works convey the lightness and transparency typical of watercolours.

Sunil Linus From

Sunil Linus From | Photo credit: SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT

The typical Kerala sights – boats on the backwaters, people on the streets and in the countryside – are complemented by works of animals in the forests such as elephants, deer and others. The landscapes are striking, “A landscape should be more than a pretty picture, it should make the viewer want to go to that place, to sit in the shade of that tree…it should attract the viewer. As an artist, you should be able to give the person looking at the painting a ‘feel’ of the landscape.” Although he also works in other mediums, watercolor is his favourite, he admits. he.

“It’s not an easy medium to handle, it takes years of experience to be able to maintain its transparency. For the past 30 years as an artist I have experimented with watercolors to get the results I get.

The dimensions of the works are between 11 x 15 inches and 30 x 20 inches; they are on sale with prices starting at ₹10000-2 lakh. The exhibition, which is his 11th, was to be held in 2020.

Ends November 6.

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Can artists save the Salton Sea? https://russellchatham.com/can-artists-save-the-salton-sea/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 10:30:54 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/can-artists-save-the-salton-sea/ It was the last day of summer as I raced down California State Route 111 toward the Salton Sea. The area had withstood a dry, scorching summer, with one notable exception: the visitation of Hurricane Kay. It made landfall as a tropical storm in Baja California, moved north and brought heavy rain, triggering flash flooding […]]]>

It was the last day of summer as I raced down California State Route 111 toward the Salton Sea. The area had withstood a dry, scorching summer, with one notable exception: the visitation of Hurricane Kay. It made landfall as a tropical storm in Baja California, moved north and brought heavy rain, triggering flash flooding across southern California. The storm damaged roads and uprooted trees. However, at the time of my visit two weeks later, there were little to no signs of this disaster. The desert is a place that recovers quickly, but the same cannot be said for the Salton Sea.

“The sea”, as many locals call it, has been filled and depleted with water for thousands of years. In 1905, after a particularly wet spring, it overflowed the banks of the Colorado River. In the 1950s and 1960s, resorts emerged and attracted crowds of vacationing families and celebrities. At the center of this tourist boom was Bombay Beach, a community on the eastern shore, now a shadow of its former self. But locals and tourists still congregate at the neighborhood watering hole, the Ski Inn.

An RV home in the mostly off-grid community of Slab City.

(Simon J. Lau)

When I arrived at the Ski Inn, Sonia Herbert, a great lady, greeted me warmly from the bar. A member of this community since 1974, she bought the place in 2018.

Until the 1970s, crowds came on weekends and holidays to boat, fish and swim. Others came to enjoy the desert. The sea was also an important stopover for migratory bird species. “We used to have thousands of white pelicans coming every year,” Herbert said. “When they started showing up, we knew summer was over.”

A white single-engine airplane sits nose down, left, and a sculpture made of scrap metal.

“Lost Cargo,” left, by Phillip Barr and TJ Lewis and “Helios” by Sean Guerrero are installations at the entrance to East Jesus.

(Simon J. Lau)

But soon after Herbert’s arrival, the fortunes of the sea were reversed, and so were the fortunes of those who depended on it. At times, hurricanes, tropical storms and agricultural runoff have inundated the basin, overwhelming seaside communities. But, more recently, water evaporation has created high concentrations of toxic particles, making the sea unsafe bathing and killing many fish and migrating birds. This gradual collapse has continued over the past decade. Yet the sea has seen something of a revival, thanks in part to the growth of artist communities.

A tree with shoes hanging from its branches.  Hundreds of other shoes are on the floor below.
The shoe tree of Slab City.

(Simon J. Lau)

The area has been home to bohemian types for decades. Drive 35 km southeast of Bombay Beach and you will find Slab City, formerly a US Marine Corps training center during World War II. After its decommissioning and demolition of the buildings in 1956, the remaining concrete slabs inspired its current name. It was first resettled by a small community of Mavericks. As this community grew, so did the diversity of its residents. Artists in particular have reshaped the landscape, especially through their art installations.

A small, colorful hill adorned with religious phrases and a crucifix affixed to its top.
Salvation Mountain, Leonard Knight’s artistic expression of God’s love.

(Simon J. Lau)

The best known of these installations is that of Leonard Knight Salvation Mountain, a five-story adobe-covered mound painted with messages of God’s love. This project lasted 28 years, during which it attracted tens of thousands of visitors. In 2002, Salvation Mountain was entered into the Congressional Record like a national treasure. Knight died in 2014, and a nonprofit organization, Salvation Mountain Inc., took on the task of preserving the mountain and his work.

A decorated hill with a barrel in the foreground that has been painted with the word,

A hot air balloon burner and the outline of a hot air balloon in the background at Salvation Mountain.

(Simon J. Lau)

A Salvation Mountain keeper is Ron, a Detroit native. Initially, he volunteered and was given basic duties. When he demonstrated a high level of skill in working with clay and paint, honed by his many years in construction, the trustees of the nonprofit took notice and directed him to more difficult missions. That was years ago, and Ron has since devoted his time to maintaining this monument. He says he loves it here, spreading the message of love through art in an unforgiving landscape.

A man in a yellow shirt and blue shorts with his hands on his hips stands in front of a decorated hill
Ron, caretaker at Salvation Mountain.

(Simon J. Lau)

Down the street from Salvation Mountain is East Jesus, the brainchild of Charlie Russell. In 2007 Russell quit his job, moved to Slab City and carved out that space for himself and other artists. Art Garden sits in the heart of East Jesus, originally displaying works of art that Russell brought with him or that he created. It has since expanded to include contributions from artists in the community, such as “Television Shall Not Be Revolutionized”. This installation by Flip Cassidy is a commentary on the impact of mass media, both sacred and secular, on human lives.

A wall of televisions, with white screens bearing messages in red letters, in an outdoor setting
“Television will not be revolutionized”, by Flip Cassidy, in East Jesus.

(Simon J. Lau)

After Russell’s death in 2011, the Chasterus Foundation, a non-profit organization, was established to continue its mission of providing “refuge for artists, musicians, survivors, writers, scientists, laypeople, and other wandering geniuses”.

Other artist enclaves, still very recent, have formed elsewhere around the Salton Sea. Some have set up local arts events, including the Bombay Beach Biennial. Exhibits such as the “Bombay Beach Drive-In”, created by Stefan Ashkenazy and Sean Dale Taylor for the 2018 Biennale, have become permanent installations.

A sign that reads

“Bombay Beach Drive-In”, created by Stefan Ashkenazy and Sean Dale Taylor for the 2018 Biennale, is now a permanent installation.

(Simon J. Lau)

Herbert says what she appreciates most about the sea is “the serenity, the openness. There are so many people, traffic and noise in the city. Here you can unpack. For artists, this place offers a space of love, art and introspection.

An empty picnic table, on the left, with a view of the sea and the mountains in the distance
The Salton Sea from Salt Creek Beach.

(Simon J. Lau)

Simon J. Lau, writer and photographer, is the creator of Formerly Print, a publication focused on sharing portraits of people and their stories.

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9 Autumn Artworks to Add Atmosphere to Your Gloucestershire Home https://russellchatham.com/9-autumn-artworks-to-add-atmosphere-to-your-gloucestershire-home/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 10:52:38 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/9-autumn-artworks-to-add-atmosphere-to-your-gloucestershire-home/ From dreamy watercolors to striking oil paintings, mixed media, ceramics and glassware, Cheltenham’s Paragon Gallery has a range of artwork to spruce up your home this fall. Featuring artists from across the UK, as well as those based in and inspired by Gloucestershire, SoGlos highlights nine new pieces currently on display – and for sale […]]]>

From dreamy watercolors to striking oil paintings, mixed media, ceramics and glassware, Cheltenham’s Paragon Gallery has a range of artwork to spruce up your home this fall.

Featuring artists from across the UK, as well as those based in and inspired by Gloucestershire, SoGlos highlights nine new pieces currently on display – and for sale – at Paragon.

Cheap Artworks from Paragon Gallery

Ceramic shapes by Camilla Ward

Whether painting or clay, surface and line are fundamental in Camilla Ward’s work. The most important consideration is the effect of color on a room’s space, light, and mood. Real or imagined experiences from the past and present inform the development of each work, with drawings, notes and photos evolving in the studio into mostly abstract compositions that sometimes border on landscapes.

Ward builds up the surface, laying down color and texture, sometimes applying clay, retouching, then repainting, reworking, scraping and marking to create his unique works.

To learn more about Camilla Ward, visit paragongallery.co.uk.

Come Come Dark Winds by Ashar

Ashar works primarily in oil on wood panel, creating abstract works with the aim of moving the viewer. She captures a painterly response to the spirit of a landscape rather than just a visual impression, creating a work that has the ability to be vividly felt.

Born in Surrey in 1942, Ashar now lives and works on the Somerset Levels, which are her great inspiration. His winter months were spent in the moors sketching and soaking up the essence of the landscape. She then uses these sketches to reconnect with her feelings for a location when she returns to the studio.

To learn more about Ashar, visit paragongallery.co.uk.

Friends by Michele Lehman

Lehman was born in Switzerland but moved to Mijas in southern Spain over 30 years ago. Once there, she opened an art gallery as an outlet for local artists. Although not an artist herself, she started drawing to pass the time, starting with a sketch of an old woman in black who walked past the gallery every day. She moved too fast to draw, so the image captured her from behind – and her style was born.

Lehman’s numbers are nostalgic; they turn away from you, point at something outside your field of vision, or rush towards an unknown destination. There’s always something they don’t tell you, causing the viewer to instinctively start making up their own story.

To learn more about Michele Lehman, visit paragongallery.co.uk.

Mid-priced artwork from the Paragon Gallery

Tide Race by Rod Nelson

Nelson is a self-taught engraver based in Gloucestershire, where he works as a full-time artist. Specializing in woodcuts, he has a unique approach, using tools and techniques he has spent 30 years developing. He has exhibited extensively with regular shows across the UK and Germany and has had works selected for the International Print Center of New York’s Winter Exhibition.

Nelson teaches the technique of wood engraving at the famous West Dean College of Arts and Crafts in Sussex. He also teaches at RWA, Germany, Holland, and leads workshops from his home.

To learn more about Rod Nelson, visit paragongallery.co.uk.

Cool, White Spring by Bruce McLean

One of the major figures in contemporary British art, McLean’s work is in a constant state of movement and invention. Since the late 1960s his range of media has included painting, printmaking, sculpture, film, photography, drawing and live work.

Humor, skepticism and wit are always at the center. He seeks to challenge the concept of sculpture and art by creating works that challenge establishment thinking, materials and methods of display. A must for any contemporary art collector.

To learn more about Bruce McLean, visit paragongallery.co.uk.

Through Cannop by Doug Eaton

Eaton’s style is unmistakable with a bright and bold painterly quality. Her inspiration comes from her beautiful surroundings in the Forest of Dean. He tries to provide the viewer with minimal information to suggest the subject, leaving the rest to the imagination.

Eaton grew up in Coleford in the Forest of Dean. After school he went on to study at the Stroud School of Art and later at Cheltenham College of Art. He started painting full time in 1977 but worked in the graphic industry until 2001.

To learn more about Doug Eaton, visit paragongallery.co.uk.

High-priced artwork from the Paragon Gallery

Night Flourish by Jerry Browning

Browning was born in Dorset in 1954. A student at the art colleges of Exeter and Reading, he painted under the tutelage of Sir Terry Frost and Patrick Heron. He worked alongside acclaimed painters Patrick Proctor, Albert Irvin, Adrian Heath and Gillian Ayres.

He immersed himself in American Abstract Expressionism and the work of Mark Rothko, Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline and Robert Montgomery. Back in the UK, he joined the famous British artists’ colony of St Ives, where he continued to explore the growing American influence and developed his own unique style.

To learn more about Jerry Browning, visit paragongallery.co.uk.

Drifting Confetti by Melanie Cormack-Hicks

Cormack-Hicks graduated in fine art in the late 1990s in Cheltenham. She believes the inherent relationship we all have with the landscape allows her paintings to summon strong emotions.

She said: “Each painting has its own story, but it is not meant to tell you my story. I believe that once a painting is finished, it no longer belongs to me, that I have to take a step back to allow the viewer to enter the painting and find their own narrative. I believe this is why my paintings evoke such deep memories and feelings in their owners.

To know more about Melanie Cormack-Hicksvisit paragongallery.co.uk.

Polar Shift by Adam Binder

Binder lives and works in the Cotswolds, where the diverse environment provides an endless source of inspiration.

He said: “Nature is a wonder and a joy to observe and it is through my sculpture that I strive to connect more with wildlife and capture the character of my subject. As I sculpt, I feel like I am engaging with the spirit of the animal, sensing its subtle movement and suggestion of body language. For me, nature and sculpture are the perfect marriage. I see repetitions in form, line, mass and detail throughout the natural world, sculpted over time but in perfect harmony. Nature is my passion and my constant distraction”.

To learn more about Adam Binder, visit paragongallery.co.uk.

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Award-winning country band Old Dominion booked for Santander Arena show [Spotlight] https://russellchatham.com/award-winning-country-band-old-dominion-booked-for-santander-arena-show-spotlight/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 16:24:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/award-winning-country-band-old-dominion-booked-for-santander-arena-show-spotlight/ Award-winning country band Old Dominion booked for Santander Arena show [Spotlight]October 23—Current CMA Award Vocal Group of the Year and Album of the Year nominees Old Dominion perform their No Bad Vibes Tour at Santander Arena, Reading on April 13. Presale is underway and tickets will go on sale to the public on Friday at 10 a.m. at ticketmaster.com. The Old Dominion headlining tour announcement […]]]> Award-winning country band Old Dominion booked for Santander Arena show [Spotlight]

October 23—Current CMA Award Vocal Group of the Year and Album of the Year nominees Old Dominion perform their No Bad Vibes Tour at Santander Arena, Reading on April 13. Presale is underway and tickets will go on sale to the public on Friday at 10 a.m. at ticketmaster.com.

The Old Dominion headlining tour announcement follows a successful run on Kenny Chesney’s 2022 Here and Now Tour, which included 23 stadium shows this summer.

Old Dominion wrote and recorded new music which they teased on their TikTok page. Their latest album, “Time, Tequila and Therapy”, was released in 2021 and debuted in the Top 5 on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart and was nominated for Album of the Year at this year’s CMA Awards. .

Old Dominion have become one of Nashville’s most successful post-country bands, fusing smart lyrics with an infectious sound. Since breaking up in 2014, the group has had eight No. 1 singles on country radio, over a billion on-demand streams, multiple platinum and gold single certifications, and headlining arenas and amphitheaters around the world. whole world. The group won their fifth consecutive Group of the Year at this year’s 56th ACM Awards and also won their fourth consecutive Vocal Group of the Year at the 2021 CMA Awards.

Tickets also went on sale for R&B Sunday Funday with SWV, Dru Hill and 112 on February 26 at Santander Arena, comedian Lewis Black on March 11 at Santander Performing Arts Center and Yes Epics & Classics with Jon Anderson and the Bands. Geeks on April 23 at the Santander Performing Arts Center.

Art

‘Sisters’ Gallery Revisited’, an exhibition of artwork by Mary Stoudt, Jean Cocuzza, Sybil Thompson and Julia Cocuzza, will run from Saturday to 28 November at the Schmidt Gallery at GoggleWorks Center for the Arts, Reading. A reception is scheduled for November 11.

The Sisters’ Gallery was founded in 1994 by Sisters Mary Stoudt and Jean Cocuzza and operated first in Sinking Spring and then in the Lancaster County village of Stoudtburg until 2010. This exhibit features the sisters’ works and their daughters, Sybil Thompson and Julia Cocuzza.

During the Sisters’ Gallery years, GoggleWorks alumnus Mary Stoudt created art quilts of great depth and creativity and craftsmanship, winning awards at the “Art of the State” in Harrisburg. Her sister, Jean Cocuzza, continued to paint in oils, watercolors and pastels, often inspired by gallery shows, such as “PA Dutch Postmodern”, “Celebrating Our City” and “Mothers Expressions”.

The gallery featured the colorful and whimsical work of Sybil Thompson, Mary’s daughter and currently artist at GoggleWorks studio. Eventually, Julia Cocuzza, Jean’s daughter, exhibited her oil paintings as she pursued her art studies at Syracuse University and Brooklyn College and developed her career as an art teacher. and mural artist in New York.

“Sisters’ Gallery Revisited” will also include new pieces by Jean, Sybil and Julia.

—-Studio B, Boyertown, will present “Michelle Neifert and Mimi Conrey”, an exhibition of two women showcasing the work of artists who paint flowers, with a vernissage on Friday from 5-7 p.m. A virtual visit will take place between 6 and 7 on Facebook LIVE and will be archived as a Facebook event and on YouTube after opening. Amy Muzopappa of Muzo Media Productions hosts the art tour. The exhibition will continue until November 27.

Neifert has described her work as an exploration, an inner journey in search of knowledge of our interconnectedness, unity and connection at the level of feelings. She explains that her work is interactive – an emotional conversation between the viewer and the color and form of art. In her abstract work, shapes and forms are usually created by herself, often resembling landscape or human form.

Conrey’s work showcases his love of color and portends his future to “relax” towards abstract expressions in his work and life in general. The love of his family, of God, of his dogs and of those whose life is centered on the family inspires his active life and his artistic vision. Her study of Monet at his iconic lake in France inspires her process, and her compassion for the misunderstood Van Gogh informs the intuitive approach she takes to her work.

Both artists will be featured on Jane Stahl’s “B Inspired” podcast in the coming weeks. Episodes can be listened to on a variety of podcast platforms: Spotify, Google, Apple, Castbox, for example.

—- The Yocum Institute for Art Education, Spring Township, will present an exhibition of works by the late Amos “Lemon” Burkhart beginning with an opening reception Saturday at 4 p.m. at its Holleran Gallery.

Mohnton’s Burkhart was a driven young artist who created hundreds of paintings, works on paper, digital art and animations between the ages of 15 and 19. As a junior at Gov. Mifflin High School, Burkhart won the annual Yocum High School Coggins Award. exposure. His work reflected his fascination with the human figure and incorporated “zoetropic” animated sequences.

He tragically died aged 19, drowned in an accident fueled by a combination of Xanax and alcohol, after a year of battling drug addiction, depression, anxiety and issues related to gender identity and gender. relationships. In addition to the art on display, there will be a number of interactive stations that will encourage attendees to process their emotions through thinking, writing, reading, speaking, playing games and making art.

The exhibition, which runs until November 26, is part of Yocum’s month-long “Stay Alive and Make Art” initiative, which offers art experiences to inspire teens. The gallery’s opening hours are Monday to Friday from 9am to 8pm and Saturday from 9am to 1pm

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The Legacy Series: Gifted & Black – Women In Music x YouTube Presents: Ebi Sampson | Media https://russellchatham.com/the-legacy-series-gifted-black-women-in-music-x-youtube-presents-ebi-sampson-media/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/the-legacy-series-gifted-black-women-in-music-x-youtube-presents-ebi-sampson-media/ Music Week is partnering with YouTube for the Women In Music Awards in October – Black History Month – with our second content offering and webinar event, The Legacy Series – Gifted And Black: Women In Music. Here, Music Week’s Colleen Harris meets inspirational August Agency founder Ebi Sampson. Ebi Sampson began her career in […]]]>

Music Week is partnering with YouTube for the Women In Music Awards in October – Black History Month – with our second content offering and webinar event, The Legacy Series – Gifted And Black: Women In Music. Here, Music Week’s Colleen Harris meets inspirational August Agency founder Ebi Sampson.

Ebi Sampson began her career in fashion PR, working on a wide range of fashion and music projects at the height of grime’s resurgence in London.

During this time, Sampson has been able to work on exciting collaborative projects like Skepta x Nasir Mazhar, A$AP Ferg x Astid Andersen as well as the very first Places + Faces exhibition.

After six years of immersing herself in fashion, Sampson decided to pursue something she’s always been passionate about. Not only did she co-manage her friends Youngs Teflon and K-Trap, but she also worked as an in-house PR at Atlantic Records working on campaigns such as Meek Mill, Kojo Funds, Janelle Monáe, Nipsey Hussle, Roddy Ricch, A Boogie Wit. Da Hoodie and more.

After two years at Atlantic, Sampson launched August alongside business partner James Cunningham with a vision to create an agency dedicated to artists who could inspire the cultural landscape and push the boundaries of music. At August, Sampson and Cunningham create bespoke PR campaigns for each artist to define and propel their stories and form a strong brand identity. Their clients include Burna Boy, Pa Salieu, Rico Nasty, Tems, Tiana Major9, Tion Wayne, Denzel Curry, Enny, BackRoad Gee, Earl Sweatshirt, Freddie Gibbs, Popcaan, Grace Carter and more.

Here, Sampson tells Colleen Harris about her journey so far, her personal growth, and the changing landscape of the press…

You started in fashion, but it was in music that you wanted to work. How did you manage this transition?
“It was really difficult because I didn’t really know anyone in music. I always knew I wanted to work in PR, and it took me working in fashion for six years and seeing the intersection of fashion and music working in this hybrid space. I knew a lot of artists, but I didn’t really know anyone behind the scenes. It was a weird transition, but I left to start managing Youngs Teflon and K-Trap. I did management for a few years and then got an in-house job at Atlantic as a public relations manager. I was hustling, it was a lot of learning. I didn’t really know what I was doing. I forced myself into that space and taught myself.

In the past, you’ve talked about the feeling of impostor syndrome. Can you talk about it and how you overcame it?
“I started working in public relations when I was 20 years old. I was the only black person in the [fashion] company I worked at and the only black person in the room most of the time. I was code switching and couldn’t really be myself because I didn’t feel like anyone really understood who I was. I struggled with that until I started seeing other people like Grace Ladoja and Sharmadean Reid – women who looked like me occupying similar spaces. It made me feel more comfortable. I had therapy to boost my confidence because I struggled with it for quite a long time. I was still able to do my job, it didn’t impact my job. But when I was leading, I was going to label meetings with a bunch of older white men, and I’m a black girl in her twenties who leads a drill artist. I know what I say and I know what I do, but for some reason this whole space was very intimidating. Things have changed a lot because now when you go to label meetings, the staff is diverse, there are women running labels now, there are black presidents. The space has changed enough for people to come after me. They won’t have to feel that way.

You went from working for a big label to setting up freelance. Did that feel like a leap of faith? What was required of you personally for this to happen?

“It really was a sink or swim moment. I had to believe in myself, even if I didn’t believe in it 110%. I was super nervous. I teamed up with someone else. When I ran K-Trap, I thought his publicist [James Cunningham] had a very good campaign and we got along very well. So when I left, I asked him to come with me and start this agency. He also took this leap of faith with me; We moved in together after knowing each other for less than a year. I clicked with him instantly and believed he was the right person to do this with. I have no regrets. »

You work with everyone from Tems to Burna Boy to Pa Salieu to Enny… How does it feel to be at the center of some of the biggest new hits in black music across the world ?
“It’s really exciting. I started working with most of these names very early, almost when they released their first singles. To be a fan, to listen to their music and to fall in love with them and of their artistry, and then talking to them, hearing their stories – that’s the only way for me to do really good work, if I really believe in who I’m working with. So to see them become such amazing artists that everyone fell in love with, especially someone like Tems, she accomplished so much more than I could have ever imagined. You can never predict where people are going to go, but it’s super exciting, you get yourself feel really proud.

There’s a lot more room for black faces on magazine covers now.

Ebi Sampson

Can you name some of the accomplishments you are most proud of so far?

“In our first year, we were nominated for a Music Week Award, which was really exciting considering we were up against some pretty huge agencies that had been around for years. It was for the Pa Salieu campaign. Watch his progress has been really exciting because when we first started working with him he never had to talk to reporters and explain his talent, why he does what he does. Watching him go from being really shy to be able to express that, it’s really rewarding – to see people live their dreams. Tems has been an incredible talent to watch. She’s at such an early stage in her career and everyone looks to her as the next one. Nigeria’s big name She has a sound that’s miles away from it all I’ve been working with Burna Boy for years, I’ve seen him go from a Grammy nomination to a Grammy win, with a number two album Plus, we had our first al bum number one with Nines. Tion Wayne, he just broke records; he had a number one single, his streams are insane. Just watch everyone.

What do you think is the key to a good press campaign today?
“It’s not a question of quantity, it’s a question of quality. We always hold back from opting for the greatest looks that position your artist as a trendsetter. It’s not about doing dozens of interviews but about doing one or two key things that can translate globally. The artist’s story is super important. I think that’s the job of a really good publicist – taking the key points of an artist’s journey, their process, their accomplishments, and putting them into a really concise and cohesive email. You always want to position your artists as the biggest and most exciting person around.

Tell us one thing that hasn’t changed about the job over the years, and one thing that has definitely changed?
“I think there’s a lot more room for black faces on magazine covers. When I started, there weren’t really any. I felt like if a magazine put a black woman on the cover, it probably wouldn’t put another black woman on the cover for a few months. But now it’s like, why not? You may feel more comfortable challenging posts. We deal with a lot of Nigerian artists, and there are spaces for them now, whereas before it didn’t feel like there were any on these mainstream titles. It is something that has changed for the better. What hasn’t changed? It’s still hard. You can’t predict someone’s journey, so to be able to convince a reporter that they’re the hottest, best talent is always a hustle. And unfortunately there are fewer magazines, after the pandemic, it doesn’t look the same as before. »

Finally, who are your closest confidants in the industry?
“One of the key people who helped me was Grace Ladoja. Before I officially launched my agency or told anyone about it, I talked to him about it. Right away, she’d be like, ‘Okay, cool. I want you to do this with me. It was as if she believed in it even before I had the chance to prove to myself that I could do this. She was an incredible champion. To this day, we still work together. Sheniece [Charway] on youtube he’s someone i can talk to about anything and everything all the time – on professional advice [and] friendship. She was a very special person to me. Rachel at Wired. I don’t even think I would have started August Agency without Rachel; she sat me down and said, ‘You can do it’. Jackie [Eyewe] at 0207 Def Jam. Twin to Def Jam. Jen Ivory at Warner. I have so many people who have stuck by me all this time.

Interview conducted by Colleen Harris

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Pink Art Train splashes across Aomori countryside https://russellchatham.com/pink-art-train-splashes-across-aomori-countryside/ Sun, 16 Oct 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/pink-art-train-splashes-across-aomori-countryside/ With its interior painted pink, the art train starts running in Hirosaki, Aomori Prefecture on September 14. (Shuichi Doi) HIROSAKI, Aomori Prefecture – Pretty as a picture, a train with its interior completely painted in shocking pink passes through a verdant pastoral landscape in the Tsugaru area, making a fashion statement of its own. The […]]]>


With its interior painted pink, the art train starts running in Hirosaki, Aomori Prefecture on September 14. (Shuichi Doi)

HIROSAKI, Aomori Prefecture – Pretty as a picture, a train with its interior completely painted in shocking pink passes through a verdant pastoral landscape in the Tsugaru area, making a fashion statement of its own.

The Art Train, which also sports pink lines on its body, makes up to nine round trips a day between Hirosaki and Kuroishi stations on Konan Railway Co’s Konan Line.

The flashy train serves as a “time machine” to help passengers reclaim their memories. Words such as “Where were you born?” and “What is your memorable place?” are written on the ground next to “November 1972”.

“There are spaces that no other train can offer,” said Takafumi Hara, who designed the train, at the unveiling ceremony on September 14. “I hope that each (passenger) will have access to their memories and remember precious things.”

Hara, a contemporary artist who is also a professor at Tohoku University of Art and Design, is known for incorporating pink into his works.

The prefectural government and other parties asked him to work for the project to encourage passengers to rediscover the charms of areas along the Konan Line.

He was inspired by things unique to Aomori Prefecture, such as growing apples and the gigantic “neputa” lantern floats.

The interior of the second car of the two-car train was designed by nine students from the information design course at Kuroishi High School run by the prefecture.

They interviewed local residents and drew inspiration from their stories to create a pink-themed train ad.

“We interviewed people from different generations, so we would be happy if (passengers) could feel the vibe of different eras,” said third-year student Konami Kimura, 17.

The Art Train is scheduled to run until November 13. Konan Railway said it would consider continuing the service after seeing how it is received by passengers.

A teacher and students from Kuroishi High School explain the advertisements they designed inside the second carriage of the art train in Hirosaki, Aomori Prefecture on September 14. (Shuichi Doi)

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