Landscape Artist – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 06:28:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://russellchatham.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2.png Landscape Artist – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ 32 32 Dutch winter landscapes based on Hendrick Avercamp by a Japanese artist https://russellchatham.com/dutch-winter-landscapes-based-on-hendrick-avercamp-by-a-japanese-artist/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 03:33:15 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/dutch-winter-landscapes-based-on-hendrick-avercamp-by-a-japanese-artist/ Dutch winter landscapes based on Hendrick Avercamp by a Japanese artist Lee Jay Walker Modern Tokyo Time Contemporary Japanese artist Sawako Utsumi loves Dutch art. This relates to the 16th and 17th centuries as this period was a golden age regarding the number of esteemed Dutch artists with unique styles. (all inspired by Dutch and […]]]>

Dutch winter landscapes based on Hendrick Avercamp by a Japanese artist

Lee Jay Walker

Modern Tokyo Time

Contemporary Japanese artist Sawako Utsumi loves Dutch art. This relates to the 16th and 17th centuries as this period was a golden age regarding the number of esteemed Dutch artists with unique styles. (all inspired by Dutch and Flemish Renaissance paintings). Consequently, Utsumi draws inspiration from and pays homage in his distinctive style to Hendrick Avercamp (1585-1634), Esaias van de Velde (1587-1630) and Aert van der Neer (1603-1677) in several works of art.

This article is based on Utsumi’s tribute to Avercamp. The National Museum says, “Hendrick Barentsz. Avercamp was a non-verbal (and probably deaf) artist known as “The Mute of Kampen” (from stom van Campen). He specialized in painting winter scenes. His paintings must have appealed to Dutch patriots because they represented the landscape and the life of the new Republic of the United Provinces of the Netherlands.

Utsumi adores many aspects of European and Japanese art. For example, the grace of rinpa art to the North of England artist LS Lowry. Landscapes and religious themes occur every time – regardless of Buddhism, Christianity or Shintoism.

The National Gallery of Art says, “In Amsterdam, Avercamp was influenced by the Flemish painters of Mannerist landscapes who lived in the city at the time, notably Gillis van Coninxloo III (Flemish, 1544 – 1607) and David Vinckboons (Dutch, 1576 – c.1632). Based on stylistic evidence, it is likely that one or both of these painters was Avercamp’s teacher, but no documentation of his apprenticeship exists.

utsumi (original from Avercamp above) provides his own color palette and thought patterns in his two artworks that pay homage to Avercamp. For example, in a work of art, she reduces the number of people to nine. This denotes the mathematical angle and infinity. Therefore, for Utsumi, the work of Avercamp – and others including Esaias van de Velde and Aert van der Neer – represents the “pass,” “gift,” and “future.”

Utsumi provides his northern Japanese artistic mindset and merges it with the rich cultural traits of Dutch art. From then on, a beautiful fusion of ideas emerges through the prism of his art.

https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/artists/hendrick-avercamp

https://www.nga.gov/collection/artist-info.129.html

https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/sawako-utsumi/shop – Sawako Utsumi (you can buy many products ranging from art to mugs, much more)

http://sawakoart.com – Sawako Utsumi and her website

ABOVE IS A NEW BOOK BASED ON THE ART OF SAWAKO UTSUMI

Book Review: Sawako Utsumi and her soul mate

European and Japanese art: Buddhism, Christianity, landscapes, rinpa, Shintoism, ukiyo-e and Dutch masters

http://www.lulu.com/shop/lee-jay-walker/sawako-utsumi-and-her-kindred-spirit/paperback/product-22830732.html – Please click on to order the book.

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Electronic music still beats in North Texas as artists create their own record labels https://russellchatham.com/electronic-music-still-beats-in-north-texas-as-artists-create-their-own-record-labels/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/electronic-music-still-beats-in-north-texas-as-artists-create-their-own-record-labels/ With the roller coaster of years of lockdowns and theatrical closures across North Texas, a handful of electronic producers and musicians from diverse backgrounds have retreated to their bedroom studios to build their discographies. Local independent artists continue to use Bandcamp to share releases, in many cases launching their own labels to bring their music […]]]>

With the roller coaster of years of lockdowns and theatrical closures across North Texas, a handful of electronic producers and musicians from diverse backgrounds have retreated to their bedroom studios to build their discographies. Local independent artists continue to use Bandcamp to share releases, in many cases launching their own labels to bring their music to a wider audience.

Here are the North Texas email numbers you should be looking at this year.


Kerim Bey /[S|3L]
Label: Time loop

With releases on Science Cult and his own label, Temporal Loop, Kerim Bey has been a constant force in the darker fringes of North Texas techno for the past five years, holding his court at underground parties in warehouses in the wee hours of the night. In recent months, Bey has started performing on Bills with louder experimental acts with her live electronics alias, [S|3L], which defies categorization.

Bey says he’s “not really worried about genres.”

“Especially with some to come [S|3L] rejections, “he says.” They’re everywhere. ”

Between his two projects, Bey straddles the fine line between industrial grind, experimental power noise and metronomic techno without restricting his field of action to a single genre.

With nine releases on her own Temporal Loop imprint, which has released songs from artists such as Yin Yang Audio, Bey is a perfect case study of artists taking the business side of things into their own hands by focusing on artist relationships. -fan built. on Bandcamp, extract the best parts of the digital experience without all the fuss.

“Bandcamp is a really solid platform; it’s my favorite store to buy music, personally, ”says Bey. “Running a label can’t really make it any easier. The way they list supporters and the comments on the exit pages are my favorite. People can log in by musical taste and see other people’s libraries. J ‘wish it were that way. more people logged in. “
Declan james
Tag: Voidware

Declan James is another young talent who is making serious strides in hard techno, and by that we mean borderline speed metal. hard. With his collective and his label Voidware, James was a key figure in the rise of underground techno in Dallas. On the heels of his single “New Age Psychosis” on the Los Angeles-based Space Yacht label, James secured a seat at the famous EDC Festival in Las Vegas last October.

The experimental nature of its thrilling techno brand can be attributed to its musical diversity.

“I tend to avoid listening to a lot of techno music in my spare time,” says James. “I often worry that consuming too much of the same kind of music that I’m producing will make me make less exciting decisions when I’m producing. I take a lot of inspiration from avant-garde artists from the 60s and 70s like Residents, Magma and Aphrodite’s Child, to name a few. ”

The result is a deliciously blown sound, over-saturated with melodic sensibilities, and it is gaining ground among young fans of electronic music as the artist flirts with mainstream access.

“I think techno is really starting to come out of the underground and into the mainstream in the United States, and that will become more apparent in 2022,” James said. “The big question for me is not whether this is going to happen, but rather how we can ensure that the music continues to be represented correctly and does not turn into some sort of derision of it- same.”
Decoder
Label: Codec Recordings

The word “prodigy” is often used, but every once in a while an artist comes out of nowhere and deservedly earns this accolade. Over the past year, Decoder has made tsunami-sized waves by producing brilliant techno that rings light years from his teenage years. In 2021, he marked the spirits with a host of EP and the Monolithic activity spectrum Subsist label album, as well as Dark form, an album released by techno legend Jeff Mills on his Axis label. Decoder also earned the public seal of approval from Richie Hawtin, who named him as an emerging tech talent to watch out for.

Decoder’s music draws directly from the minimalist heart of classical techno, drawing on the essentials of loopy synths and motorik beats reminiscent of Mills or Robert Hood’s early years. It’s a side of techno that’s revered but not so common in the modern electronic landscape; the fact that this music comes from a teenage boy in Texas is downright mind-boggling. Decoder’s next EP is slated for release on his own label, Codec Recordings.
Swan
Label: Biosoft

For the past fifteen years, Cygnus has cultivated his own corner of the electro universe over nine albums and 19 EPs, most of them on vinyl. 2021 saw him return for his fourth outing, the 100% dope EP, on the famous British label Central Processing Unit. In addition to an already gigantic discography that eclipses just about any producer or band in town, the coming year will see Cygnus albums on Croatian label Barba Records as well as another LP on its own Biosoft imprint.

After plans for another trip over the pond to Europe were delayed for obvious pandemic reasons, Cygnus is focusing on finishing these next two big releases. Despite his mind-numbing production, Cygnus still managed to evolve his brand of electro with each release. How does he keep it fresh? Well, in his own words, “I allow myself to have a lot more fun in the studio, though, and I don’t take things very seriously,” Cygnus says. “Keeping a childish attitude lays the foundation for a lot of fun and the results are always great.”
Llora
Inhabiting a haunting melancholy driven by synths, Llora draws on the dark side of genres that end with the word “wave”, a fusion of retro influences reused in genuinely modern productions.

We only saw a few singles on Bandcamp and an outstanding video for the haunting single “Tired”, so we only get a glimpse of what a full Llora album has to offer. The artist already has a boxed album, and it should see the light of day sometime in 2022. Llora has already proven she has worthy material through amazing live performances further bolstered by the recent addition of the extraordinary percussionist. Stefan Gonzalez. The dynamic interaction between the two musicians gives post-punk / new wave / EBM fans a very good reason to go out to local clubs.
Subduction / M’Ress
Tag: Endcom

Under her alias M’ress, Jessica Edeker explored dreamy ethereal landscapes on her brilliant 2020 album Poems. With her alias Subduction, she explores a darker path of eerie synth textures and hammered rhythms.

“I spent a lot of time exploring the EBM basslines and heavy arpeggiation on [the album] glamor and I exercised a lot of pent up feelings through this album, “Edeker says.” It was very therapeutic. ”

Both releases originated through his Endcom label, which Edeker co-founded with DJ and taste maker Rick Simpson.

“Ricky and I really want to build a label where we can feature artists who couldn’t release their music otherwise,” Edeker said.[Album] Endcom Compilation Vol. 1 was our first attempt to make this a reality “,
Visions of Glosters
Label: Cult of Science

Visions of Glosters is the production alias of Jimmy Freer and his partner Stefan Weise (aka Sirte), who have guided Science Cult to become the most powerful electronic label to come out of Dallas in decades. With a streak of over 30 releases over the past two years and a roster of top talent from around the world, the label’s notable artists include electro luminaries such as Tokyo-based Fleck ESC and Berlin-based Cyrk. Their commitment to local voices came through the 214 817 972 compilation featuring the crème de la crème of Dallas electronic artists: Aidin Hafezamini, Kerim Bey, TX Connect, Vectorvision, Red Eye and ill76.

With a focus on meticulously crafted vinyl releases, the label has earned its place on the international stage with an uncompromising take on techno, electro and IDM. The label’s commitment to vinyl releases is at the heart of its label concept.

“Sirte originally wanted a platform to tell a story written through a series of color-coded versions (Astra Specters) “says Freer.” The whole concept of integrating hidden messages was inspired by David Bowie’s latest album. We then developed this idea and, as vinyl collectors and DJs, we wanted all releases to have a narrative so that they were meaningful and timeless. ”

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Deja Vu: The Galeria Marcelo Guarnieri exhibition revisits the emblematic installation by Guto Lacaz from 1986 https://russellchatham.com/deja-vu-the-galeria-marcelo-guarnieri-exhibition-revisits-the-emblematic-installation-by-guto-lacaz-from-1986/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 10:00:24 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/deja-vu-the-galeria-marcelo-guarnieri-exhibition-revisits-the-emblematic-installation-by-guto-lacaz-from-1986/ Guto Lacaz, O Trabalhador (The Worker), 1994, cutout on metal sheet, electrostatic painting, 55 x 45 cm, edition of 12 / Courtesy Galeria Marcelo Guarnieri After having organized seven solo exhibitions in 2021, the Galeria Marcelo Guarnieri in São Paulo closed the year with “Salão Nacional” (National Art Fair), a collective exhibition which runs until […]]]>

Guto Lacaz, O Trabalhador (The Worker), 1994, cutout on metal sheet, electrostatic painting, 55 x 45 cm, edition of 12 / Courtesy Galeria Marcelo Guarnieri

After having organized seven solo exhibitions in 2021, the Galeria Marcelo Guarnieri in São Paulo closed the year with “Salão Nacional” (National Art Fair), a collective exhibition which runs until January 29 with works by Contemporary Brazilian artists such as Guto Lacaz, Alex Vallauri, Amelia Toledo, Carlos Fajardo, Claudio Tozzi, Dudi Maia Rosa, Fábio Miguez, Flávia Ribeiro, Ivald Granato, José Resende, Leda Catunda, Luiz Paulo Baravelli, Marisa Bicelli, Zé Bico and Boi .

Guto Lacaz, Paisagem com Navio (Landscape with boat), 1980, Acrylic on canvas, 142 x 142 cm / Courtesy Galeria Marcelo Guarnieri

The exhibition takes its title from its centerpiece, “Salão Nacional”, a miniature two-part historical installation from 1986 by provocative Guto Lacaz, whose hypnotic and humorous work has been vital for four decades. The piece is an invitation to browse a three-dimensional model (with our eyes) in an imaginary exhibition presenting the works of his friends. It was exhibited for the first time at the Subdistrito gallery in Lacaz’s solo “Muambas” (Swags) in 1987, with installations, low-tech objects, drawings and paintings. A pioneer company, Subdistrito broke with the limited art market of the 1970s, still present in São Paulo, and bet on a host of young artists, now mostly celebrated, many of whom are represented in the Salão Nacional . The legendary gallery opened in 1985 but closed its doors five years later when two of the four partners died of HIV-related causes, an emotional devastation for the crowd of close-knit artists of those bygone days.

Guto Lacaz, Salão Nacional (National Art Fair), 1986, mixed media, 110v, 145 x 38 x 12 cm / Courtesy of Galeria Marcelo Guarnieri

Guto Lacaz, Salão Nacional (National Art Fair), 1986, mixed media, 110v, 145 x 38 x 12 cm / Courtesy of Galeria Marcelo Guarnieri

Heavyweights of contemporary Brazilian art are represented in the Salão Nacional, now recognized as a visionary and seminal artist. For those who were part of the ’80s art scene, like me, this is an incredible déjà vu experience. From left to right, a litany of visual artists: a small circular room on the left wall by Flávia Ribeiro (born 1954); a vertical yellow painting by Dudi Maia Rosa (born 1946); an anonymous photo of a building; a characteristic striped painting by Cássio Michalany (born 1949); a photo of Leda Catunda (born 1961) in front of a vertical mirror work by Carlos Fajardo (born 1941) that reflects her attractive figure; a black and white photo by Marisa Bicelli of transvestite Argentine showman Patricio Bisso as Janis Joplin; an anonymous aluminum sculpture; a cover of Gallery Around magazine that deals with the concept of falsity, with a George Hurrell photo of Golden Age Hollywood starlet Ann Sheridan; 80s relief PVC graffiti “Frango Assado” (roast chicken) by naturalized Brazilian of Ethiopian origin Alex Vallauri, a pioneer graffiti artist (1949-1987); a Cara (Face) by Guto Lacaz (born in 1948) parodying the famous Cara series created by Luiz Paulo Baravelli (born in 1942); and hung on the far right of the “art exhibition,” a neo-expressionist painting by Fábio Miguez (b.1962), then a 24-year-old rebel member of the all-male art gang Casa 7.

Guto Lacaz, Rádios Pescando (Radios Fishing), 1986, plastic and metals, 80 x 105 x 100 cm / Courtesy Galeria Marcelo Guarnieri

Unleashing his rich imagination, after building the model, Guto collected the images from the pages of the daily magazines, then cut out and pasted the photos on the walls of his Lilliputian event, magnified by a hidden fluorescent light. To better understand the 1:20 scale model, there is a near-full-body magazine photo of a twenty-five-year-old Leda Catunda donning a miniskirt, which was all the rage at the time of its publication. Attached to the frame near the ’80s art muse, a rudimentary little button allows the viewer to flirt with the charming Leda by manually rotating her cutout figure. Guto always finds a way for his iconic cartoonish version of Dada’s quintessential masked in vintage pop culture. It’s Guto who is Guto.

Guto Lacaz, Hi Fi, 2008, graffiti, enamel paint on canvas, 200 x 100 cm / Courtesy Galeria Marcelo Guarnieri

The prophetic narrative arc of the play’s current falsity debate as well as the significant group motivated gallery owner Guarnieri to prepare the tribute. After collecting all the works he could find in the original model, he added other relevant names from the 80s, for a total of twenty-eight pieces. He learned that one of them, “Cara para Guto” (Face for Guto), refers to an old joke between friends Guto and Baravelli. In 1986, inspired by Baravelli’s iconic Caras (Faces) series, Guto produced a tiny Cara in his friend’s style, expressly to fit the 1:20 scale of the Salão Nacional. The current exhibition in his gallery presents a two-meter-high version of the work recently reproduced by Baravelli which below gives a stimulating testimony and has fun with the parody which comes full circle after thirty-five years.

Visible to La Machine du monde, currently at the Pinacoteca de São Paulo, Guto Lacaz, Homem na Escada (Man on a scale), 1986, enamel paint on wood, 322 x 152 x 3 cm. Silvia Velludo and Marcelo Guarnieri Collection, São Paulo

Guto, 73, is in full swing for 2022; he also has five works in one of the main current museum exhibitions, “A Máquina do Mundo” (The Machine of the World), a must-see at the São Paulo Pinacoteca. Among them, another parody is “Homem na escada” (Man on the Ladder), a three-meter-tall 1986 painting that plays Duchamp’s revolutionary 1912 “Nude descending a staircase (No. 2)”, in Guto Lacaz packed. style.

The following testimonies have been edited and condensed.

Guto Lacaz, Colar Volátil (Volatile Necklace), 1980s, Acrylic paint and golden pigment, 30 x 26 cm / Courtesy of Galeria Marcelo Guarnieri

José Augusto Ribeiro, curator of “La Machine du monde”:

“For his ability to combine invention, criticism and humor, Guto Lacaz is at the same level as Marcel Duchamp, Flávio de Carvalho, Alexander Calder, Jacques Tati, his friend Luiz Paulo Baravelli. It amazes me how rigorous it is and how it articulates different narratives, not only in the field of visual arts (painting, sculpture, drawing, etc.), but also in design, architecture, theater and performance. performance. Rooted in his experiences, there is an intelligent criticism that nods to the efficiency of modern life. His imaginative constructions defy expectations with concepts, images and situations that open up several signifiers. An example is his synaesthetic work, “Eletro Esfero Espaço” (Electro Sphere Space), a 1986 installation in the Pinacoteca collection presented for the first time at the São Paulo Biennale in 1987. He invites the viewer to parade on a red carpet lined with two parallel rows of standing vacuums with ping-pong balls in a gravity-defying experience. All supported by a haunting soundtrack, a looping fragment of Wagner’s Tannhäuser. Brilliant. “

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Partial view of the collective exhibition Salão Nacional at the Galeria Marcelo Guarnieri, São Paulo / Photo Maurício Froldi. Courtesy of Galeria Marcelo Guarnieri

Marcelo Guarnieri, founder and director of Galeria Marcelo Guarnieri:

“Guto Lacaz’s work is an example of originality. One of its strengths is its ability to combine intelligence and refined humor. I have collected his work since I first saw it. Everything he produces is interesting and impeccably done. In Brazilian art, it is rare to find such an impressive production delivered with doses of humor, nuanced refinement and insightful commentary, as evidenced by its production of more than four decades. Guto is a master.

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Luiz Paulo Baravelli, Cara para Guto (Face for Guto), 2021, acrylic and encaustic on plywood and string, 199.5 cm high, 96 x 9.5 cm / Courtesy Galeria Marcelo Guarnieri

Luiz Paulo Baravelli, artist:

“The artist’s social role is to communicate a certain degree of consciousness through something which does not exist but which nevertheless has a name. When a viewer observes a work by Guto, a certain awareness is shared. This empty mental space is called art. The “Cara para Guto” (Face for Guto), which I created for the show, is actually a two-way farce that began when he parodied one of my works by Cara in 1986 for the show. include in his model work Salão Nacional. Now, thirty-five years later, I have parodied with “Cara para Guto” in full size. “

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Claudio Tozzi, Aviador (Aviator), 1986, acrylic on canvas, 120 x 120 cm / Courtesy Galeria Marcelo Guarnieri

Claudio Tozzi, artist:

“His interventions in graphic paradigms introduce new premises into the visual field through his ability to transgress the meaning of the image, thus determining new signifiers. He uses technological possibilities and designs unexpected physical spaces where the viewer is invited to move around and become part of the work while participating in the creation of the object. Despite Brazil’s current broken politics, Guto still finds a way to convey his distinctive sense of humor.

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Dudi Maia Rosa, Untitled, 1984, polyester resin, 20 x 100 cm / Courtesy Galeria Marcelo Guarnieri

Dudi Maia Rosa, artist:

“He is himself. His works are immediately recognizable: it is about Guto! His creativity blends humor, graphics and aesthetic principles, wrapped in ingenious solutions with effortless grace. I feel privileged to be a contemporary of this excellent artist and beloved human being.

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Flávia Ribeiro, Untitled, 1980s, asphalt and encaustic on canvas, 39 x 39 cm / Courtesy Galeria Marcelo Guarnieri

Flávia Ribeiro, artist:

“Guto swims against the tide, relishes his own independent thoughts, feels free to speculate on new ideas. His work is intelligent, critical, underlined by a humorous and questioning tone.

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Marisa Bicelli, Untitled (portrait of Patricio Bisso), 1980s, photograph / Courtesy of Galeria Marcelo Guarnieri

Marisa Bicelli, photographer, painter and designer:

“Who is Guto Lacaz? When you think you know him, you’re taken aback, he’s unpredictable. To say that we are flabbergasted by his works is an understatement. In his 1982 “Óleo Maria à Procura da Salada” (Maria Olive Oil Searching for the Salada), a can of olive oil (with a mini motor hidden inside topped by a tiny rotating external radar system). round) spins and spins imitating a bumper car toy on an egg-yellow platter in search of the green salad. In my mind, the wacky system searches for words to define it. Cole Porter must have written ‘You’re the Top’ for Guto. ”

Guto Lacaz and Laurie Anderson at MoMA PS1 where he was exhibiting, NYC, 1987 / Courtesy of the artist

A Máquina do Mundo (The machine of the world)
Until February 21, 2022
Organized by José Augusto Ribeiro
São Paulo Pinacoteca
https://www.pinacoteca.org.br

Salão Nacional (National Art Fair)
Until January 29, 2022
Marcelo Guarnieri Gallery, São Paulo

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‘Hellboy: The Bones of Giants’ # 3 -– The Merging of the Nine Realms https://russellchatham.com/hellboy-the-bones-of-giants-3-the-merging-of-the-nine-realms/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 13:00:28 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/hellboy-the-bones-of-giants-3-the-merging-of-the-nine-realms/ Hellboy: Bones of the Giants # 3 | Writer: Mike Mignola, Christopher Golden | Artist: Matt Smith | Letter: Clem Robins | Colorist: Chris O’Halloran | Cover Artist: Matt Smith In the last issue, we found a Swedish professor, Dr. Aickman, knowingly drinking from Thrym’s mug in order to bring him back from the dead. […]]]>

Hellboy: Bones of the Giants # 3 | Writer: Mike Mignola, Christopher Golden | Artist: Matt Smith | Letter: Clem Robins | Colorist: Chris O’Halloran | Cover Artist: Matt Smith

In the last issue, we found a Swedish professor, Dr. Aickman, knowingly drinking from Thrym’s mug in order to bring him back from the dead. In this endeavor he succeeded. However, he did not survive the ascent of the Frost Giant, and his daughter, Pernilla, is completely and utterly affected by it because the myths are real … and her father is dead.

Hellboy, still attached to Mjolnir, seems to have a deeper connection to the mind and soul of the late Thor with each passing day, a possession that will undoubtedly leave scars on his mind, i.e. ‘he survives it.

The Earth seems to have been immersed in a certain conjunction of the spheres. Parts of the nine realms merge into each other.

The still weak and tired Ice King decided to disappear and head north, trapping and absorbing the life force of the defenseless humans in his path.

The Nivadellim are resolutely on Hellboy’s side and fight, sometimes to the death, with the monsters and creatures from other realms who have infiltrated this reality.

And now, after several days of chasing him, the BPRD and the dwarves are finally ready to face Thrym. This will not happen in a human village. It looks like the landscape has changed and Hellboy and the Dwarves must face off against the giant Frost King right inside the Citadel of the Giants, Utgard.

Hellboy: Bones of the Giants # 3 is available January 5, 2022.

Genre: Fantasy, Horror
Release date: January 05, 2022
Format: FC, 32 pages; Mini series
Price: $ 3.99
UPC: 7 61568 00873 9 00311

Image presented by Math Smith, all images are owned by Dark Horse Comics

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Saudi artists tap into their emotions https://russellchatham.com/saudi-artists-tap-into-their-emotions/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:25:07 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/saudi-artists-tap-into-their-emotions/ Palestinian artist Samia Halaby talks about her latest exhibition, “Flurrying” DUBAI: Palestinian artist Samia Halaby, who just turned 85, has been painting for over 60 years, and she continues to learn and discover. “Absolutely, you keep learning,” she told Arab News from her New York studio. “If you stop learning, you repeat yourself; it becomes […]]]>

Palestinian artist Samia Halaby talks about her latest exhibition, “Flurrying”

DUBAI: Palestinian artist Samia Halaby, who just turned 85, has been painting for over 60 years, and she continues to learn and discover.

“Absolutely, you keep learning,” she told Arab News from her New York studio. “If you stop learning, you repeat yourself; it becomes a performance, and at what point does it get boring?

Halaby’s latest exhibition, “Flurrying,” which ran through Jan. 5 at the Ayyam Gallery in Dubai, features a series of personal memories and scattered shapes intertwined on abstract canvases, some of which were painted during the locking. She experiments with hand movements, creating geometric and gestural compositions bursting with color and movement.

“Evening in the Desert”, 2019. (Provided)

A 2021 coin shares the show’s name. The canvas is full of vibrant lines, almost attacking each other, representing a spectacle observed by Halaby on a winter’s day. “It was snowing between two buildings and the wind was blowing the snow in all kinds of directions,” she recalls. “I took a video of it and thought, ‘Aha! This is the answer to all the questions I ask myself.

For Halaby, her art is trying to capture small moments that catch her eye and stay in her mind. “We’ve all seen dandelions fly, snow flurries or rain fall,” she explains. “Our brain registers them, our eye registers them. We may not have the verbal language to express them, but I have given you visual language to express them.

In “Evening in the Desert”, painted in 2019, a kaleidoscope of squares and cubes roams in shades of purple, blue and yellow. “It’s a very special moment,” she says. “A good friend invited my sister and I to dinner in Jordan. We drove to Ghor (in the Jordan Valley) and had a great day. On the way back, the sun was setting and I couldn’t believe what I was looking at: the beauty of the color; the subtlety, the fine differences.

“Surprising Trails”, 2019. (Provided)

Another piece on display was inspired by a conversation between Halaby and a fellow Palestinian painter, who creates works based on calligraphy. “She said, ‘I think of my parents and write them letters to tell them about what we are going through in Palestine,” said Halaby. “She was crying as she wrote these letters. It was so touching. So I was kind of influenced by her.

“Written in White Air for Palestine” is rendered in a flurry of brush marks, in which you can almost spot an Arabic letter or two, as part of what she calls the “calligraphic movement”. It strikes near us in several ways.

“Flurrying”, 2021. (Provided)

Born in Jerusalem, Halaby left her homeland 70 years ago. She started painting during her childhood. “I remember my paternal aunt once found me making paintbrushes out of chicken feathers,” she says. “My sister and her friend would ask me to draw for them. The idea of ​​becoming a professional painter was thanks to my mother, who encouraged me.

Since the age of 14, Halaby has lived in the United States, but the memory of his true homeland still influences his art. “My commitment to Palestine is permanent. It’s part of me, ”she says. “I experienced the heartbreak of my father and my mother and their generation. “

Halaby is now a member of a respected group of Arab modernists of the second half of the 20th century; she is friends with the Jordanian sculptor Mona Saudi and has exchanged letters with the late poet and painter Etel Adnan. An admirer of nature and Islamic geometry, abstraction is and has been her profession, which she describes as “the language of the future for painting”.

“Written with a Brush”, 2019. (Provided)

Even with all of her years of experience, she says it can still be difficult to know when a painting is finished. “It’s one of the hardest things. I don’t think I have a (complete) answer, ”she said. “It’s easy to ruin a painting, but it’s also important to recognize that you have ruined it as well. “

There is something warm and reassuring about Halaby – she encourages viewers to stick to their own interpretation and understanding of a work of art, even if it is not the one its producer intended.

“I think viewers should trust their own feelings. When you look at a painting and see clues, you have to trust it, ”she says. “The fact that you come to the board and see something there – whatever you see – makes me feel better.”


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Nature inspires the January exhibition at the Mesilla Valley Fine Arts Gallery https://russellchatham.com/nature-inspires-the-january-exhibition-at-the-mesilla-valley-fine-arts-gallery/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 21:52:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/nature-inspires-the-january-exhibition-at-the-mesilla-valley-fine-arts-gallery/ Report Bulletin It’s Jane and Jan in January at the Mesilla Valley Fine Arts Gallery (MVFA), 2470-A Calle de Guadalupe, opposite the Fountain Theater in the historic Mesilla Plaza, while the work of Jane Madrid and Jan Severson will be on display at the gallery during the month of January 2022. The gallery will also […]]]>

Report Bulletin

It’s Jane and Jan in January at the Mesilla Valley Fine Arts Gallery (MVFA), 2470-A Calle de Guadalupe, opposite the Fountain Theater in the historic Mesilla Plaza, while the work of Jane Madrid and Jan Severson will be on display at the gallery during the month of January 2022. The gallery will also exhibit woodwork and photographs by a new MVFA artist during the month.

Madrid has lived in Las Cruces since 1959 and painted since the age of 8. Her serious work started around 2005. Jane’s main painting mediums are oil and some acrylic. Its main artistic themes are centered on nature, with a particular emphasis on animals, flowers, birds and the landscape. She is an active member of several organizations and promotes art in the region.

Severson spent her working life in a large IT company as an educational consultant. By accident, and with the encouragement of a good friend, she began to weave and found that it had become a passion that brought her a great sense of joy and accomplishment. While she prefers the colors of nature, you will often find her weaving with colorful reed, threads, wooden objects and beads. The beauty and diversity of New Mexico is often the inspiration for his art.

“I hope those who give my designs a home find joy and beauty in them,” said Severson.

A new MVFA artist will also be exhibiting in the gallery in January: Woody Hoffman.

Hoffman’s photography hobby grew into a full-time endeavor after years of traveling across the country, presenting juryed art exhibitions, and starting a gallery in Silverton, Colo. Hoffman is retired from the Colorado Department of Agriculture. He moved to Las Cruces in 2004, where he took up another old hobby: woodturning.

Every year, Hoffman attends seminars to hone his skills, learn new techniques, and improve and update his equipment. It is owned by the artists of Picacho Hills and participated in the Las Cruces Farmer’s Market. Hoffman has also exhibited in galleries in Santa Fe and Las Cruces. Most of the wood he uses comes from recycled sources where it was intended for firewood, but special woods and burls are purchased for special parts. All of its utility parts have a food safe finish.

MVFAG features the work of 30 artists in a variety of media including oil, acrylic, pastels, watercolor, fused glass art jewelry, woodturns, stained glass, photography, ceramics , mixed media, decorated gourds, handmade textile weaves, art tile, fiber art, natural gemstone jewelry, colored pencil, basketwork, charcoal, pen and ink, prints, miniature maps and paintings.

MVFAG is open every day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

First American Bank, 1553 Avenida de Mesilla, is well represented by gallery members who rotate their work monthly at the bank.

Call 575-522-2933. Visit www.mesillavalleyfinearts.com.


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Lil Nas X opens up about coming out and celebrating his sexuality https://russellchatham.com/lil-nas-x-opens-up-about-coming-out-and-celebrating-his-sexuality/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 19:06:55 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/lil-nas-x-opens-up-about-coming-out-and-celebrating-his-sexuality/ Lil Nas X has opened up about coming out as “Old Town Road” topped the charts and celebrated his sexuality. The rapper and singer revealed his homosexuality in June 2019 and admitted in an interview at the time that LGBTQ + people “aren’t really accepted” into the country music or rap communities. In a new […]]]>

Lil Nas X has opened up about coming out as “Old Town Road” topped the charts and celebrated his sexuality.

The rapper and singer revealed his homosexuality in June 2019 and admitted in an interview at the time that LGBTQ + people “aren’t really accepted” into the country music or rap communities.

In a new interview with SCS, Lil Nas X said he decided to go out when the world’s attention was on him because of ‘Old Town Road’ because it “would have been the most authentic moment.” “It’s like I’m not doing it for attention,” he explained. “I’m already like the number one artist in the world right now.”

When asked if he was afraid to be himself publicly, he replied, “There was definitely some fear there. There will always be fear when you do something that literally changes your life. But you just have to do it, you know?

He also spoke about how the music industry wants to group gay performers together. “I feel like I’m definitely a lot more ‘out there’ with it,” he said. “It’s always been ‘OK, if you’re gay this has to be sanitized. Let’s not include anything sexual ”. It’s like, ‘Be gay without being gay. We don’t want to know what’s going on behind closed doors, or we don’t want you to voice it ”.

“I say I’ll do it if I want to. And I want all the other artists to feel the same.

Last year, Lil Nas X said he felt “bad” for DaBaby after the rapper suffered huge backlash for making homophobic comments on stage. DaBaby was removed from several festival lineups because of it and then issued an apology to the LGBTQ + community.

“I’m not going to lie, I feel bad for DaBaby,” said Lil Nas X. “I hope he comes out of this. I hope he is able to. But I do not know. The whole landscape is very hypermasculine.


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From Titanium to Wolf Alice: A Complete Guide to This Week’s Entertainment | Culture https://russellchatham.com/from-titanium-to-wolf-alice-a-complete-guide-to-this-weeks-entertainment-culture/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/from-titanium-to-wolf-alice-a-complete-guide-to-this-weeks-entertainment-culture/ Illustration: Lalalimola / The Guardian To go out: Movie theater TitaniumOutside nowWow ! The shot in the arm that cinema needs right now, Julia Ducournau’s Titanium – starring Agathe Rousselle as a runaway serial killer – draws on the work of directors such as David Cronenberg, to deliver a juicy, thrilling and auto-erotic thriller that’s […]]]>

Illustration: Lalalimola / The Guardian

To go out: Movie theater

Titanium
Outside now
Wow ! The shot in the arm that cinema needs right now, Julia Ducournau’s Titanium – starring Agathe Rousselle as a runaway serial killer – draws on the work of directors such as David Cronenberg, to deliver a juicy, thrilling and auto-erotic thriller that’s not for the faint of heart.

Cinderella: Met Opera 2022
Outside now
Start 2022 the way you want it by getting up from bed on New Year’s Day, arguably fresh and without a hangover, and treat yourself to this 90-minute adaptation of Jules Massenet’s lyrical version of the classic fairy tale, live from the New York Metropolitan Opera. Isabel Leonard plays the eponymous heroine.

Louis Wain’s electric life
Outside now
Even if you’ve never heard of prolific artist Louis Wain, you’ve probably seen his work before – his distinctive anthropomorphic cat images have a magic all their own. This quirky biopic explores the man behind the kittens, with Benedict Cumberbatch in the lead role.

Humans
Outside now
Writer-director Stephen Karam adapts his winning play Tony to a terrific effect, as the Blake family gather in downtown Manhattan to celebrate Thanksgiving in a pre-war apartment building that has seen better days. The stellar cast includes Amy Schumer, Richard Jenkins and Steven Yeun. Catherine bray


To go out: Concerts

Being Frank ... Joji.
Being Frank … Joji.

Joji
O2 Shepherd’s Bush Empire, London, January 6 & 7I
Lo-fi R&B practitioner Joji started life as hugely popular YouTube prankster Filthy Frank before releasing comedy songs as Pink Guy. In late 2017, he focused on a more serious exit as Joji, a move that paid off, with both of these shows celebrating 2020’s Top 10 album, Nectar.

Wolf alice
5 to Jan. 31uary; start glasgow
Released unanimously last summer, Wolf Alice’s swashbuckling third album, Blue Weekend, finally has its chance to shine in theaters across the country. Full of polished alternative rock and big screen, this is a record designed for festival slots, so consider these shows just a warm-up. Michael cragg

Unsuk chin
Barbican Hall, London, January 6
The first performance of Unsuk Chin’s second violin concerto, Scherben der Stille (Shards of Silence), with Leonidas Kavakos as soloist, opens the London Symphony Orchestra concert. Simon Rattle conducts and follows with Sibelius’ Seventh Symphony and the suite to Bartók’s ballet score, The Miraculous Mandarin. André Clement

Scott Hamilton
Pizza Express Jazz Club, London, January 1 to 7
When Hamilton swinging was born in 1954, John Coltrane upset traditional jazz-sax thinking. But if the American once seemed out of step with progress, his musicality has conquered successive generations of fans. His regular London trio are joining this New Years trip. John fordham


To go out: Art

Turning around ... Spirales (2005) by Louise Bourgeois.
Turning around … Spirales (2005) by Louise Bourgeois. Photography: Marcus Leith / Marcus Leith

Artist rooms: Louise Bourgeois
Tate Liverpool, to 16 January
An exceptional selection of works by the artist who brought surrealism into the 21st century. A bourgeois can destabilize with a stuffed character, terrorize with a drawing. She helped invent the art of our time with her poetic installations. Yet his work is full of memories of a lost world.

The late police officer
Royal Academy of Arts in London, to 13 February
The blast of a winter day enters the art gallery in this brilliant exhibition. The agent’s last few years have been really cold. Yet the melancholy artist created his most romantic and expressive works, unforgettable forests, wild seas and skies etched in pain. A contemplative treat for the start of the year.

Rachel Knee
Yorkshire Sculpture Park, near Wakefield, to 24 Aprhe
If you fancy an invigorating New Years walk, the epic and memorable scenery of Yorkshire Sculpture Park is a great outing. And, in addition to strolling through the paths and meadows, one can see the sensual and disturbing art of this sculptor who creates swarms of naked Rodinesque bodies in white porcelain.

Peru
British Museum, London, to 20 February
Party with hallucinogenic pottery and ecstatic burial shrouds on this eye-opening journey through millennia of South American art. Over 2,000 years ago, the Nasca people not only drew vast hummingbirds and spiders in the earth, but also depicted severed heads, drugged musicians, and convicted prisoners on portable objects. A delight. Jonathan jones


To go out: Stage

Fair folded ... Russian Siberian State Ballet.
Fair folded … Russian Siberian State Ballet.

Russian Siberian State Ballet
St David’s Hall, Cardiff, January 2; on tour until March 26ch
This troupe (above) may not be in the Premier League of Russian Ballet, but they are bringing classical dance to more places in the UK than anyone, so get your tutu fix here, along with some ‘a live orchestra. Lyndsey Winship

Spring awakening
Almeida Theater, London, until January 22uary
Rupert Goold directs Tony and Olivier’s award-winning musical about a group of teens growing up inside and outside the classroom. Dazzling and devastating theater. Myriam Gillinson

Stewart lee
Leicester Square Theater, London, 4 to 13 January; on tour until July 3Yes
Resuming their canceled tour, Snowflake / Tornado, the stand-up returns to take a side look at Culture Wars. Don’t expect liberal pats on the back from the echo chamber; expect exasperated riffs on other comedians. Rachel Aroesti

Sleeping Beauty
Kings Theater, Edinburgh, January 16uary
As a tribute to the longtime panto clown, Andy Gray, Allan Stewart and Grant Stott revive their heartbreaking double act, as silly as ever. MG


Stay at home: Diffusion

Peake Show ... Anne.
Peake Show … Anne. Photograph: Justin Slee / Justin Slee / ITV

Anne
ITV Center
Anne Williams’ son Kevin was 15 when he died in the Hillsborough disaster: she would spend the rest of her life fighting for justice for him and the other Liverpool fans who were killed that day. Maxine Peake (above) plays her in a drama honoring her indomitable activism.

Tinseltown Toast
BBC iPlayer
There’s something distinctly old-soho about Steven Toast, the mustached character with the imperious boom (naturally – he’s played by Matt Berry). Yet on his last outing, he traded dusty ads for sparkling studios: Will Hollywood give this gloriously disconnected snob the recognition he certainly doesn’t deserve?

The tourist
BBC iPlayer
Memory loss thrillers have a moment: After the Connie Nielsen / Christopher Eccleston drama Close to Me comes this backcountry mystery from the creators of Baptiste. A Briton (Jamie Dornan) wakes up in the hospital not knowing who he is; unfortunately, the nefarious figures of his past have not forgotten him.

Pen15
Now
This extremely evocative high school sitcom sees Anna Konkle and Maya Erskine relive the abject trauma of early adolescence playing their 13-year-old selves in the middle of a sea of ​​real teenagers. Now he’s saying woefully awkward farewells with a final batch of episodes delayed by Covid. RA


Stay at home: Games

Meet cute ... Animal Crossing: New Horizons.
Meet cute … Animal Crossing: New Horizons. Photography: Nintendo

Animal crossing: new horizons
Nintendo Switch
New year, new start, right? Over the past few months, players have been doing some amazing things with the new content and updates from Animal Crossing (above), so there’s no shortage of inspiration to refresh your Virtual Island. If you haven’t played in a while, now is the time to come back.

Grand Theft Auto Online
PlayStation, Xbox, PC
If you can cope with the sheer and violent anarchy of GTA, Rockstar recently released a new storyline starring Grand Theft Auto V star Franklin now a celebrity fixer in which you have to track down unreleased music from the real Dr Dre. Keza MacDonald


Stay at home: Albums

Moses Sumney – Live from Blackalachia
Outside now
Recorded last summer in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina, this 14-track live album captures the musical polymath (below) performing in front of an audience of trees with “The Grasshoppers Our Background Singers.” Sumney also directed the accompanying film, Blackalachia, with songs from Aromanticism from 2017 and Græ from last year.

Beverly Glenn-Copeland – Keyboard fantasies reinvented
Outside now
Glenn-Copeland’s cult electronic opus from 1986 Keyboard Fantasies (above) – reissued with huge success in 2016 – is reworked by Bon Iver, Blood Orange and Kelsey Lu. Haunted and Hollow, Arca’s piano remix brave Let Us Dance stands out.

Itzy – Iyou Itzy
Outside now
After making inroads in America, the K-pop girl group has now set their sights on Japan. This brilliantly titled compilation, which features reworkings of their greatest Japanese singles, is also accompanied by a selection of their mind-blowing choreographed videos.

Spector – Now Or every time
Outside January 7
True to their Twitter biography of “Part-time rock band”, London art-rock quartet Spector returns with their third album since forming in 2011. The five singles of Now or Whenever have so far been slipping between indie disco galloping of No One Knows Better and I ‘m Not Crying You’re Crying, the pocket symphony of the 80s. MC


Stay at home: Brain food

Have a pop art ... Andy Warhol.
Have a pop art … Andy Warhol. Photograph: na / BBC / Getty

Andy Warhol’s America
BBC two, January 6
This expansive three-part documentary (above) examines how Andy Warhol’s development of pop art intersected with 20th century American history. We open on his rise to glory and the astute analysis of American consumerism in his early works.

Things you should know
Podcast
Airing since 2008, this acclaimed podcast from hosts Chuck Bryant and Josh Clark shows no sign of running out of things we should be learning. The episodes take a light approach to everything from hysteria to dentistry.

Letterheady.com
In line
Celebrating the art of written correspondence, this archive from the creator of Letters of Note displays intriguing letterhead designs of famous personalities. Among the curiosities are the Looney Tunes cartoons by Warner Bros. and the serpentine scribble by artist Ray Johnson. Ammar Kalia

Stay in - Samedi Mag illo
Illustration: Lalalimola / The Guardian


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The best things we’ve seen this year in Metro Phoenix https://russellchatham.com/the-best-things-weve-seen-this-year-in-metro-phoenix/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/the-best-things-weve-seen-this-year-in-metro-phoenix/ The creative community has offered a fascinating mix of arts and culture this year, often working together to reveal the talent and resilience among us. Here’s a look back at 10 of the best things we’ve seen in 2021. Woman-centered exhibitions Knowing how sadly women are represented in most museum collections and exhibits, we were […]]]>

The creative community has offered a fascinating mix of arts and culture this year, often working together to reveal the talent and resilience among us. Here’s a look back at 10 of the best things we’ve seen in 2021.

Woman-centered exhibitions

Knowing how sadly women are represented in most museum collections and exhibits, we were delighted to see so many spaces focusing on the work of female artists in 2021. Our favorites included “Division of Labor: Women Shifting a Transnational Gaze ”at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art and“ Things We Carry ”at the Lisa Sette Gallery, which featured works by Angela Ellsworth as well as Merryn Omotayo Alaka and Sam Fresquez.

Click to enlarge

Artist Jeff Slim painted the entrance to Nurture House in Phoenix.

Lynn trimble

New creative spaces

We loved seeing new creative spaces open in 2021, as artists continued to find new ways to create and show their work. Palabras Bilingual Bookstore and Wasted Ink Zine Distro formed a creative hub called Nurture House, where other collaborators included local presses and a bakery. An indigenous art space called Cahokia has opened in Roosevelt Row, and artist Patricia Sannit has created the Rocking S Art Ranch which is home to several artist studios and shared workspaces.

Click to enlarge This is the center panel of Paul Coze's mixed-use mural, The Phoenix.  - CRAIG SMITH

This is the central panel of Paul Coze’s painting The Phoenix mural in mixed media.

Craig smith

Sky Harbor Airport Art

Art highlights in 2021 included the relocation of Paul Coze’s famous mural to his new home in the Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport rental car hub. The Phoenix Airport Museum also offered other delicacies, including exhibits highlighting the art of skate decks and muralists, which introduced Arizona-based artists to travelers around the world.

Click to enlarge Works by The Violet Protest were exhibited at the Phoenix Art Museum in 2021. - ANN MORTON

works of The purple protest were exhibited at the Phoenix Art Museum in 2021.

Ann morton

the Purple protest

Thousands of manufacturers from across the country have contributed red and blue textile squares to artist Ann Morton Purple protest which emphasizes civic engagement and collaboration. The project was exhibited at the Phoenix Art Museum in 2021, and numerous 8-by-8-inch works of art were sent to members of the United States Congress in an attempt to counter divisive rhetoric and encourage bipartisanship, resulting in makes a mixture of monumental art. and civic engagement.

Click to enlarge El Mac and Thomas "Broken" Marcus painted this mural in downtown Phoenix.  - DOWNTOWN PHOENIX, INC.

El Mac and Thomas “Breeze” Marcus painted this mural in downtown Phoenix.

Downtown Phoenix, Inc.

El Mac and Breeze fresco

In a year filled with creative collaborations, a mural painted in downtown Phoenix by Miles “El Mac” MacGregor and Thomas “Breeze” Marcus ranks high among our favorites. Title Si’alik Hiosik / Morning Flower, the 45-foot by 85-foot mural imbues the visual culture of the downtown core with the culture of its native peoples and recognizes the long trajectory of their continuing impact on the region.

Click to enlarge Canal Convergence featured new work by Phoenix-based choreographer and dancer Nicole Olson.  - NICOLE OLSON

Canal Convergence featured new work by Phoenix-based choreographer and dancer Nicole Olson.

Nicole olson

Will have at the water’s edge

Hundreds of people gathered around the Marshall Way Bridge along the Scottsdale waterfront in November, watching dancers Nicole Olson | MovementChaos perform a new work titled Will have as part of Canal Convergence. Dressed in bright red, they brought generous movements that infused the outdoor public art space with unprecedented joy and a strong sense of shared community.

Click to enlarge Zachary Justin's mural was part of "No content" in Roosevelt Row.  - LYNN TRIMBLE

Zachary Justin’s mural was part of “Uncontained” at Roosevelt Row.

Lynn trimble

Works “not contained”

Despite the reduction of First Friday for much of 2021, community members could still count on rotating exhibitions of fresh art in the form of murals created by Indigenous and Latino artists outside a container. expedition to Roosevelt Row, for the “Uncontained” project coordinated by Xico Arte y Cultura.

Click to enlarge Black Theater Troupe presents Black Nativity in Phoenix.  - BLACK THEATER TROUPE

The black theater troupe performs Black Nativity at Phoenix.

Black Theater Troupe

Highlights

Several creative spaces reached milestone moments in 2021, reminding the community that arts and culture have overcome all kinds of challenges over the years. As Black Theater Troupe presented its 50th season and Alwun House marked its 50th anniversary, for example, there was cause for celebration despite the devastating effects of COVID-19 on the local creative scene.

Click to enlarge Detail of the huge mural by Tammi Lynch-Forrest while it was in progress.  - TAMMI LYNCH FORREST

Detail of the huge mural by Tammi Lynch-Forrest while it was in progress.

Tammi Lynch-Forrest

Desert fauna mosaic

Tammi Lynch-Forrest completed her 100-foot mosaic mural in North Scottsdale in 2021, after spending three years on the piece, which features more than 200 species native to the Southwestern Desert. Commissioned by the Desert Mountain community, the mural features more than 50,000 tiles that create a scene showing the light of the desert passing from day to night. The mural is a testament to the resilience of desert and local artists.

Click to enlarge Looking across Central Avenue towards Burton Barr Central Library.  - LYNN TRIMBLE

Looking across Central Avenue towards Burton Barr Central Library.

Lynn trimble

Reopening of Burton Barr

Seeing the Burton Barr Central Library and other library branches gradually resume in-person services from April 2021, following COVID-19 closures that followed a major flood crisis, raised hope for the literary and cultural life of the city, and allowed us to celebrate the physical return of this cherished community space.


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Internship & Studio: Reflections on 2021 https://russellchatham.com/internship-studio-reflections-on-2021/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 17:49:36 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/internship-studio-reflections-on-2021/ It’s safe to say that 2021 was a better year than 2020. With the vaccine, life this year has become a little less scary. People started to come together, first in small groups, then with larger audiences for theaters and public events. Schools have reopened, offering both in-person and online attendance. We’ve learned to live […]]]>

It’s safe to say that 2021 was a better year than 2020. With the vaccine, life this year has become a little less scary. People started to come together, first in small groups, then with larger audiences for theaters and public events. Schools have reopened, offering both in-person and online attendance. We’ve learned to live a hybrid existence of meetings and virtual viewings, and for those with boosters, the actual presence of the audience at movies, shows, or parties.

Twenty-one also marked the year that Stage and Studio found a new home at ArtsWatch, and the year has passed quickly with a mix of artist profiles featuring BIPOC women who are not usually not featured, like costume designer Wanda Walden, visual artist Roberta Wong, and Indigenous artist Lillian Pitt, or arts patron Ronni Lacroute, as well as the most recent audio tour of the Beyond Van Gogh exhibit.


2021: THE YEAR IN REVIEW


Stage & Studio Host and Producer Dmae Lo Roberts joins ArtsWatch Editor-in-Chief Bob Hicks for an in-depth conversation about 2021 highlights and the trends they see happening in the art landscape for 2022 They also remember the losses the artistic community has endured and the resilience demonstrated by artists and organizations in Oregon and beyond.

Bob Hicks, editor of ArtsWatch, left, and Dmae Lo Roberts, host and producer of Stage & Studio.

We’ll also hear from arts editor Brett Campbell and art contributors Amy Leona Havin and Steph Littlebird talk about their top picks of 2021, a year in which the arts community has taken inspiration from the world around them and shows real creativity in its expression despite the challenges. of COVID-19.

Subscribe and listen to Stage & Studio on: Apple, Google, Spotify, Android and Sticher.

Listen to past shows on Stage & Studio Site. Musical theme by Clark Salisbury.

Highlights from the podcast include…

Analyzes of art’s response to the pandemic:

Hicks: “Art is a response to what surrounds it. It is a response to its time. And it’s a response to its own culture and, you know, one way or another, the arts always reflect the culture and times they come from.

Roberts: “I think back to… Molière, for example, and all his comedies came out of the plague. I even think back to Shakespeare’s time and the Great Fire (of London), and the art continued and the live performances continued, and it was a way of responding to the horrific circumstances of the world around them. … Personally, I feel changed by this experience, especially in the way I want to live and work.

Hicks: “Streaming something isn’t the same as being in a live space, experiencing something, but it also challenged creators to find new ways to create. And some (the experiences) were very, very good. And I think it’s possible that we see, for example, in the theater world, maybe the aspects of the movie (and) the video that people have learned will be part of new shows as we go along. .

Roberts: “Arts funders have, perhaps because of the clawback money, and also because of great compassion, have been more responsive to what arts groups, organizations and individual artists need to to create now and to the changes that must take place in order for them to create and for organizations to survive. So in many ways there was a great compassion that I would like to see continue. “

How ArtsWatch differs from mainstream journalism and is good at getting an insider’s perspective on the arts:

Hicks: Many of our contributors are themselves artists of one form or another. So you don’t have that “here are the artists and here are the critics” dichotomy setup that is so common in newspapers and magazines. I think it’s really good that the people who do the work also write about the work. Not necessarily their own work, and not necessarily in a critical capacity, but to be able to get artists to write about other artists.

The three best pieces from the Indigenous History and Resilience series by Steph Littlebird, featuring Grand Ronde artist and teacher Greg Archuleta, drag clown artist and performer Anthony Hudson and Oregon Symphony stage manager Lori Trephibio.

Top Live and Streaming Events came from Amy Leona Havin, including Gary Shteyngart at the Portland Book Festival, dancer Linda Austin at Performance Works Northwest, and audio performances here, here and here from Cygnet Radio Hour.

Better in-person and streaming performance by Brett Campbell, such as Bag & Baggage Productions, 45th Parallel, Fear No Music, Oregon Symphony, Portland Baroque Orchestra, to name a few.

Overall, despite the pandemic, art has survived in Oregon in many ways and shows the true power of the arts in overcoming the worst of situations.

Also in “2021: the year in review”

  • The 10 best films of the year by Marc Mohan. ArtsWatch’s chief film columnist chooses and hires them, from The lost girl at Memory at Macbeth’s tragedy.
  • 2021: The people who made art. From Damien Geter and Leapin ‘Louie to Bonnie Meltzer and Willy Vlautin, celebrating nearly 30 Oregon artists whose visions stood out and helped define and rethink a precarious year.


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