Landscape Artist – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 09:26:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://russellchatham.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2.png Landscape Artist – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ 32 32 glenstone museum adds new building dedicated to simple new work by richard serra https://russellchatham.com/glenstone-museum-adds-new-building-dedicated-to-simple-new-work-by-richard-serra/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 08:33:15 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/glenstone-museum-adds-new-building-dedicated-to-simple-new-work-by-richard-serra/ A NEW ADDITION TO THE GLOBAL COLLECTION OF MINIMAL PAVILIONS Glenstone Museum in Potomac opened a new Designed by Thomas Phifer and Partners building to house the sculpture Four towers: equal weight, unequal measure2017, by Richard Serre. Designed in collaboration with the artist, the 4,000 square foot concrete structure is the first new construction on […]]]>

A NEW ADDITION TO THE GLOBAL COLLECTION OF MINIMAL PAVILIONS

Glenstone Museum in Potomac opened a new Designed by Thomas Phifer and Partners building to house the sculpture Four towers: equal weight, unequal measure2017, by Richard Serre. Designed in collaboration with the artist, the 4,000 square foot concrete structure is the first new construction on the of the museum grounds since the pavilions opened in 2018.

The new building marks an addition to the overall collection of austere and minimalist pavilions located in Maryland and all produced by Thomas Phifer and Partners.

GLENSTONE CONTINUES TO CELEBRATE THE WORK OF RICHARD SERRA

On June 23, 2022, Glenstone Museum introduces the new structure, the installation of Richard Serra and a connecting promenade. Museum visitors approach the concrete volume via a wooded path along the east side of the Glenstone property. A gently curving pathway that extends from the bridge over Greenbriar Creek ultimately allows visitors to enter the building through a single centered doorway. The boardwalk, structure and artwork expand the visitor experience at Glenstone, adding opportunities to engage with the art and architecture as well as the verdant landscape of the museum.

With the new additions, Glenstone continues to celebrate the work of Richard Serra with a number of his works currently on display at the museum. These works include Sylvester (2001) and Contour 290 (2004).

glenstone museum adds new building dedicated to simple new work by richard serra

“The work of Richard Serra has been a cornerstone of the collection since the early days of the museum”, said Emily Wei Rales, director and co-founder. “He helped build Glenstone’s reputation as a destination for site-specific monumental works of art. The addition of Four Rounds to our outdoor program is made even more special by the collaborative process between Richard and our architect, Tom Phifer. The building they designed is more than a container for sculpture; it is an integral part of the experience. We look forward to sharing the beauty of this extraordinary achievement with our visitors.

One of the most influential artists of his generation, Richard Serra (American, b. 1938), devoted his decades-long sculptural practice to considering the dynamics between form, space, and matter. Comprised of four cylindrical shapes forged from steel, each weighing 82 tons, Four towers: equal weight, unequal measure by Richard Serra is a monumental sculpture. The surface of each shape bears a rich, textured patina imprinted by the intense pressure of the forging process.

glenstone museum adds new building dedicated to simple new work by richard serra

The artwork is housed inside a no-frills cast-in-place concrete structure that visitors will approach along a winding promenade. The proportions of the interior building are adapted to the scale and location of the sculpture. A simple concrete roof is supported by large beams, which serve as walls for openings that illuminate the space. White glass skylights provide diffused daylight. Variations in light and shade are dictated by nature, providing visitors with an unmediated experience that changes with the season.

“It is a privilege to work with Glenstone again, all the more so because of the exceptional opportunity to engage with Richard Serra,” said Thomas Phifer. “Together we were able to examine every detail of how the volume of the space interacts with the masses within, how the different qualities of filtering light animate the surfaces of the sculpture, how the texture of the building’s concrete enters in dialogue with the spirit of Serra steel. I hope that visitors to Glenstone will feel as deeply satisfied as I do when they encounter this combination of place and object which is seemingly so simple and elemental in its entirety, and yet completely imbued with thought.

project info:

directors of glenstone: Emily Wei Rales, Director and Co-Founder; Mitchell P. Rales, Co-Founder
building architect: Thomas Phifer and Associates
landscape architect: Landscape Architecture PWP
revolutionary : February 22, 2021
public opening: June 23, 2022
structural engineer: Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, LLP
geotechnical engineering: Schnabel Engineering DCMEP
engineers: Muller Partners
lighting / daylight: Arup
civil engineer: vika
irrigation: Sweeney Associates

Juliana Neira I conceive

June 30, 2022

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Drexel University Academy of Natural Sciences Announces Watershed-Focused Art Exhibit and Experience https://russellchatham.com/drexel-university-academy-of-natural-sciences-announces-watershed-focused-art-exhibit-and-experience/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 10:18:30 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/drexel-university-academy-of-natural-sciences-announces-watershed-focused-art-exhibit-and-experience/ Opening August 3, 2022 at Drexel University’s Academy of Natural Sciences (the Academy), Watershed Moment is a multi-faceted project featuring art and sound installations and an outdoor adventure walk revealing the critical importance of watersheds in our lives. The Academy engaged Philadelphia-based New Paradise Laboratories to shape the creative approach. Featuring four experiences created by […]]]>

Opening August 3, 2022 at Drexel University’s Academy of Natural Sciences (the Academy), Watershed Moment is a multi-faceted project featuring art and sound installations and an outdoor adventure walk revealing the critical importance of watersheds in our lives. The Academy engaged Philadelphia-based New Paradise Laboratories to shape the creative approach. Featuring four experiences created by two teams of collaborating artists in response to the natural sciences and physical properties of water as it moves through the Philadelphia cityscape, Watershed Moment enables a deeper understanding of the Lower River watershed. Schuylkill and an appreciation of watersheds in general.

The project – the first public art commission presented by the Academy – is the flagship event of the institution’s annual 2022 Year of Water celebration, designed to connect people with their local waterways so to inspire care and action to protect them. Watershed Moment was supported by the Pew Center for Arts & Heritage.

Watershed Moment’s four art installations are:

Attunement, a monumental outdoor sound sculpture designed by David Gordon and made by Jordan Griska;

How to Get to the River, a 1.5-mile urban art adventure walk that takes participants from the main Academy Square where Attunement is located, down the Cherry Street Micro Shed to the Schuylkill River, culminating in Inside the Watershed;

Inside the Watershed, a sound installation located inside a wooden arbor located along the Schuylkill River Trail developed in collaboration with New Paradise Laboratories;

The River Feeds Back, an immersive sound installation created by Annea Lockwood and Liz Phillips currently on view at the Academy’s Dietrich Gallery.

Marina McDougall, vice president of the Academy of Experience and Engagement, said: “We should think of watersheds as our addresses, as defining the places we call home. Watersheds are the areas of the landscape that channel water as it falls from the atmosphere as snow or rain, flows through streams and streams and through varied terrain always seeking the lowest point as it moves out to sea Contemplating watersheds sets in motion a wondrous set of connections that bind us to the places we live—bioregions with unique ecologies defined by the relative presence or absence of water.Here in Philadelphia, we inhabit the riparian landscapes of the large watershed of the Delaware River and the smaller watersheds that nest within the basin Watershed Moment is a series of life-changing experiences based on watershed thinking ve rsants.

Harmonization

Installed in front of the Academy Museum on the benjamin franklin Parkway, Attunement (2022) is a large-scale sound sculpture by theater designer David Gordon in collaboration with Philadelphia-based experimental theater New Paradise Laboratories. At 35 feet tall, the work is inspired by the traditional Japanese garden ornament and suikinkitsu musical device. Crafted by Jordan Griska and constructed largely from recycled materials, including an oversized funnel, agricultural cistern and sousaphone bells and utilizing irrigation technologies, Attunement captures the action of collecting water droplets and illustrates how water from the atmosphere is transferred to larger bodies of water. It is a sonic translation of this process, providing both a visual representation of watershed science and a naturally amplified sonic experience.

How to get to the river

How to Get to the River (2022) is an outdoor art adventure walk that invites participants to investigate elements of the Schuylkill River Micro Shed, a section of the Delaware River watershed. Commissioned by the Academy, the creative team of Pete Angevine, Laia and Whit MacLaughlin from New Paradise Laboratories worked with scientists from the Academy’s Patrick Center for Environmental Research to develop urban walking. The research-based experience consists of a series of art installations and interventions – featuring sidewalk art, musical interludes, immersive sound experiences, creative signage, 2D art, sculpture, maps, lenticular imagery, playful interactions, etc. – which together lead the participants, physically and conceptually, to the river.

Sidewalk art for Minnow Run Reprise. Illustrator: Tiffanie Young

The walk starts at the Academy and takes participants on a 1.5 mile walk along Cherry Street to the Schuylkill River, then brings participants back. Participants will be guided by visual cues, marked trails, sound installations, maps indicating you are here, and imaginative cues to experience the urban watershed as a work of art in itself. Participants will activate sound elements with a digital keychain as they become aware of evidence of water flow as imprinted on the cityscape, noticing how water is channeled from the atmosphere into the ground, through pitched roofs, through gutters and into underground storm drains. A serpentine fugue for clarinet performed by British composer Shabaka Hutchings will accompany the journey triggered by RFID (radio frequency identification).

Visitors are encouraged to return to How to Get to the River several times throughout the exhibition presentation, as the experience is intended to change and evolve as sunlight, weather and seasons change. change.

How to Get to River Credits

Creative Team: Pete Angevine, Laia and Whit MacLaughlin

Research: Rohan Hejmadi and Salvador Plascencia

Composers and interactive sound artists: Annea Lockwood and Liz Phillips

Musician: Shabaka Hutchings

Media and sound: Greenhouse Media

Scenic and sculptural design: David Gordon

Manufacture: Jordan Griska

Illustrator: Tiffanie Young

Inside the watershed

Inside the Watershed (2022) is a sound installation located on the Schuylkill River Trail. The installation combines live sound and composition created by Annea Lockwood, known for her explorations of the rich world of sounds and natural acoustic environments, and Liz Phillips, who combines audio and visual forms with new technologies to create experiences interactive.

The project was developed by the artists in collaboration with New Paradise Laboratories. It delivers the live “voice” of the Schuylkill River through an array of underwater microphones, a motion-sensitive floating buoy, overhead speakers, and vibrations conducted into listeners’ bodies through specially designed benches housed in a wooden arbor. It will be live from sunrise to sunset, seven days a week. Inside the Watershed is designed as the culminating experience of How to Get to the River.

Rendering of the interior of the watershed (2022). Produced by New Paradise Laboratories

The river feeds

Another Lockwood and Phillips collaboration is The River Feeds Back (2022), a sensory experience and interactive exhibit bringing to the surface the deep sonic environment of the Schuylkill River watershed. They recorded at sites in Pennsylvania along 135 miles of the river, from its sources to its mouth, as well as its tributaries, including Tulpehocken Creek, French Creek and Wissahickon Creek. The result is a layered sound map that captures glimpses of the river system above and below its surface, including underwater life of aquatic insects, eels, fish, and swirling currents.

The River Feeds Back – on view in the Academy’s Dietrich Gallery since June 1 – is experienced through a variety of listening portals. Benches, hollowed-out tree trunks and chunks of slate encrusted with transducers (devices that translate electronic signals into sound waves of varying frequencies, some below the range of human hearing) provide a visceral experience of river and transport listeners to the underwater worlds of the Schuylkill. A table in the gallery features a map of the Schuylkill that identifies artists’ recording sites along the riverbank in tactile form.

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Why are we so drawn to elusive artists like Frank Ocean or Kendrick Lamar? https://russellchatham.com/why-are-we-so-drawn-to-elusive-artists-like-frank-ocean-or-kendrick-lamar/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 17:00:39 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/why-are-we-so-drawn-to-elusive-artists-like-frank-ocean-or-kendrick-lamar/ Greg Poblete 26 June 2022 – 10:00 Imagine queuing for a brand new roller coaster at an amusement park. The roller coasters are massive, stretching their tracks skyward as if trying to hug the clouds. We are thrilled because […]]]>





Why are we so drawn to elusive artists like Frank Ocean or Kendrick Lamar?







Imagine queuing for a brand new roller coaster at an amusement park. The roller coasters are massive, stretching their tracks skyward as if trying to hug the clouds. We are thrilled because we can see the loops, twists and colossal drop of the queue. And with every inch we move forward and forward a little further down the line; hearts sink with anticipation and excitement.

Now imagine if this roller coaster was indoors and entirely in the dark. From where online, we have no idea what to expect from the ride, how fast it goes and if there are any loops; everything is a mystery. Is there still the same excitement, or does the mystery bring out a new feeling?

The commonalities between the rollercoaster and the music are pretty thin, but there seems to be a similar thrill ruminating inside when an artist we haven’t heard from in a while releases a new album on the improvised.

Let’s look at artists like Frank Ocean, SZA, Taylor Swift and Kendrick Lamar. These artists remain relatively silent in the digital world until they release an album. And even then, they usually let the music speak for itself and stay out of the spotlight as little as possible, unless they’re touring. But despite being out of the public eye, these artists are constantly trending on social media, their music is still garnering millions of streams, and their fans are patiently waiting for a crumb of new music to fall into their lap.

On the other side, artists like Doja Cat, Lil Nas X, and Olivia Rodrigo always seem to be in the spotlight and have no problem sharing their daily lives and experiences with their fans online. Not that these artists aren’t as talented or exciting as the first ones, but as an audience member, knowing too much about an artist is almost unappealing.

Consider one of the hottest artists of the 2000s, Kanye West. When West was in the promotion cycle for his album, donda, in 2021, it felt like there was another outrageous West news story or headline everywhere you turned. Whether it’s unconventional sound album rollouthis flawed relationship with Kim Kardashian or the intriguing list of album features, there was always something new to say about Ye in those days.

Even with Kanye West fans, there was a time when some of his followers got sick of seeing Yeezy’s face everywhere. With the release dates pushed back and the constant stadium listening parties with the updated version of the album, many fans were getting burned out and just wanted him to release the album and dive in and not needn’t worry about the controversy surrounding West’s personal life. Of course, that’s a personal preference, but maybe some fans enjoy their art with a bit of mystery, turning to more elusive artists who keep their lives hidden from the world.

Frank Ocean is probably the most elusive and mysterious artist in pop culture today. No matter how often his name is trending on Twitter or how many “Self Control” covers are posted on TikTok, Ocean is still nowhere to be found. Or at least no one knows about updates regarding new music from Ocean.

Ocean was supposed to headline Coachella in 2020 when it wasn’t an imaginary year. And when the Desert Music Festival came to fruition in 2022, Ocean made it clear that he was still not ready to perform again and decided to be placed on the programming 2023 In place. A rather intriguing move from an artist with such demand, but apparently even a salary from Coachella isn’t enough to get Ocean out of hiding and performing.

Admittedly, Ocean is not entirely isolated. Fans constantly spot him ride a bike around New York, pretending to take phone calls and dressed like an absolute dad. But despite these rare sightings, very little is known about Frank Ocean’s forthcoming albums. And that unknown hint of whether or not music is on the horizon has fans glued to their seats.

Another artist who has been relatively quiet since their last release is Kendrick Lamar. Before announcing his most recent album about a month ago, there hasn’t been a peek from the corner of Kendrick since Damn. However, as much as fans speculated about a surprise drop, Kendrick released a legal letter stating his new album. Mr. Morale and Big Steps will be released on May 13, 2022.

May 13 has come and gone, and to everyone’s surprise, a new Kendrick Lamar album has found its way onto streaming services for their ears to listen to. But with the new album released, Kendrick was still quiet, not posting many Instagram stories, tweeting to fans, or answering questions; he just let the music speak for itself. And this practice is something that many artists should practice.

Once an artist releases music to the general public, the music no longer belongs to them and is now in the hands of the listener. And the listener is allowed and must interpret their art in any way necessary to connect with the message the songs are trying to convey.

Another rather elusive artist is Childish Gambino. After the explosive success ofWake up, My Love!it looked like Gambino would use this momentum to release another batch of radio hits to attract more listeners. But alas, his last album, 3.15.20, had a very low-key rollout with hardly any promotions. Gambino just released the project and continued to remain silent. And there is something quite admirable in this process.

Maybe the reason artists staying quiet during their album release cycle is so appealing is because we live in a world where our attention is constantly being asked for? Or maybe because if an artist doesn’t post on social media, the public forgets about it and moves on to the next one? When an artist isn’t trying to solicit your attention, it almost feels like they respect our time as an audience and understand that they don’t need to do anything flashy or flashy. hateful for us to listen to his music.

Artists such as Frank Ocean and Kendrick Lamar have weathered silent droughts because their music stands the test of time and has great replay value, no matter how long they were interrupted. These artists always find themselves trending online because of the quality of their art. But maybe the reason audiences love elusive artists so much is because of the potential mystery of a new sound or artistic direction they’ll go in. And that uncertainty keeps people interested and wondering what’s going to happen next.

It seems that the more social media posting becomes a necessity to market music, the more artists are reluctant. The demands of constantly marketing your art on social media is exhausting, especially when all an artist wants to do is release music for people to hear. And there’s some confusion when an artist can just release music without a lot of marketing or promotion, and it’s still booming. There seems to be this romance of life before the social media renaissance, and artists were able to put out a record, go on tour, and weren’t asked to constantly promote themselves via viral internet trends. .

A few weeks ago, a TikTok video made the rounds of the pop singer Halsey stating that she has a new song she wants to release, but her record label is forcing her to create TikTok content so the song can be a viral hit before it ever gets streamed. In the video, she expresses her frustration with her record label and insists that all she wants to do is release the song. And as an audience, you can see the exhaustion in his eyes and you can really feel that times have changed in this digital landscape. It almost seems like there’s little demand for real art, and all the label wants from artists is to add flame to the internet fire.

It is also essential to know that artists who play the social media game can effectively market their music in digital spaces. Both Lil Nas X and Doja Cat are incredibly popular due to their clever and successful tactics of marketing their music on TikTok, Instagram, and other social media platforms. They can generate buzz for a music release long before the music is finished, which is a skill few artists possess today. And at the same time, they can release unique and very personal music that resonates with audiences around the world. But this method of constant content creation isn’t for all artists, and we as an audience shouldn’t demand it.

Is there a clear solution to this problem of burnt-out artists in an ever-changing industry that demands constant content creation? No. But hopefully the content creation bubble will eventually burst and the artist’s elusive and mysterious formula will one day be the desired method.

As long as there is a demand for new music, new marketing tactics and tools will always be in demand, especially in times when an artist’s job is to make more money for the label. However, there is hope for a future where the music industry believes in artists and trusts their vision, allowing them to let their art speak for itself.

After all, as audiences, we let the music speak for ourselves when we can’t find the right words to say. Whether we are sad, angry or in love, a song can express our emotions louder than our voice. And we should respect artists who don’t want to talk as much as they want to sing.

Photo credit: Adam Blyweiss











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Retrospective a chance to look back in wonder at the art of Colin Davidson https://russellchatham.com/retrospective-a-chance-to-look-back-in-wonder-at-the-art-of-colin-davidson/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 00:12:11 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/retrospective-a-chance-to-look-back-in-wonder-at-the-art-of-colin-davidson/ ORGANIZING a retrospective could annoy some artists. Not Colin Davidson whose retrospective exhibition, Selected Paintings 1986-2022, at the FE McWilliam Gallery in Banbridge also looks to the future. “No, it’s not getting old,” insists the 53-year-old. “It made me aware of a natural progression in the work and there are hints of what could happen. […]]]>

ORGANIZING a retrospective could annoy some artists. Not Colin Davidson whose retrospective exhibition, Selected Paintings 1986-2022, at the FE McWilliam Gallery in Banbridge also looks to the future.

“No, it’s not getting old,” insists the 53-year-old. “It made me aware of a natural progression in the work and there are hints of what could happen. I would like to do the same thing in 20 or 30 years.”

Probably the artist best known for his portraits began by painting cityscapes. A series of tributes to Belfast occupy the first third of the exhibition and in a way they are also portraits.

“Yes, that’s absolutely correct,” he said. “It’s really interesting how I’ve mapped the city, which is a living, breathing thing, over the years.”

The first painting, Derelict Belfast Street (1986), shows a row of condemned houses. Yet the palette is warm, even tender, with a lot of pink, so the terrace is almost pretty.

“I was seventeen and it was an old run-down street that was about to be demolished. That was what the city looked like back then,” he says.

“But although I painted what was really there, I wanted to give it importance, dignity.”

During one of the private views, a friend of Davidson’s exclaimed at the skill of the small canvas.

Next to it is a large painting, Scrabo from Europa, Belfast (2003-2004). The familiar view, with the Crown Bar in front of you, has changed, becoming lighter, dreamlike. The color of the old gin palace is not brown, but pale cream and green.

Davidson comments on the technique, “Although there is 20 years difference between the paintings, they are somehow related. It’s something you fall into with an odd perspective.”

When it came to getting a vantage point to paint Queen’s University, the artist used a drone for the first time: “Normally I would be above view, but there was no nowhere to anchor me. So I contacted a drone expert who took a few hits.”

The resulting view of Lanyon’s majestic greenhouse and Queen’s red-brick buildings is affectionate. Yet Davidson makes it clear that he maintains an accuracy with regard to the buildings, built environment and foliage that softens the edges of some of his paintings of Belfast.

“I try to be topographically correct,” he says.

“These are my views instead of a painting with fluffy clouds and sheep in the fields. This is my Irish landscape.”

A sequence of canvases, many in acrylic rather than oil, that leave out fluffy clouds is Davidson’s work on the streets of London and Belfast.

Interestingly, the two cities merge: the speed, the interaction in cafes and the sense of life lived at a fast pace are the same. Stylistically, Davidson included lots of window displays and storefronts.

“The subject was not so much the street as the sheet of glass which could be the same in different places. I was capturing the (view) refracted through a sheet of glass.”

He adds that there is a frenetic side to the images. The genius of a big city encompasses Leicester Square and a recognizable cash machine behind the Town Hall in Donegall Square South. Among the scenes is Malone, a primary color blue with the outline of a bus, suggesting speed.

Next, you encounter one of Colin Davidson’s new 3D portraits. It’s a bit surprising because of the scale, but also noble for the same reason, and packed in a wooden frame. There is a reflection, maybe even a touch of sadness in the big blue eyes.

Davidson counters, “It’s your point of view, everyone brings something of themselves to the art. The viewer completes the picture in their own way, but that’s the opposite of an ego-trip.”

There is also, naturally, a section of the gallery devoted to large-scale portraits of Colin Davidson. He started working in this format when he painted Duke Special, and the 2010 painting is there. The musician has an off-center look in a visionary way.

Not far away is Davidson’s portrait of Queen Elizabeth. You can’t help but wonder if it’s harder to capture a paint sitter who’s done this many times before and knows the form.

“We all have protective facades in public but I’ve had the privilege of seeing behind it,” says Davidson.

“I asked for two hours and the Palace was really surprised how long I wanted because some artists come in and take pictures to use. But I like to see how people move when they talk.

“You also have to have a good likeness, and she’s a woman with one of the most famous faces in the world.”

The result is superbly recognizable. Two preliminary sketches, one in pencil of a serious woman, the other a smiling face, are as alluring as the incredible Renaissance master drawings in the Buckingham Palace collection.

There’s a hall of fame nearby made up of preliminary sketches of the greats and good ones that Davidson has immortalized, with Brad Pitt, Edna O’Brien and Ciarán Hinds in the line-up.

The Irish actor looks distinctive here. Davidson says, “There is something ancient, Greek or Roman, about Ciarán Hinds, a unique, rather wondrous and beautiful appearance.

“You assume things about a person as a result, but when I met him I found him to be a kind and interested person.”

Among the heroes Davidson has pinned to the canvas is Seamus Heaney, looking bardic and turned towards the final chapter: “I loved his poetry from childhood and it was a privilege to paint him. He even made us a cup of tea. Unfortunately, this turned out to be his last portrait.”

Another face that seems aware of the passage of time is that of artist Basil Blackshaw. “He was someone I looked up to,” Davidson says. “It shows him in the last years of his life.”

The running time of the new Chancellor of Ulster University is fulfilling and records the passage of time, in people and places.

Dr. Riann Coulter, Director of the FE McWilliam Gallery and Studio and co-curator of the exhibition alongside Kim Mawhinney, Senior Curator at National Museums NI, says, “I think of Colin as a storyteller. When Kim, who is close to the artist, and I were planning the exhibit, we had to decide what stories we wanted to tell.”

They felt that Davidson’s famous Troubled portraits, Silent Testimony, had had good coverage and had taken the Northern Irish narrative overseas.

“So we focused on landscapes and some portraits,” she says. “I wouldn’t say there’s exactly a romantic approach, but there is a sweetness.”

:: Colin Davidson: Selected Paintings 1986-2022 is on view at the FE McWilliam Gallery and Studio, Banbridge until 10 September. femcwilliam.com, 028 4062 3322.

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The female gaze takes center stage through art – The New Indian Express https://russellchatham.com/the-female-gaze-takes-center-stage-through-art-the-new-indian-express/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 02:02:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/the-female-gaze-takes-center-stage-through-art-the-new-indian-express/ Express press service Women – and their bodies – have long been objectified and depicted in art from a man’s point of view. In fact, English art critic John Berger devoted an entire chapter of his 1972 book Ways of Seeing to demonstrating how the male gaze works. “Men act and women appear. Men look […]]]>

Express press service

Women – and their bodies – have long been objectified and depicted in art from a man’s point of view. In fact, English art critic John Berger devoted an entire chapter of his 1972 book Ways of Seeing to demonstrating how the male gaze works. “Men act and women appear. Men look at women. Women watch themselves being watched,” he wrote.

In an attempt to transform such representation – it has plagued literature, art and film – Yasha Shrivastava (29) creates digital illustrations that explore ideas of female sexuality and desire from a female gaze . Her Instagram account (@earthy_folk), on which Shrivastava uploads these digital works, has gradually taken the form of a micro-blog. “In a society where women are considered the second sex and have had to endure and accept cultural norms throughout history, I want to use my art to advance the female gaze,” she says.

Make a powerful statement

Shrivastava – she graduated from the College of Arts, Mandi House, and is currently pursuing her research in Madhya Pradesh – often juxtaposes her self-portraits with doodles in an effort to create a feminist statement. This fusion serves its purpose of illuminating discourses on sexuality and gender. “The body has always meant liberation for me. I identify a lot with the final piece,” she says.

The idea of ​​self-acceptance and self-love is often a central theme in her work. Scroll through her images and you’ll find one where Shrivastava can be seen standing in a room with the door ajar. In this work, figures of five nude female subjects were added digitally by the artist. “This [juxtaposing photographs with illustrations] is an unconscious thought. It helps me to inhabit an imaginary landscape, one where everything is possible. It also explains my identity and the way I see the world as an artist.

The artist’s illustrations, often erotic, can be seen as conscious and artful attempts “to explore sexuality, empower women, and challenge taboos in the representation of sexuality.” In this sense, her work is definitely feminist but not sexist. By working on erotic art – she is inspired by Chinese and Japanese eroticism – Shrivastava strives to “manifest emotions, thoughts, feelings and self-observations outwardly”.

Immerse yourself in an indigenous philosophy

Remnants of indigenous and folk arts can be seen in Shrivastava’s work. Example: an image of the artist has been scribbled with symbolic stick figures in tribal art. A black and white color palette dominates in his works. “With the black and white scheme, I feel like I can express my thoughts better. It allows for spontaneity,” she concludes.

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This new documentary explores the difficult life of Sinéad O’Connor https://russellchatham.com/this-new-documentary-explores-the-difficult-life-of-sinead-oconnor/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 13:41:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/this-new-documentary-explores-the-difficult-life-of-sinead-oconnor/ Kathryn Ferguson tells AnOther about her new film, Nothing Compares, which charts the meteoric rise of a young Dublin woman who was revered to stardom but quickly reviled in exile June 21, 2022 In 1992, Kris Kristofferson presented Sinead O’Connor on stage at a Bob Dylan 30th birthday concert. “I’m very proud to introduce this […]]]>

Kathryn Ferguson tells AnOther about her new film, Nothing Compares, which charts the meteoric rise of a young Dublin woman who was revered to stardom but quickly reviled in exile


In 1992, Kris Kristofferson presented Sinead O’Connor on stage at a Bob Dylan 30th birthday concert. “I’m very proud to introduce this next artist,” he said. “An artist synonymous with courage and integrity.” She walked slowly across the stage as the crowd erupted in an overwhelming, jarring concoction of cheers and boos. “It was the weirdest fucking noise I’ve ever heard in my life,” says O’Connor, while narrating a new documentary about his life, Nothing compares. “It made me want to vomit.”

This event came just 13 days after its infamous Saturday Night Live appearance, in which she ripped a photo of the pope over an impassioned, impromptu version of War of Bob Marley, declaring “fighting the real enemy” to an audience full of people stunned into silence. This moment of protest, in response to child sexual abuse in the Catholic Church, is a defining moment in the film, which covers a six-year period (1987-1993) covering the meteoric rise of a young woman from Dublin to the pop star and activist who was revered in mega-stardom but quickly reviled in exile.

For director Kathryn Ferguson, whom we caught up with after the film’s European premiere at CPH:DOX in Copenhagen, O’Connor represented positivity growing up. “I was a bona fide fan,” she says. “I loved everything about her, what she stood for, her looks, her words, her boldness and what she meant to a young girl growing up in 80s and 90s Belfast. Things were to say the least. a little dark there, with the Troubles still brewing in the North and the Catholic Church still very influential in the South, she represented hope. We all needed it.”

In the context of contemporary popular music, where political statements are relatively common – often to the point of being performative, dishonest or a form of marketing manipulation – the film paints a very different landscape via the music industry of the 1990s. filled with coldness, hostility, rampant sexism and a cruel disregard for sanity; a time and place where talking about such horrific incidents, and since proven to be true, was not necessarily welcomed as brave or important, but often downplayed. “The media has always made me look like a lunatic,” O’Connor says in the documentary.

In the wake of the SNL moment Frank Sinatra and actor Joe Pesci both threatened physical violence against her, she was mocked in prime-time comedy sketches, including by Madonna, and her records were crushed by steamrollers at the Rockefeller Center headquarters of Chrysalis Records in New York. The deep-seated hatred towards her was such in some corners that an American television pundit shouted during an interview: “In the case of Sinéad O’Connor, child abuse was justified.”

The core of the film hits home the deeply fickle nature of fame and fame, and the sexist “stay in your lane” mentality that underlies much of it. In just two years, O’Connor went from being the hottest performer at the 1989 Grammy Awards to being ridiculed and lambasted by parts of that same audience. The whole world had fallen in love with a woman who shed a tear in the video for the global hit Nothing compares to 2 Ubut was quite indifferent to the reasons which may have caused it.

This all follows an extraordinarily tough life that O’Connor had already lived. Her voice became a crutch from an early age when she was abused by her mother at home. “I was able to soothe him with my voice,” O’Connor says. “I succeeded in putting the devil to sleep.” When she talks briefly about the song Troywriting about her childhood experiences of being locked out of the house and forced to sleep in the garden for weeks, she describes it as “not a song, it’s a fucking testament”.

The film explores how deep and multifaceted O’Connor’s traumatic experience from childhood was, which made his journey to pop stardom all the more difficult and often confusing. “The reason I got into music was for therapy,” she says. “That’s why it was such a shock for me to become a pop star. It’s not what I wanted. I just wanted to scream.

Things didn’t necessarily get any easier because O’Connor became a hit. Her records were banned from American radio stations when she took a stand against the broadcast of the national anthem during a concert in 1990. When she became pregnant at age 20, her label encouraged an abortion and refused to have her photographed in the press photos showing that she was pregnant. “It’s out of the question for me to keep my mouth shut,” she said. “I am a beaten child and the whole world will know it. As they will know for all the other battered children. They won’t be able to silence us just because they don’t want to hear about it.

O’Connor’s unwavering belief in her beliefs and the often unforgiving landscape she had to contend with cost her dearly, both professionally and personally, and Ferguson got to see it up close. “She never wavered,” she said. “We’ve watched hundreds of hours of footage and she’s one of the most consistent humans I’ve ever met. She’s rock solid.

From a shaved head to her distinct sense of fashion and the topics she spoke about with such passion, from child abuse to abortion rights, the film portrays O’Connor as a sort of prototype of the figure of the pop artist as an activist, paving the way for future generations of young women. Contributors such as Kathleen Hanna from Bikini Kill, Peaches and Skin from Skunk Anansie all consider her a trailblazer and an outlier.

“She was way ahead of her time,” Ferguson says. “And in many ways, an isolated voice – or certainly an unsupported voice. There seemed to be an overriding attitude that she should just shut up and sing. Here’s this superstar with seemingly everything – the talent, the looks, the success – but the fact that she also had a very strong point of view and wanted to be heard on nasty topics seemed like too much desire for some. . The film’s most poignant line comes from a defiant O’Connor herself who quietly but proudly declares, “They tried to bury me. They didn’t realize I was a seed.

The impact of O’Connor’s treatment reverberated and even shaped a young Ferguson herself. “I felt very demoralized when I was a teenager when I saw how she was treated,” she says. “I think that feeling planted the seed for this movie. It was bad in 1992 and I was still feeling the repercussions of it when we started writing the movie in 2018. I’m still furious about it and hope audiences feel the same.

Nothing compares will have its UK premiere and screen multiple times at Sheffield Doc/Fest from June 24-27, 2022.

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A community in the making for 20 years https://russellchatham.com/a-community-in-the-making-for-20-years/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 22:04:23 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/a-community-in-the-making-for-20-years/ Two decades ago, painter Lisa Fox took a leap of faith and opened Leiper’s Creek Gallery at a vacant gas station in Leiper’s Fork, Tennessee. About 30 miles south of Nashville, Leiper’s Fork is a small thoroughfare that’s home to an impressive array of art galleries, retail stores, Leiper’s Fork Spaand a historic grocery store […]]]>

Two decades ago, painter Lisa Fox took a leap of faith and opened Leiper’s Creek Gallery at a vacant gas station in Leiper’s Fork, Tennessee. About 30 miles south of Nashville, Leiper’s Fork is a small thoroughfare that’s home to an impressive array of art galleries, retail stores, Leiper’s Fork Spaand a historic grocery store and concert hall, Fox and Locke (formerly Puckett’s of Leiper’s Fork). You won’t find any big hotels or big box stores here – Leiper’s Fork is an enclave for arts and outdoor adventure, with culture and history loved by locals. Lisa Fox’s vision for Leiper’s Creek Gallery has been instrumental in the development of this small but mighty community.

As you enter the gallery, you’ll find lounge-style hanging artwork to create vibrant juxtapositions between the gallery’s stable of 25 artists, while Robin Rains stately and comfortable furnishings give a feeling of home. Fox intentionally built the gallery’s collection to be eclectic, believing this makes the space welcoming to all. “I had gone to galleries where I felt judged on whether or not I should be there, and I was determined that this gallery would be more than that,” she says. Its mix of local, national and international talent has become the basis for visionary local collaboration. Meet this week’s FACE of Nashville, Lisa Fox!

Please welcome Lisa Fox from Leiper’s Creek Galleryour new Nashville FACE!

How did the idea for Leiper’s Creek Gallery come about?

I was a freelance decorative artist commissioned to paint a mural at [local preservationist] Aubrey Preston’s mother’s house circa 1998. It was an old landscape on four walls, all around. It took six months, and I fell in love with this place and didn’t want to leave. I saw what Aubrey wanted to do here and believed in the dream. A handful of us dug in and committed.

How did you build an audience?

The struggle was to bring people here for the first time. If we could get them out once, we could get them back. Beyond gallery openings, we tried weird, quirky, funny and creative things to attract media coverage. We didn’t have a penny to market. The pictures were always great because it was a visual feast.

We had Derby Day hat-making parties and a bluegrass festival that drew 6,000 to 8,000 people every year for five years. We had old-fashioned sinks on the lawn where people could wash their hands, and a four-foot square ice block with a giant fan cooled people off. We pushed hard for seven or eight years until we started to feel, They come back again.

How did you select the first artists in the gallery?

I appealed to successful artists who attracted others. One was Antoine Weiss, who had founded several art societies in Nashville and was a highly accomplished master of abstraction. He was also my mentor. Then other artists of the same stature agreed to enter. I also delved into extremes, from impressionism to abstraction – I love contrast. I added folk and sculpture to it; they were all so different, but they went together. Mixing collections can be more interesting than having a house full of abstract art or landscapes.

Exterior of Leiper's Creek Gallery

“The juxtaposition of the gallery with the place attracts people’s attention. It’s so organic it’s real. This community of people made it possible,” says Lisa.

Interior of Leiper's Creek Gallery

“My stable has stayed strong because when I bring them in, it’s a partnership,” Lisa tells us of her collaborations with artists.

How do you continue to identify the artists you wish to represent?

It’s been so organic over the years. I don’t invite people until I know if it’s okay. For instance, PE Favor manufactures sculptural wooden pieces. I found it in the woods once, at one point I felt tired and exhausted. I took my dog ​​and was going somewhere where there wouldn’t be another human being. Went to Harpeth River and cut some brush and sticks. When I got to the river, to this little opening, my dog ​​was running around. Then I saw another dog running with her, and this man appeared. I’m not a scared cat, but damn it. Our dogs were doing figure eights and he was laughing. I took a deep breath and we started talking. He was an illustrator and had worked for The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. That night he sent me pictures and my jaw dropped. He had about 10 pieces hanging in his house – they had never seen the light of day. I gave him a show and we sold seven plays. I’m the only one who wears his work. That’s how these things happened.

I also remember when Maggie Siner called and asked if I would be interested in wearing his work. I almost fell off my chair. She is a master painter and such a great teacher. It was a moment when I thought, Alright, I’m getting there.

How are you celebrating the gallery’s 20th anniversary?

It’s an affirmation to have a vision and stick to it no matter what. I look back and think of the number of years I’ve been anxious, questioning, Am I on the right track? Am I doing the right thing? Am I doing enough? But I kept my head down and pushed. I had this belief that I was not a business-oriented person, but I actually am – with common sense about how to do things – and it surprises me. I trust where the gallery is and where I can take it. It’s solid and it’s not going anywhere.

Year-round we host exhibits on the porch, where we hang artwork outside the building and feature one of our artists. We have live music and food, and it’s just a big fun time. We do one a month until Demonstration PAPSE (Plein Air Painters of the South-East) end of September. There will be a big party at the end for the gallery. Peter Trippi, the editor of Fine Art Connoisseur, will speak at the Lawnchair Theater [on the gallery lawn] and include views on Tennessee Land Trust, Nashville’s Great Backyard, and how painters paint this landscape.

Artwork by Lisa Fox

Besides other prominent artists, you can find Lisa’s work at Leiper’s Creek Gallery.

Artwork by Lisa Fox

i like how [art] makes you feel, and I love when we’re part of that connection between the art and the customer,” says Lisa. “I probably cherish those experiences more than anything, because connecting with a piece is priceless.”

Are there any artists in the gallery now that you are particularly passionate about?

One of our painters, Roger Dale Brown, born and raised in Nashville, rose through the ranks very, very quickly. He is a four time master painter and probably the one a lot of people look up to. He paints really big, and he keeps growing and growing.

Why do you think owning original artwork is important?

Years ago a man walked into the gallery, looked around, and said, “I have empty walls. I need you to choose some artwork and bring it to my house. I took a deep breath and asked him, ‘Would you like to get out in the middle of this road and just shout, hey, everyone who wants to come home and live with me, come on!’ A true work of art has an energy that you either feel or not. And if you feel it, and you take it home and be your friend, it will be part of your life, your history and your family. It marks a point in time and raises a space. You can feel it. I love that.

What is the most important piece of advice you have ever given or received?

Leap and the net will appear!

Besides faith, friends, and family, what are three things you can’t live without?

Coffee, woodwinds and immersion in the arts in all their forms – visual, musical and otherwise.

Thank you Lisa! All photographs provided.

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Read more interviews with our inspiring FACES in our archive!

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Fifteen NFT Art Gallery presents a new exhibition: Reclaim https://russellchatham.com/fifteen-nft-art-gallery-presents-a-new-exhibition-reclaim/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 13:33:11 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/fifteen-nft-art-gallery-presents-a-new-exhibition-reclaim/ Enter Wall Street with StreetInsider Premium. Claim your one week free trial here. NEW YORK, June 17, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Fifteen, an NFT art gallery, web3 hub and artist co-working space, is proud to present Retrievea new art exhibition taking place on June 24 at Fifteen Gallery, located in the heart of Soho at […]]]>

Enter Wall Street with StreetInsider Premium. Claim your one week free trial here.


NEW YORK, June 17, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Fifteen, an NFT art gallery, web3 hub and artist co-working space, is proud to present Retrievea new art exhibition taking place on June 24 at Fifteen Gallery, located in the heart of Soho at 76 Wooster St, New York.

Reclaim features the captivating photos of four young women, including Alena Frolova, Beatriz Santana, Ella Petrushko and Elena Azzaro. Photos are printed on stretched canvas and come with an NFT in the form of digital certificates and proof of ownership.

The exhibition aims to empower women and serve as a platform to share their stories through their recovered photographs.

The project was inspired by the fact that we live in a world where individuals have no power over the use of their own image. Given the current state of copyright laws, models often have no rights or control over photographs taken of them and then used for profit.

Retrieve makes a statement against this convoluted system, allowing these women to take back control of their imagery and portray their stories through works of art.

Hosted by the models of Reclaim, this intimate show promises to be one of the most exclusive events of the NFT.NYC week, with a highly selected guest list. Only 100 tickets are available to the public. Ticket cost starts at 1 ETH and can be purchased at recovery Where here . All artworks and NFTs in the collection will be auctioned online.

As part of its ongoing efforts to effect social change, Fifteen will also donate 15% of event proceeds to a nonprofit organization dedicated to women’s reproductive health and rights.

Exhibition information:

Retrieve will take place on June 24 from 7 p.m. at 11 p.m. The gallery is located at 76 Wooster St in the Soho neighborhood of New York. For more information about the exhibition and the gallery, visit 15.art or email [email protected]

about fifteen

Fifteen is an artist community, NFT art gallery, web3 hub and coworking space that fosters the next generation of digital creativity. The space is meant to open a doorway to the metaverse, blurring the lines between the physical and digital spheres of art and influence. It provides a unique platform for artists to express themselves, own the rights to their expressions, and create new channels of value.

With the power of smart contracts, a new paradigm of artist ownership is emerging. Provenance, royalties and history are programmed in, changing the landscape of how artists control ownership of their intellectual property. The first entity of its kind, Fifteen’s mission is to bring artists together and evolve digital creativity into a sustainable form.

This content was published via the newswire.com press release distribution service.

Source: Fifteen

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Art fraudster who won nearly £500,000 in fake ‘Turner’ painting scam is found after 13 years https://russellchatham.com/art-fraudster-who-won-nearly-500000-in-fake-turner-painting-scam-is-found-after-13-years/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 21:00:20 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/art-fraudster-who-won-nearly-500000-in-fake-turner-painting-scam-is-found-after-13-years/ Art fraudster, 73, who made nearly £500,000 from fake ‘Turner’ painting scam is found after 13 years on the run and now faces extradition to US Angela Hamblin, 73, faces extradition from Germany for selling fake paintings In 2009, she was sentenced to a year in prison in the United States, but she fled the […]]]>

Art fraudster, 73, who made nearly £500,000 from fake ‘Turner’ painting scam is found after 13 years on the run and now faces extradition to US

  • Angela Hamblin, 73, faces extradition from Germany for selling fake paintings
  • In 2009, she was sentenced to a year in prison in the United States, but she fled the country
  • Fraudster was arrested in Frankfurt on her way home to Scotland

A British art fraudster who has been on the run for 13 years faces extradition to the US after he is finally arrested.

Angela Hamblin, 73, is now likely to serve her 12-month sentence in the US for earning nearly £500,000 passing off fake paintings as being by Turner and other artists.

She pleaded guilty in New York in 2009 but became a wanted woman after she disappeared.

She is being held in Germany after officials acted under an international arrest warrant when she stopped in Frankfurt on a flight from Vienna to Edinburgh.

After her arrest, the Daily Mail traced her journey to the Scottish Borders village of St Boswells, where she lived quietly.

British art fraudster Angela Hamblin (pictured) was arrested in Frankfurt on a flight back to Edinburgh, after 13 years on the run from the US to Frankfurt

Hamblin is said to be selling fake artworks claiming they are originals by artists including JMW Turner, Milton Avery and Juan Gris (pictured)

Hamblin is said to be selling fake artworks claiming they are originals by artists including JMW Turner, Milton Avery and Juan Gris (pictured)

Hamblin attempted to sell counterfeit art privately and on eBay when she and her husband, a professor at one of America’s Ivy League universities, lived in Revere, Massachusetts in 2007. She made pass the cheap decorative art for works by JMW Turner, the expressionist Franz Kline. , the landscape painter Milton Avery and the Spanish cubist Juan Gris.

But she was arrested in a sting after US prosecutors were alerted to her activities. Prosecutors said the sale was “by no means an isolated incident.”

They added: “She had been carrying out her plan for years. She continued her fraud relentlessly. After discovering that the paintings were fake, buyers regularly demanded their money back.

“The few times Hamblin would refund money, she would resell the painting.”

In court, prosecutors requested up to 41 months in prison. Hamblin told the judge she turned to fraud because of the financial strain of paying the mortgage on their house in Revere.

After denying the charges, she eventually pleaded guilty to two counts of mail fraud and one count of wire fraud. Wire fraud covers crimes using electronic communications such as email and telephone.

In a defense brief, Hamblin’s attorney said she appeared in court as a “broken and humiliated woman” and that the case was a “nightmare from which she cannot wake.”

She was present for her sentencing in July 2009 when she was jailed for a year and a day, but did not turn up in September as ordered.

It is unclear how she managed to get out of the United States because she was forced to surrender her passport.

The people of St Boswells were shocked to learn she was a fugitive. Alex Gilham, bartender at the nearby Buccleuch Arms, regularly serves the couple.

He said: “They are very eccentric. She’s really outgoing, they’re crazy in their own way but they’re really adorable.

“It doesn’t surprise me that she could have done anything unusual, they’re not really the type to have a desk job.”

But another resident who asked not to be named said Hamblin was a ‘difficult woman’ adding: ‘She seems to have a big imagination with some of the things she told us. She’s very good at dropping names.

Hamblin’s husband had no comment.

Additional reporting: Rob Hyde in Bremen, Germany

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A look back at Vivian Browne’s transition to abstraction https://russellchatham.com/a-look-back-at-vivian-brownes-transition-to-abstraction/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 21:33:13 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/a-look-back-at-vivian-brownes-transition-to-abstraction/ The eight paintings and five works on paper that make up Vivian Browne: Africa Series 1971-1974Browne’s second solo exhibition at the RYAN LEE Gallery, was prompted by the artist’s first trip to West Africa in 1971. At the time of her visit, the Florida-born, New York-based figurative painter and printmaker York, then in his forties, […]]]>

The eight paintings and five works on paper that make up Vivian Browne: Africa Series 1971-1974Browne’s second solo exhibition at the RYAN LEE Gallery, was prompted by the artist’s first trip to West Africa in 1971. At the time of her visit, the Florida-born, New York-based figurative painter and printmaker York, then in his forties, was at the end of his first major body of work: more than 100 pathetic and grotesque paintings and drawings little men, all white. While working on this scathing light-eyed series, Browne was also toiling away from the studio, pushing for a fairer world. A founding member of the Black Emergency Cultural Coalition (BECC), Browne participated in protests against grossly exclusive exhibitions at the Whitney Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1968 and 1969 that did not include works by black artists; in 1972, she became co-director of the BECC. She was also an integral part of Where we area collective formed in 1971 by black women artists interested in creating a support network.

Vivian Browne, “Benin Beauty” (1971), watercolor and ink, 17 3/4 x 24 inches

A number of diaspora artists involved in the Black Arts Movement in the United States visited Africa in the 1970s, including notables such as Faith Ringgold and Howardena Pindell. For Browne, who was particularly interested in studying Nigerian and Ghanaian sculpture, the trip – an extended six-week stay at the University of Ibadan in Nigeria with additional trips to places like Benin and Ghana – was remarkably generative, spawning the Africa series, his second major body of work. Browne has cited the influence of environmental, emotional, and soundscapes on his practice, and has also produced paintings relating to time spent in China and California. However, her experience in West Africa “has been such an emotional uplift”, she told artist Emma Amos (quoted by Dr Leslie King-Hammond in the current exhibition catalog), that he pushed her to lean towards abstraction, as if figuration alone were too fragile a container for the extent of her joy.

Vivian Browne, “Assistant to the Chief” (c. 1973), acrylic on canvas, 52 3/4 x 64 3/4 inches

The bodies do not disappear in these works, but rather materialize in many forms, from a trio of easily identifiable planar women in “The Bathers” (1971) (probably a nod to Paul Cézanne, whom Browne greatly admired ) to a gallimaufry featuring a mask-like face, disembodied arm, Carthusian phallus, and fragmented horse in the large “Chief’s Assistant” (c. 1973), to a plunging orange C-curve with a single eye from another world in another large-scale acrylic, “The Chief Attendant” (circa 1972). Browne had already established herself as a colorist, but in the Africa series, she introduced an even bolder palette. While the drawings and prints on display, including the greyscale gouache and ink depiction of the bathers, are relatively subdued, the paintings are tinged with fuchsia, lime, papaya and aquamarine. ; often she opted for acrylic instead of oil so that she could paint faster. Whatever the medium, the patterns flourish: the works on display are full of bands of zigzags, wavy lines, polka dots, checks and even irregular rows of what look like tiny eyes, alluding to depth and depth. range of visual stimuli Browne experienced on his travels.

Vivian Browne, “Abstract Forest” (1974), oil on canvas, 22 1/2 x 20 3/4 inches

Anticipating the depictions of trees that would occupy the artist in his final decade, flora and fauna abound. Vegetation encountered by Browne appears in a variety of forms: as a repeated decorative leaf pattern in “Diversities” (1973), energetic arcing lines in “Umbrella Plant” (1971), and flat green blocks in “Shango Kingdom” (1972) . In ‘Abstract Forest’ (1974), an oil painting smaller in size and darker in hue than its acrylic counterparts, an enigmatically twilight, loosely patterned, entirely brown-green darkness is dotted with vines wandering; to the left of the frame, a band of orange diamonds reads like reptilians, evoking vipers and vipers. The notions often linked to landscape painting — from adherence to manifest destiny to the imposition of an exotic vision — are absent here. Instead, this quietly inexhaustible little painting is rich ground in which to get lost.

Vivian Browne: Africa Series 1971-1974 continues at the RYAN LEE Gallery (515 West 26th Street, Chelsea, Manhattan) through July 1. The exhibition was organized by the gallery.

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