Landscape Artist Wage – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ Mon, 19 Jul 2021 09:46:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://russellchatham.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2.png Landscape Artist Wage – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ 32 32 Vehicles crash into Fayette County ditches and split http://russellchatham.com/vehicles-crash-into-fayette-county-ditches-and-split/ http://russellchatham.com/vehicles-crash-into-fayette-county-ditches-and-split/#respond Tue, 06 Jul 2021 15:21:06 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/vehicles-crash-into-fayette-county-ditches-and-split/ The Fayette County Sheriff’s Office is investigating 2 traffic accidents in which vehicles ended up in ditches, smashing utility poles. The first was reported at around 10:45 p.m. on Friday, July 2, when the Sheriff received a call to 911, reporting a vehicle in the ditch in the 3000 block of Rose Road, 800 meters […]]]>

The Fayette County Sheriff’s Office is investigating 2 traffic accidents in which vehicles ended up in ditches, smashing utility poles.


The first was reported at around 10:45 p.m. on Friday, July 2, when the Sheriff received a call to 911, reporting a vehicle in the ditch in the 3000 block of Rose Road, 800 meters west of Oelwein.

A sport utility vehicle driven by Melissa Spicer, 36, of Oelwein, was heading east when she lost control. The Jeep moved on the road, entered the ditch, struck a utility pole, causing the vehicle to roll. He ended up in a dried up stream. The utility pole was snapped in half, knocking down power lines and temporarily cutting off power in the area. Spicer, as well as two minors in the vehicle, were seriously injured. They were taken to MercyOne Hospital in Oelwein.

Strong vehicle. Fayette County Sheriff’s Photo

The other crash happened at around 10:45 p.m. Sunday (July 4), on Cedar Road, about 3 miles south of Elgin. Loren Strong, 36, of Elgin, was driving north when he lost control and plunged into the ditch. The vehicle struck a telephone pole, splitting it in two. The 2020 Chrysler Van has been totaled. Strong was taken to West Union Hospital for treatment with minor injuries.

Both accidents are still under investigation.

LOOK: The most unusual and wonderful attractions of Route 66, state by state

Stacker compiled a list of 50 attractions – state by state – to see along the way, drawing on information from historic sites, newspaper articles, America roadside, and the National Park Service. Read on to find out where travelers can have fun on Route 66.

How many in America: from guns to ghost towns

Can you guess how many public schools there are in the United States? Do you have any idea how many billionaires might reside there? Read on to find out, and learn a thing or two about the cultural significance and legacy of each of these selections along the way.

]]>
http://russellchatham.com/vehicles-crash-into-fayette-county-ditches-and-split/feed/ 0
The first “Champions of Change” winners unveiled as the next phase of the Vital 50 Best for Recovery program http://russellchatham.com/the-first-champions-of-change-winners-unveiled-as-the-next-phase-of-the-vital-50-best-for-recovery-program/ http://russellchatham.com/the-first-champions-of-change-winners-unveiled-as-the-next-phase-of-the-vital-50-best-for-recovery-program/#respond Tue, 06 Jul 2021 09:00:00 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/the-first-champions-of-change-winners-unveiled-as-the-next-phase-of-the-vital-50-best-for-recovery-program/ Champions of Change, as part of the upcoming The World’s 50 Best Restaurants 2021 program, sponsored by S.Pellegrino & Acqua Panna, is a key pillar of the evolutionary initiative of the organization “50 Best for Recovery”. This year offers opportunities for positive change as the sector rebuilds and reshapes with a greater emphasis on inclusiveness […]]]>

Champions of Change, as part of the upcoming The World’s 50 Best Restaurants 2021 program, sponsored by S.Pellegrino & Acqua Panna, is a key pillar of the evolutionary initiative of the organization “50 Best for Recovery”. This year offers opportunities for positive change as the sector rebuilds and reshapes with a greater emphasis on inclusiveness and long-term sustainability, which is reflected in the powerful work of the winners. A substantial donation will be made to each of the causes of the 50 Best for Recovery Fund winners, allowing the recipients to continue building their initiatives and supporting long-term progress in the field of restoration and food.

The first of this year’s winners is Kurt evans – co-founder of Down North Pizza, a “for-profit, mission-run restaurant” in Philadelphia cream, United States, which exclusively employs formerly incarcerated people while providing culinary career opportunities with fair wages. In addition to throwing Detroit-style pizza, Down North aims to alleviate recidivism and end long-term mass incarceration. Evans is the leader and activist behind the hit ‘End Mass Incarceration’ dinner series, where families affected by mass incarceration come together with lawmakers and diners to strike up a conversation about prison reform around a multi-course meal.

He is also the co-founder of Everybody Eats Philly, a collaborative team of Black leaders in the fight against food insecurity in the city – an initiative born out of the pandemic. Evans will use the Champions of Change donation to help fund his End Mass Incarceration dinner series as well as further the work Everybody Eats Philly does to provide free meals and essentials to those in need.

Viviana Varese, who received a Michelin star for her Milanrestaurant Viva, becoming one of the very few women to Italy to do this, was also selected as Champion of Change. LGBTQ + and inclusive activist, following her own personal experiences of discrimination, Varese is also part of the non-profit organization Parabere Forum, aimed at empowering women in the hotel industry. Following the pandemic, Viviana reopened Viva in the spring of 2021, along with the new W Villadorata restaurant in Sicily, with a strong emphasis on the inclusion of staff regardless of gender, race, age or sexuality. In addition to employing and training farmers over 60 who have lost their jobs, she works with suppliers who employ people with disabilities to make her plates and pottery.

In the fall of 2021, Varese intends to open a new gelateria ice cream shop in Milan and specifically recruits and trains women who have been victims of domestic violence for the staff of the operation. Varese will use the Champions of Change donation to support this new retail project, which will provide much needed employment opportunities for vulnerable women.

When the pandemic struck Thailand, Deepanker Khosla, an Indian chief based in Bangkok, transformed its restaurant Haoma – whose staff is largely made up of migrants – into a soup kitchen for the unemployed Bangkok residents. He raised money to prepare meals with his campaign, No One Hungry, where his staff prepared free meals for the homeless and were also able to receive food for themselves and their families. Khosla employs people from Burma and Nepal who often lack citizenship and has successfully retained all of its staff despite the impact of the pandemic.

Haoma has also received a three-star certification from the sustainability organization Food Made Good and is on track to become zero waste by 2022. Khosla will use the Champions of Change donation to create and staff a full-fledged kitchen for the No One Hungry project, providing meals to thousands of people in need.

Guillaume Drew, Content Director for the World’s 50 Best Restaurants, said: “We are delighted to recognize Kurt, Viviana and Deepanker with the inaugural Champions of Change awards. Wait and see how they will use these donations to advance their exceptional projects. We are honored to salute the work they do and the example they set for the food industry and beyond. “

Stefano Bolognese, Director of Sanpellegrino’s International Business Unit, says: “Talent and human capital are the true heritage of every restaurant – assets that present a high risk of dispersion when uncertainty prevails, and therefore should be nurtured. and promoted. For this reason, we are proud to support the new Champions of Change initiative: the awards allow us to celebrate local heroes who, through their skills and creativity, positively contribute to the evolution of the gastronomy industry, offering a new opportunity to reflect on its strategic role within society. “

In 2020, 50 Best went from publishing its annual ranking and hosting live events to fundraising and supporting the hospitality industry through its 50 Best for Recovery program, which included the Fund raising $ 1.29 million with the support of its partners, including S.Pellegrino and Acqua Panna. 50 Best for Recovery has distributed grants to over 200 restaurants and bars and donated to a range of nonprofits in the food and beverage industry. Champions of Change is one of many special awards that will be announced by September, as part of the 2021 World’s 50 Best Restaurants event program. These people have used recent challenges as a catalyst for affirmative action and long, long-term progress, whether it’s helping others, improving the food industry, or creating a healthier planet.

Awards for the 50 best restaurants in the world 2021, sponsored by S.Pellegrino & Acqua Panna, will be hosted in the city of Antwerp in Flanders – the northern Flemish region of Belgium – Tuesday 5e October. Back after a year of hiatus, a vast program of events in Flanders will end with the Antwerp award ceremony, representing a key step in the continuous renewal of the restaurant industry.

50 best social media

About the 50 best restaurants in the world
Since 2002, the 50 best restaurants in the world have reflected the diversity of the global culinary landscape. The annual list of the world’s most prestigious restaurants offers an overview of some of the best destinations for unique dining experiences, in addition to being a barometer and a pioneer of global gastronomic trends.

The 50 Best family also includes Latin America 50 best restaurants, asia 50 best restaurants, 50 best bars in the world, asia 50 Best Bars, 50 Next and the # 50BestTalks series, all owned and managed by William Reed Business Media. 50 Best aims to bring communities in the hospitality industry together to foster collaboration, inclusiveness, diversity and discovery and contribute to positive change.

About the main sponsor: S.Pellegrino & Acqua Panna

S.Pellegrino and Acqua Panna are the main partners of the 50 best restaurants in the world and the 50 best restaurants. S.Pellegrino and Acqua Panna are the first natural mineral waters of world gastronomy. Together they interpret the Italian style all over the world as a synthesis of excellence, pleasure and well-being.

About the host destination: Flanders
Flanders is a small region where everything from delicious food to wonderful music takes craftsmanship to new levels. Cities of art like Antwerp, Bruges, Brussels, Ghent, Leuven and Mechelen are home to culinary delights, delicious chocolates and an endless variety of local and craft beers. You will find cutting edge design and fashion ahead of its time alongside ancient architecture. Its Flemish masters were experts in their craft, like Jan van Eyck, who revolutionized the techniques of oil painting. Get ready to live an experience: Flanders wants to share its secrets, its delicacies and its magni fi cation with everyone. www.visitflanders.com
Contact: Anita rampall, [email protected] ; +44 (0) 20 7299 3594

About the host city: Antwerp
Antwerp has a rich culinary tradition, where food and drink are elevated to true art forms. Its inhabitants love to eat and drink in the wide range of restaurants, cafes and bars that the city is home to. The multicultural cuisines which for centuries have found their way to Antwerp thanks to the port of the city and its immigrants allied to local specialties have created a gastronomy with fascinating and varied flavors. And while Antwerp perhaps famous as the diamond capital of the world, as a fashion icon and as an international port city, it can certainly stand out from other cities when it comes to food. www.visitantwerp.be
Contact: Dirk Vermeiren, [email protected], + 32 (0) 3338 84 81; +32 (0) 477 234 764

Other partners

  • Estrella Damm – Official beer partner, sponsor of the Estrella Damm Chefs’ Choice Award
  • American Express – Official partner of the credit card and reservation platform (Resy), sponsor of the American Express One To Watch Award
  • Nude Glass – Official partner of the glass industry, sponsor of the award for the best female chef in the world
  • Gin Mare – Official Gin Partner, sponsor of the Gin Mare Art of Hospitality Award
  • Flor de Caña – Official rum partner, sponsor of the Flor de Caña Sustainable Restaurant Award
  • Illycaffè – Official coffee partner
  • Beronia – Official partner of wines
  • Cinco Jotas – Official Partner of Iberian Ham
  • Nyetimber – Official Partner of Sparkling Wines
  • Aspire Lifestyles – Official Concierge Partner, Sponsor of the Highest New Entry Award

Photo – https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1557273/Champions_of_Change_winners.jpg
Logo – https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1557274/50_Best_Logo.jpg

SOURCE 50 Best

]]>
http://russellchatham.com/the-first-champions-of-change-winners-unveiled-as-the-next-phase-of-the-vital-50-best-for-recovery-program/feed/ 0
Two artists from the Vivid Matter collective collaborate on the new mural in Flo Ware Park http://russellchatham.com/two-artists-from-the-vivid-matter-collective-collaborate-on-the-new-mural-in-flo-ware-park/ http://russellchatham.com/two-artists-from-the-vivid-matter-collective-collaborate-on-the-new-mural-in-flo-ware-park/#respond Wed, 30 Jun 2021 17:58:17 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/two-artists-from-the-vivid-matter-collective-collaborate-on-the-new-mural-in-flo-ware-park/ by Mark Van Streefkerk There is a new mural facing Flo Ware Park on South Jackson Street that will bring even more light to the area this summer. On the exterior wall of the Seattle Girls’ School is “Find Yourself Outside,” a mural depicting black people in a Pacific Northwest landscape swimming, paddleboarding, dancing, camping […]]]>

by Mark Van Streefkerk


There is a new mural facing Flo Ware Park on South Jackson Street that will bring even more light to the area this summer. On the exterior wall of the Seattle Girls’ School is “Find Yourself Outside,” a mural depicting black people in a Pacific Northwest landscape swimming, paddleboarding, dancing, camping and exploring the urban outdoors. . At the center of the mural, emerging from a body of water, is a larger-than-life head made up of two faces glued together. The left side of the face is purple and lavender, made of repeated lines and eyes, a recurring archetype in the artist AfroSPKwork. The right side of the face is painted in purple, red, yellow and cold blue, framed by a halo of curly hair, painted by the artist Perri rhoden. The result is a celebration of black people in the open air and intriguing symbols that make the viewer take a closer look.

The two artists are part of the Living Matter Collective, a group of artists from BIPOC who painted the Black Lives Matter mural last summer at Capitol Hill Organized Protest (CHOP) and were selected through a partnership with Eddie Bauer and Urban works in February. The funding provided by Eddie Bauer is a physical manifestation of their statement of equity. The mural was loosely guided by the company’s #FindYourselfOutside campaign, designed to promote BIPOC’s visibility in the open air, but other than that AfroSPK and Rhoden were in creative control.

In one Instagram post Of the ‘Find Yourself Outside’ mural, he said: “It was an amazing collaborative work and an opportunity for me and the nugget to really come together and create something we never thought we would. it would exist. And to really help encourage our other siblings to really be outside and get into nature because it’s our space too.

Rhoden, whose Instagram account is @thecurlynugget, also spoke about what the theme of the fresco meant to her: “Despite the ongoing genocide of black Americans in this country, the gentrification and displacement of our communities and our families, the inequalities, the resulting micro-aggressions. of white supremacy, the ridiculous traumas we face, and all the systematic oppression that rages on us… we are ALWAYS fucking here!

“For me, going outside helps me breathe all this shit. So I breathe hope, peace, food, and then I find my joy again. Nature helps me find my center and it is also a place where I can be in community with those I love.

Rhoden is an abstract and mixed artist and muralist whose works are manifestations of black female energy. Paul Nunn, project manager at Urban Artworks, described the side of Rhoden’s fresco as a meditation on literally standing outside. Rhoden paints “a lot of characters that she can relate to – doing yoga, flying a kite with the resistance fist on it, or paddling,” he said.

Rhoden’s part of the work evokes a festive and relaxed atmosphere of a community gathering as people relax – or dance – on the water, all under the confident gaze of the central face.

AfroSPK’s side brings its own experience to life inside the work. The left side of the giant face is an iteration of an image commonly found in graffiti and paintings by AfroSPK. It is “the symbol of a person on the inside who helps create growth around them, which in turn helps create opportunities for communities to be successful,” says a statement on the. website.

A beam of light shines from the face to the lower left corner of the mural, illuminating a character with a backpack and spray paint can who is turned towards the viewer with a mischievous smile on his face, presumably on the verge of to mark a building. There are buildings and fences in AfroSPK’s art, and the characters inside are urban explorers. Just outside of town is a wooded area with a few people coming or going. AfroSPK also painted a building with a telescope looking at the face, implying a sense of surveillance. In addition to his work of art, design and curation, AfroSPK has also been involved in Seattle Art Vault, a non-profit organization that provides free art supplies to BIPOC artists.

Murals commissioned like “Find Yourself Outside” help Urban Artworks raise funds for their youth programs. Active since the mid-1990s, Urban Artworks offers programs where young people are paid either an hourly wage or a stipend for arts education or to tune into public art projects. This summer, Urban Artworks is offering five youth programs in the following areas: Georgetown’s Mini Mart City Park, Phinney Neighborhood Center in collaboration with Parkour Visions, Burien in collaboration with artist and writer Sasha LaPointe, a program to be determined at Shoreline, and a Seattle Seahawks wall base program.

Follow both AfroSPK and Rhodes on Instagram for updates on their work.


Mark Van Streefkerk is a South Seattle-based freelance journalist and writer living in the Beacon Hill neighborhood. He often writes on specialty coffee, LGBTQ + topics, and more. Visit his website at markvanstreefkerk.com and follow him on Instagram at @markthewriter.

📸 Featured image: “Find Yourself Outside” is a new mural in front of Flo Ware Park, a collaboration between AfroSPK and Perri Rhoden, both members of the Vivid Matter Collective. (Photo: Eddie Bauer)

Before you move on to the next story …
Please consider that the article you just read was made possible by the generous financial support of donors and sponsors. The Emerald is a BIPOC-led nonprofit news outlet with the mission of offering a wider lens of our region’s most diverse, least affluent, and woefully under-reported communities. Please consider making a one-time gift or, better yet, joining our Rainmaker Family by becoming a monthly donor. Your support will help provide fair pay for our journalists and enable them to continue writing the important stories that offer relevant news, information, and analysis. 
Support the Emerald!

]]>
http://russellchatham.com/two-artists-from-the-vivid-matter-collective-collaborate-on-the-new-mural-in-flo-ware-park/feed/ 0
Falling behind on your rent during COVID? California got you http://russellchatham.com/falling-behind-on-your-rent-during-covid-california-got-you/ http://russellchatham.com/falling-behind-on-your-rent-during-covid-california-got-you/#respond Fri, 25 Jun 2021 14:04:58 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/falling-behind-on-your-rent-during-covid-california-got-you/ California will pay off its rent All overdue rents accrued in California due to the Covid-19 pandemic could be reimbursed by the state government under a $ 5.2 billion plan backed by Governor Gavin Newsom, according to The Associated Press. The money comes from several federal aid programs and an unexpected state budget surplus. Jason […]]]>

California will pay off its rent

All overdue rents accrued in California due to the Covid-19 pandemic could be reimbursed by the state government under a $ 5.2 billion plan backed by Governor Gavin Newsom, according to The Associated Press. The money comes from several federal aid programs and an unexpected state budget surplus.

Jason Elliott, Newsom’s housing and homelessness adviser, told the AP it was enough to cover all rent arrears statewide, by expanding existing rent assistance. Distributing funds for rent assistance is a challenge, however, with only $ 32 million in rent assistance distributed out of the $ 490 million requested until May.

Meanwhile, the state legislature has not agreed on an approach to the evictions. On Thursday, the CDC announced that it was extending eviction protections for an additional 30 days after the original expiration date of June 30.

Under California’s existing rent assistance programs, landlords can receive 80% of the state’s past due rents in exchange for a 20% rebate, according to a separate report on ABC News. But the new plan is to increase the state’s reimbursement to 100%, reinstating any rents that landlords may have lost last year.

“Our challenge is to get this out as quickly as possible while protecting against fraud and making sure we put those who have the most difficulty first,” Elliott told the New York Times.

160 requests for accessory housing units in the first weeks of the Chicago pilot program

Since May, Chicago landowners have applied for permits to build more than 160 sheds and basement and attic apartments in a new three-year pilot program that eases restrictions on the construction of secondary suites, according to the Chicago Tribune.

The pilot program only applies in certain areas of the city, but was created as part of an effort to establish more low-cost housing in Chicago, the report says. The program has different rules for owners of single-family homes compared to multi-family properties, and owners who develop more than two ADUs on a single property are required to reserve half of the units at affordable rents for people earning up to 60 percent of income. median income for the region, according to the report. In the first weeks of the program, 151 homeowners applied for permits to create 167 new accessory units, with about two-thirds of the applications submitted for basement or attic apartments. Affordability requirements have applied to 12 units approved so far, according to the report.

The Chicago Department of Housing will also offer forgivable loans of up to $ 25,000 for low and moderate income homeowners who wish to create ADUs on their own properties, the Tribune reported. The ministry told the Tribune that the ADU program will be evaluated after three years for the number of units and the number of affordable units created in each district. As the next town recently reported, Charleston is preparing to launch a small grant program to help homeowners build secondary suites there.

The Twin Cities have the biggest racial ownership gap

The homeownership gap among black and white residents of the Twin Cities is the largest of any metropolitan area in the country, and it has “widened considerably since 2000,” according to a new report from the Urban Institute.

Homeownership among blacks declines the most in gentrifying neighborhoods where housing costs are rising the most, suggesting that in addition to apartment prices for renters, landlords are “facing an increase. property values ​​and higher property taxes and therefore a greater likelihood of being burdened by housing costs or subject to foreclosure, ”the report says.

Between 2005 and 2020, the number of single-family homes rented rather than owned rose from 22,000 to 48,000, in line with the growing share of rental housing in other cities, according to the report. And investors are buying a growing share of single-family homes in the Twin Cities, especially in areas with declining populations of low-income residents and residents of color, he says.

“While single-family rentals can offer low-income families the opportunity to live in convenient and comfortable neighborhoods, they can also help reduce homeownership and can subject tenants to precarious conditions,” says The report. “Local governments should ensure that tenants are protected from unfair evictions, and state and national governments should ensure that owner investors, especially large businesses, are regulated and taxed in a manner that reflects their impact on society. ”

The research was carried out in partnership with the Alliance, the Family Housing Fund and the Center for Economic Inclusion, with support from the McKnight Foundation.

Jared Brey is the Housing Correspondent for Next City, based in Philadelphia. He is a former editor of Philadelphia Magazine and PlanPhilly, and his work has appeared in Columbia Journalism Review, Landscape Architecture Magazine, US News & World Report, Philadelphia Weekly, and other publications.

Follow Jared . (JavaScript must be enabled to display this email address)

]]> http://russellchatham.com/falling-behind-on-your-rent-during-covid-california-got-you/feed/ 0 THE TRIP OF THE ‘IRISH GIRL’ from Achill Island to the Boston MFA http://russellchatham.com/the-trip-of-the-irish-girl-from-achill-island-to-the-boston-mfa/ http://russellchatham.com/the-trip-of-the-irish-girl-from-achill-island-to-the-boston-mfa/#respond Tue, 22 Jun 2021 19:21:23 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/the-trip-of-the-irish-girl-from-achill-island-to-the-boston-mfa/ The girl’s auburn hair, rosy complexion and surprisingly blue eyes remain frozen in time. Since the moment, more than a century ago, when the famous American artist Robert Henri (1865-1929) immortalized her on canvas on Achill Island, the pretty and innocent face of Mary O’Donnel testifies of a remote Irish landscape which, according to art […]]]>

The girl’s auburn hair, rosy complexion and surprisingly blue eyes remain frozen in time. Since the moment, more than a century ago, when the famous American artist Robert Henri (1865-1929) immortalized her on canvas on Achill Island, the pretty and innocent face of Mary O’Donnel testifies of a remote Irish landscape which, according to art historian Margaret Stenz, the painter “was a scene from [J.M. Synge’s] “The Playboy of the Western World. This haunting image of a vanished Ireland now resides not in a museum in Dublin, but in a former Boston stronghold, the Museum of Fine Arts.

Robert Henry Cozad was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1865 to his father, John Jackson Cozad, a suave traveling professional gamer with a sizable ego and a knack for making enemies. The father shot and killed a man during a financial dispute in the town of Cozad, Nebraska, which he had founded and named for himself. Although he was on trial for acting in self-defense, the prospect of the deceased’s family chasing Cozad caused him, his wife and children to flee the area and head east. Later, Robert Cozad and several of his siblings adopted new surnames in hopes of distancing themselves from their father’s checkered reputation. Robert Henry Cozad changed his name to Robert Henri (pronounced Hen-rye).

A gifted artist from an early age, Henri perfected his nascent talent first at the Academy of Fine Arts in Pennsylvania then at the prestigious Julien Academy in Paris. In 1891 he was admitted to the much-vaunted École des Beaux-Arts, and he divided his time between the schools he directed in Paris and Philadelphia, where he married Linda Craige, one of his students.

Henri had a year of escape to Paris in 1899, when five of his paintings were awarded on the walls of two of the city’s largest galleries. He returns to the United States with his reputation as a rising star of the art world taking shape. In 1905, however, the death of his wife after a series of illnesses and a miscarriage devastated the painter.

Three years later, two profound events, one personal, the other professional, upset the course of Henri’s life. The 42-year-old artist fell in love and married 22-year-old Irish-born Marjorie Organ, a student at her school in New York City. That same year, 1908, he and seven other painters dubbed “The Eight” rocked the art world with grainy works capturing images of America’s poor. This effort was in keeping with his portraits of rural peasants and impoverished city dwellers in Spain, France, the Netherlands and Ireland during summer stays in Europe.

In the summer of 1913, the couple traveled to Ireland and made a detour to Achill Island. There they befriended Pat Sheridan, a renowned seascape painter and owner of the Hotel Slievemore, in Dugort. Sheridan and the rugged beauty of the island persuaded the Henri to stay for the summer. The artist, captivated by the faces of the island, begins a love story with Achill that will last for years. His enthusiasm was fueled in large part by a friendship with old islander Brian O’Malley, a man who knew every inch of the island.

Most summers they rented Corrymore House, a sprawling, sprawling residence near Dooagh and Keel that once belonged to the infamous Captain Charles Boycott, an English land agent who was ostracized by the natives of the island for his work on behalf of Britain. His legacy is the name given to the practice of withholding the purchase of certain goods for one cause or another. Henri and his wife bought the mansion in 1924 and returned there for four consecutive years.

He painted portraits of dozens of islanders and was especially determined to paint the faces of Achill’s children with brush oil. In his book “The Art Spirit” he said: “If you paint children, you must not have any condescending attitude towards them. Anyone who approaches a child without humility, without wonder, fails in his judgment of what is in front of him… .Paint with respect for [the child]….[The child] is the great possibility, the independent individual.

In the summer of 1913, Henry brought all aspects of this approach into his portrayal of a young girl named Mary O’Donnel, the daughter of the Corrymore Guardians. He paid her the current half-krone “model salary”, a welcome allowance amid the difficult lives of most Achill families.

In a letter to John T. Spaulding, a famous Boston art collector who lived in a presbytery on Beacon Street, Henry wrote that Mary was “shy and speechless in the presence of strangers,” but that it was possible to see her run around the island on horseback. and picking sea herbs. Enthusiastic, Spaulding purchased the painting in 1921 and ultimately donated it to the Museum of Fine Arts. The canvas is the only one of Henri’s works purchased by Spaulding.

While many of Boston’s old guard families were barely as enamored with “The Irish Girl” as Spaulding, Mary O’Donnel, despite her shyness, still draws attention as the face of a bygone era in the world. rural Achill Island. It deserves its place among the treasures of the Museum of Fine Arts.

]]>
http://russellchatham.com/the-trip-of-the-irish-girl-from-achill-island-to-the-boston-mfa/feed/ 0
He thought he could outsmart the gig economy. He was wrong http://russellchatham.com/he-thought-he-could-outsmart-the-gig-economy-he-was-wrong/ http://russellchatham.com/he-thought-he-could-outsmart-the-gig-economy-he-was-wrong/#respond Tue, 22 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/he-thought-he-could-outsmart-the-gig-economy-he-was-wrong/ The job didn’t come naturally – “You’re driven to treat people like products,” he says – but it was a job he could do without a college degree. His mother, who divided her time between Beijing and San Francisco, began buying houses to invest. She tried to help Fang do business by having him process […]]]>

The job didn’t come naturally – “You’re driven to treat people like products,” he says – but it was a job he could do without a college degree. His mother, who divided her time between Beijing and San Francisco, began buying houses to invest. She tried to help Fang do business by having him process one of his loans. She also urged him to borrow for his own accommodation. Fang was 22 and only earned $ 40,000 after premiums, but that was 2004. He got a variable rate mortgage for a $ 638,000 cookie-cutter house in a popular neighborhood. His parents participated in the down payment.

Four years later, scraping the bottom of employee performance targets, he left the bank before being fired. Now 26, he returned to City College, this time diligently. He immersed himself in philosophy, was part of the waltz team and was elected to the highest student board, student advisor, hoping to apply for a transfer to his dream schools, Stanford and Berkeley. Fang was on the way up, haranguing the community college board to strengthen its leadership, pressuring the California legislature in the costume of Mao made for his graduation party, presiding over the graduation ceremony on the same scene that Nancy Pelosi. The guy who gets things done.

In 2010, with only a part-time job at a pet store, he was also the guy who often missed his monthly payment of $ 2,500 for his house. His house was not worth what he owed him, and in 2013 he was pushed into the ranks of the 10 million Americans whose homes were foreclosed during the Great Recession. He was lucky once again: his parents let him move into one of their investment houses, rent free. Yet the drudgery – his money problems, college politics, high school work – started to bring his grades down. A familiar shame set in: “Forget your dream, you won’t make it.” So, he said, “I left”.

During a trip to Beijing in 2013, Fang encountered a more welcome complication. His parents, he says, wanted him to continue his life – their youngest son was married, while Fang had “X number of failed relationships and nothing to show,” he says. They invited a young physiotherapist to dinner. He was struck by her gentleness and college education. They kept in touch and over the months, via texts and calls, he fell “super in love”. They started talking about marriage. He told her he was broke, his credit, and that he had no job. She said they would be okay with it. “I was like, ‘This is her.'”

Fang withdrew more than half of the money from his 401 (k) to buy a ticket to China for the wedding in April 2014. The plan was for his wife to eventually join him in San Francisco. But to make sure immigrants don’t become public burdens, U.S. citizens need assets to sponsor visa applications. Fang figured it would take months, if not more than a year, to raise enough money to bring his new wife to California. Shortly after his return to San Francisco, married but alone, he learns that his wife is pregnant. Now, with two people to sponsor and her empty bank account, the process was going to take longer. He needed a job where he could save money and also take time to visit Beijing for a few months a year. What profession would allow this?

One day, as Fang was walking through Union Square, a car covered with a Day-Glo mustache passed. He Googled “pink mustache”. As Fang became engrossed in City College politics, his adopted town had grown into a booming town after the recession. Since Uber’s creation in 2008, venture capital has infiltrated the so-called on-demand economy. Using freelancers to meet fluctuating customer demand, apps promised groceries delivered, Ikea cabinets assembled, dogs walked. Business talk to drivers: in a city in turmoil, they could also be entrepreneurs.

Fang just needed the money. He rode in his father’s 2002 Acura TL and opened the pink app. After a few hours of driving, he had earned $ 71. “I got acquainted with this job very quickly,” says Fang, “and I got good fast enough. In hindsight, that was precisely the problem.

3.

At first, Fang was the driving force behind Lyft’s marketing fantasies. He happily took almost every ride for eight to ten hours a day. Customers have given him five-star reviews: “Great guy. Very smart. “He would wait half an hour, unpaid, for a couple to finish spitting on the sidewalk before either of them got inside. He handed out free bottles of water. chatted amicably, played at the classic resort, and dressed up as Batman for Halloween.

After a few months, Fang became more strategic. He divided the day to surf the morning and evening rushes, when the surge pushed up prices. From Thursday to Saturday, he drove the bar crowd home until just before dawn. Fang imposed a tight budget, ranging from the $ 3 Safeway burrito bowl or the $ 1.50 hot dog and soda at Costco. He brought home $ 1,200 a week before expenses – enough, because he lived without rent, to put money aside and send it to Beijing, where his wife had moved into her parents’ house. He would visit her, usually for about two months at the start of the year and again for a month in the fall. The app, the passengers and its strict frugality lined up in a virtuous circle. I help people. I earn money. It will work out.

]]>
http://russellchatham.com/he-thought-he-could-outsmart-the-gig-economy-he-was-wrong/feed/ 0
“Giving Birth” and Community Theater: Suturing Fragmented Relationships Through the Art of Pain http://russellchatham.com/giving-birth-and-community-theater-suturing-fragmented-relationships-through-the-art-of-pain/ http://russellchatham.com/giving-birth-and-community-theater-suturing-fragmented-relationships-through-the-art-of-pain/#respond Mon, 21 Jun 2021 20:55:37 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/giving-birth-and-community-theater-suturing-fragmented-relationships-through-the-art-of-pain/ To give birth, an interview-based play co-created by Chinese artist-scholar Zhiyong Zhao and the Mulan Community Service Center, centers its narration around a group of female migrant workers in Beijing and their authentic tales of the pain of childbirth. An experience that is both personal and relatable, physical pain becomes an entry point for the […]]]>

To give birth, an interview-based play co-created by Chinese artist-scholar Zhiyong Zhao and the Mulan Community Service Center, centers its narration around a group of female migrant workers in Beijing and their authentic tales of the pain of childbirth. An experience that is both personal and relatable, physical pain becomes an entry point for the public in downtown Beijing to learn more about the community of migrant workers, their cohabitants in this metropolis who are often unheard of and invisible.

The 2019 premiere of To give birth was held at the Juyin Theater, a 100-seat black box theater located in downtown Beijing, a 10-minute drive from Tiananmen Square. On a black basket is Liu Yun, a 45-year-old domestic worker and member of the Mulan community. She plays the role of a woman named Xiaoyu. She splits her legs. An actor playing his doctor touches her bulging belly, smells the head of the embryo, and pricks a huge injector into her body. The doctor cuts the flesh and bones with pliers and puts them in a plastic bucket. The audience holds their breath and this small space in the heart of Beijing is filled with the jittery sounds of clocks, crying babies and rapid heartbeats.

Photo by Hao Li

Through interviews and design workshops, To give birth extracts the real-life experiences of dozens of members of the Mulan community in one character, Xiaoyu, a young woman from an underprivileged rural province who came to Beijing for employment opportunities to support her family. Having no training in skilled labor, Xiaoyu becomes a domestic worker in a middle class household that performs basic cleaning tasks with meager pay and without a legal contract. Due to her early marriage, economic pressure from her family, and lack of proper education in sexual and reproductive health, Xiaoyu has had two deliveries and three abortions in five years. Xiaoyu’s story describes the common dilemmas of underserved working-class women: rude hygienic conditions, traditional patriarchal culture in rural society, heavy physical labor and its damage to contraceptive implants, unwanted pregnancy that ensues and the lack of care and companionship. Unlike the family planning challenges faced by urban middle class women, the pain of childbirth experienced by impoverished women is rooted in their socio-economic conditions.

Zhiyong Zhao has been a community theater researcher and practitioner for over ten years. A popular impression of community theater sees it as a cathartic channel for collective healing, to alleviate repressed trauma through artistic reenactment and expression. However, for Zhiyong, the notion of psychological healing is not only a precarious illusion, but also risks enchanting and obscuring the complex conditions of social reality.

The first time Zhiyong showed Liu Yun the script, she said with red eyes, “I can’t seem to finish reading this play, it’s too hard for me.” Liu Yun had remained calm and had not shed any tears during her interviews, as if she was telling someone else’s story. But when she watched the show the night of the premiere, seeing her pain portrayed on stage, her painful memory was brought up. Liu Yun admitted that the process of recreating her story had been painful, but she insisted on preparing to talk about it. “I felt that I had grown up throughout the process,” Liu Yun concludes.

Liu Yun in rehearsal. Photo by EAcademy

For Zhiyong, the goal of creating To give birth is not the cathartic effect of healing, but of helping society see and understand the difficulties of migrant workers, which can be anatomized into the theme of childbirth. For example, in Xiaoyu’s story, it is carefully demonstrated why the protagonist had unwanted pregnancies over and over again, why she couldn’t afford abortion surgeries in a regular hospital, why she had to undergo the unauthorized labor and abortions on her own. Although childbirth is a physical experience, there are many socio-economic and cultural factors that underlie it – and it is for this dimension that Zhiyong wants to create a public space for discussion, rather than locking up. these factors in the victimized narrative of the trauma.

In one scene, a midwife in a rudimentary rural clinic tells Xiaoyu, “It is common to get an infection after an induced abortion. It is part of the life of women. Just apply drugs to your private part, no need to let someone else know and make a scene, “as if abortion is something devious and shameful. During Xiaoyu’s postpartum birth, a villager accuses her of idling all day to escape labor, claiming that “childbirth is not necessarily painful. It took my wife less time to give birth than it took me to collect the eggs in the henhouse ”. Xiaoyu’s physical pain is forced into a system of medical as well as patriarchal discourse and dismissed as trivial. To give birth emphasizes that childbirth is a matter of publicity confined to the realm of privacy, and the private nature of physical pain traps the victim in desperate isolation and helplessness, with her pain completely subject to distortion and sub -estimation in the public sphere.

Desperately, Xiaoyu can only express the pain of labor, infection, sting and laceration in the most spontaneous way on stage: moaning, crying, twisting and screaming. Ironically, in the face of this violent but powerful display of body language, all other form of dismissive speech appears overshadowed. Using the most natural expression of pain, Xiaoyu gave him back his own body and memory at a heavy price. Pain, as an unruly force, restores the body’s own sensations and biological expressions. In other words, while Xiaoyu feels and expresses her pain, her aching uterus is no longer the sacred palace of birth, her vagina is no longer a passage to life, her breasts are no longer a gentle source of growth. Rather, these became rebellious organs, escaping the strict patriarchal discipline of the body.

Photo by Han Zhao

Not only did the Mulan workers generate the content for Xiaoyu’s story from their own experience, they also delivered it on stage as a set. To give birth illustrates a private experience by having one interviewee and three monologues (all of them migrant workers in Mu Lan Hua Kai) recounting and embodying Xiaoyu’s story together. When Xiaoyu undergoes an abortion and childbirth operation, the monologues simultaneously stage his pain through gestures, facial expressions and bodily movements.

The worker-actor ensemble forms a powerful embodiment of millions of working-class women in China on stage. Thanks to their overall performance, the pain of childbirth becomes shareable and questionable, thus binding the women in a close fraternity of solidarity. Individuals take back the sovereignty of their bodies by openly discussing their stigmatized pain, and by sharing that pain, they have transformed their suffering body into a public space open to liberation, comfort and understanding.

Beyond the bodily and gender experience, the most touching and stimulating aspect of To give birth is her thorough and truthful investigation into the intersectionality of the difficulties of working women. When we talk about women’s solidarity in a feminist context, one of the most difficult issues is the fragmentation of different groups within women – the fractured landscape of feminist discourse is waiting to be integrated. To give birth is not a radical feminist manifesto, or a simplified punishment against men, but an attempt to build a bridge of understanding between men and women, between the urban middle class audience and the working class creators / performers rural – between different groups of people who are isolated in rigidified social positions, to see each other’s real life.

Zhiyong remarks that “theater has the potential to transform into cultural practice and public action in a wider social arena”. Including To give birth, he led and participated in several long term projects with Mulan Community. Over the years, Zhiyong and workers like Liu Yun get to know each other, support each other, and make a very deep emotional connection. It becomes a complicity.

He does not ignore a common and fairly strong argument against community theater methodologies: when the logic of the art industry attributes the ownership and credits of the collective process to artists, it is inevitable that ordinary “civilians” are used and exploited by artists. In Zhiyong’s view, the work of artists today has largely become a matter of using their expertise to build a platform for public participation. The mode of artistic production has undergone such a profound transformation that if the finalized artwork is still signed with the artist’s name and exhibited in galleries and museums, or performed at art festivals, then it exists a logical and ethical paradox. The task of community theater is to suture the world of the arts with the world of reality and transform the theater into a space where we think, criticize and make change, instead of a magic box to re-enchant the relationships between people and their reality. .

In July 2020, To give birth presented their latest screening online, showing a recording of their 2019 live performance. As it reached a wider audience at home and abroad, many of the cast had already left Beijing and their communities in Mulan, due to the heavy impact of COVID-19 on housework such as housekeeping and cleaning. Now the only ongoing project at Mu Lan Hua Kai is an online photography workshop: Zhiyong invited a photographer to provide free cell phone photography vlog tutorials in a WeChat group, where community members are encouraged to take pictures of their everyday life, share thoughts and discuss.

It has been months since Zhiyong has been able to see one of the “sisters” in his community in person, but he occasionally looked at their photos in the WeChat group and got to know each other’s experiences and feelings in the community. in recent months. . Zhiyong says, “It really is a great way to maintain community, to give our sisters a sense of belonging and creative power, and most of all, to have fun despite the hardships of life. It’s a way for art to enter and engage in the lives of people that I really appreciate.

A workshop at the Mulan Community Service Center. Photo by Lan Ye


Publication displays:
172

]]>
http://russellchatham.com/giving-birth-and-community-theater-suturing-fragmented-relationships-through-the-art-of-pain/feed/ 0
Why is the work of female artists always less valued than the work of male artists? http://russellchatham.com/why-is-the-work-of-female-artists-always-less-valued-than-the-work-of-male-artists/ http://russellchatham.com/why-is-the-work-of-female-artists-always-less-valued-than-the-work-of-male-artists/#respond Thu, 17 Jun 2021 17:32:00 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/why-is-the-work-of-female-artists-always-less-valued-than-the-work-of-male-artists/ The graph above indicates that, although small, there are some differences in the media used by male and female artists, with the notable observation that men remain the dominant producers of conventional media, such as painting. and sculpture. Taking this investigation further, basic log ratio analyzes indicate that there are also differences in the more […]]]>

The graph above indicates that, although small, there are some differences in the media used by male and female artists, with the notable observation that men remain the dominant producers of conventional media, such as painting. and sculpture.

Taking this investigation further, basic log ratio analyzes indicate that there are also differences in the more than 1,000 characteristics applied to works of art by The Art Genome Project. That is, in some ways, women and men produce different characteristics of art according to this taxonomy. While the vast majority of characteristics show no substantial difference by gender, there are some that do. Analyzes of ongoing research further suggest that with these features of the Art Genome project, a machine learning algorithm can classify art by artist’s gender with a relatively high degree of accuracy. How this finding ties in with the claim that women and men make art with different characteristics is a central focus of the research.

If the preliminary conclusion that men and women, in some respects, produce art with different characteristics is confirmed by further scientific examination, the next step is to investigate whether the characteristics appearing most often in the women’s work are also associated with lower prices or other outcomes. of artistic value. If this is the case, then the undervaluation of “feminine” characteristics may contribute to our broader understanding of gender inequality in the art world. The evidence that this hypothesis could be confirmed is provided by a weak but negative correlation between the chances of a feature of the Art Genome project appearing in the works of art of women, as opposed to men, and the selling price of the works of art. art displaying this characteristic.

Sociologist Pierre Bourdieu once joked that “sociology and art don’t mix.” His reasoning was based on the tension between the desire of the art world to focus on individual creative genius and the insistent aim of sociology to explain phenomena in terms of social forces. Who and what defines art and quality, what institutions are important and how to access them, who knows who, whether the benefit is accrued from a past of prejudice, and where the conscious prejudices and Unconscious of culture interrupt economic valuation – these are the questions that sociologists explain to greatness. It is not a denial of quality, talent, innovation or genius, but a way of contextualizing them.

As a brief analysis shows here, efforts to analyze this context in the realm of the contemporary art world can be aided by online art platforms. Data from these platforms helps answer questions not only on gender, but also on race and ethnicity, age, career stage, and socio-economic status. And not just on inequalities, but also on networks and curation, the changing influence of roles and institutions, the position of art in social life, the tastes and demographics of collectors, and the emerging influence. algorithmic recommendation systems and social media. In other words, the marriage of these platforms with academic research will teach us more than ever about the roles, models and processes that together (re) produce the art world as we know it.

]]>
http://russellchatham.com/why-is-the-work-of-female-artists-always-less-valued-than-the-work-of-male-artists/feed/ 0
Green Gallery Brings the Art World to Summit County http://russellchatham.com/green-gallery-brings-the-art-world-to-summit-county/ http://russellchatham.com/green-gallery-brings-the-art-world-to-summit-county/#respond Mon, 31 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/green-gallery-brings-the-art-world-to-summit-county/ George W. Davis A love of fabric and craftsmanship as well as a desire to own a retail store with broad appeal continue to propel local entrepreneur and green community leader Joan Smith despite the COVID-19 pandemic. When the epidemic hit the world, Smith was forced to close the doors of her art studio Gallery […]]]>

George W. Davis

A love of fabric and craftsmanship as well as a desire to own a retail store with broad appeal continue to propel local entrepreneur and green community leader Joan Smith despite the COVID-19 pandemic.

When the epidemic hit the world, Smith was forced to close the doors of her art studio Gallery 143 for two months in mid-March 2020. But with the help of her team of three artists and the encouragement of The store’s customer base, the 2,600-square-foot facility reopened last year in mid-May.

“Those who wish to return to work explained how we could navigate there, make ourselves and our customers safe,” said Smith, member of the board of directors of the Green Area Chamber of Commerce.

Smith is also the show director of the Green art-A-palooza festival on August 21 at Boettler Park and the Wilderfest festival on October 2 at Southgate Park behind the Twisted Olive restaurant. Both festivals will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

]]>
http://russellchatham.com/green-gallery-brings-the-art-world-to-summit-county/feed/ 0
See footage from a new David Hammons show that will make you guess what you think you’re seeing http://russellchatham.com/see-footage-from-a-new-david-hammons-show-that-will-make-you-guess-what-you-think-youre-seeing/ http://russellchatham.com/see-footage-from-a-new-david-hammons-show-that-will-make-you-guess-what-you-think-youre-seeing/#respond Fri, 14 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://russellchatham.com/see-footage-from-a-new-david-hammons-show-that-will-make-you-guess-what-you-think-youre-seeing/ “David Hammons: Basketball and Kool-Aid“To see at Nahmad Contemporaryuntil June 25, 2021 What the gallery says: “Invoking the material concerns of Arte Povera and the conceptual investigations of Marcel Duchamp, David Hammons appropriates the ephemeral of everyday life to explore the cultural and societal sub-texts inherent in materials, images, objects and language . A common […]]]>

David Hammons: Basketball and Kool-Aid
To see at Nahmad Contemporary
until June 25, 2021

What the gallery says: “Invoking the material concerns of Arte Povera and the conceptual investigations of Marcel Duchamp, David Hammons appropriates the ephemeral of everyday life to explore the cultural and societal sub-texts inherent in materials, images, objects and language . A common thread throughout his multifaceted work, which spans more than 50 years, is an investigation of stereotypes, prejudices and racial identities in the United States. As such, the works “Basketball” (1995-2012) and “Kool-Aid” (2003-2007) explore the constructs of race and cliché associations linked to black American experience and culture.

Why it’s worth a look: David Hammons spend a moment. The inimitable and enigmatic artist, a recluse by the standards of today’s demand that everyone be perfectly self-branded, is the subject of three simultaneous working exhibitions, with his seminal “body prints” (among other works) exhibited at the Design Center in Tribeca; his long-awaited tribute to Gordon Matta-Clark, End of the day, practically done on the Hudson River; and another exhibition at Nahmad Contemporary, where hs presents two rarely exhibited series.

Hammons used his own body as a tool to create works, leaving a mark that is both very personal and points to the larger topic of black bodies being commodified, manipulated and deified. For his basketball designs, Hammons bounced charcoal-coated balls on pristine white paper, creating subtle gradations. The element of luck inherent in bouncing a ball is a nod to the luck in a million offered to exceptional athletes who escape difficult circumstances and advance to the ranks of the professional game.

Kool-Aid works, on the other hand, are done by applying the colored powder to the paper in swirls and bursts resembling watercolor. To add an element of concealment, silk curtains are draped over the works, partially covering them, denying the viewer full understanding or access.

What did he look like:

Untitled (Basketball Drawing) (2006-7). © ️ David Hammons / Courtesy of Nahmad Contemporary. “Width =” 768 “height =” 1024 “srcset =” https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2021/05/JNA_DHammons_042921_51547-768×1024 .jpg 768w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2021/05/JNA_DHammons_042921_51547-225×300.jpg 225w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2021/05 /JNA_DHammons_042921_51547-38×50.jpg 38w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2021/05/JNA_DHammons_042921_51547-1440×1920.jpg 1440w “sizes =” (max-width: 768px) 100v “/ 768px >

David Hammons, Untitled (Basketball Drawing) (2006-7). © ️ David Hammons / Courtesy of Nahmad Contemporary.

David Hammons, <i>Untitled (Kool-Aid)</i> (2004).  © ️ David Hammons / Courtesy of Nahmad Contemporary. “Width =” 768 “height =” 1024 “srcset =” https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2021/05/JNA_DHammons_04282150859-768×1024 .jpg 768w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2021/05/JNA_DHammons_04282150859-225×300.jpg 225w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2021/05 /JNA_DHammons_04282150859-38×50.jpg 38w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2021/05/JNA_DHammons_04282150859-1440×1920.jpg 1440w “sizes =” (max-width: 768px) 100vw / ” ></p>
<p class=David Hammons, Untitled (Kool-Aid) (2004). © ️ David Hammons / Courtesy of Nahmad Contemporary.

Installation view, "David Hammons: Basketball and Kool-Aid" at Nahmad Contemporain.  Photo: Photograph by Tom Powel Imaging.  © David Hammons.

Installation view, “David Hammons: Basketball & Kool-Aid” at Nahmad Contemporary. Photo: Photograph by Tom Powel Imaging. © David Hammons.

Installation view, "David Hammons: Basketball and Kool-Aid" at Nahmad Contemporain.  Photo: Photograph by Tom Powel Imaging.  © David Hammons.

Installation view, “David Hammons: Basketball & Kool-Aid” at Nahmad Contemporary. Photo: Photograph by Tom Powel Imaging. © David Hammons.

David Hammons, Untitled (Kool-Aid) (2003). © ️ David Hammons / Courtesy of Nahmad Contemporary.

David Hammons, <i>Untitled (Kool-Aid) </i> (2006).  © ️ David Hammons / Courtesy of Nahmad Contemporary. “Width =” 768 “height =” 1024 “srcset =” https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2021/05/JNA_DHammoms_04282150959-768×1024 .jpg 768w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2021/05/JNA_DHammoms_04282150959-225×300.jpg 225w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2021/05 /JNA_DHammoms_04282150959-37×50.jpg 37w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2021/05/JNA_DHammoms_04282150959-1440×1920.jpg 1440w “sizes =” (max-width: 768px) 100vw / ” ></p>
<p class=David Hammons, Untitled (Kool-Aid) (2006). © ️ David Hammons / Courtesy of Nahmad Contemporary.

Installation view, "David Hammons: Basketball and Kool-Aid" at Nahmad Contemporain.  Photo: Photograph by Tom Powel Imaging.  © David Hammons.

Installation view, “David Hammons: Basketball & Kool-Aid” at Nahmad Contemporary. Photo: Photograph by Tom Powel Imaging. © David Hammons.

Installation view, “David Hammons: Basketball & Kool-Aid” at Nahmad Contemporary. Photo: Photograph by Tom Powel Imaging. © David Hammons.

David Hammons, <i>Time Out (basketball drawing) </i> (2004/10).  © ️ David Hammons / Courtesy of Nahmad Contemporary. “Width =” 768 “height =” 1024 “srcset =” https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2021/05/JNA_DHammoms_04282150981-768×1024 .jpg 768w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2021/05/JNA_DHammoms_04282150981-225×300.jpg 225w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2021/05 /JNA_DHammoms_04282150981-37×50.jpg 37w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2021/05/JNA_DHammoms_04282150981-1440×1920.jpg 1440w “sizes =” (max-width: 768px) 100vw / ” ></p>
<p class=David Hammons, Time out (basketball drawing) (2004/10). © ️ David Hammons / Courtesy of Nahmad Contemporary.

To pursue Artnet news on Facebook:


Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the latest news, eye-opening interviews and cutting-edge reviews that keep the conversation going.

]]> http://russellchatham.com/see-footage-from-a-new-david-hammons-show-that-will-make-you-guess-what-you-think-youre-seeing/feed/ 0